ambi safety on a handgun

darkangel07760darkangel07760 MemberPosts: 182 Member
Yay! I finally got my permit to purchase my first handgun. being a lefty, I was trying to look up pistols with an ambi safety. I did some research online and fired a few, and I am looking for a full metal frame 9mm in a full size or compact.
I love the Sig 226, but the particular one I am interested in does not have an ambi safety. The ones I fired didn't either, and it didn't seem to be a huge issue, but I tried searching around onli e for some ideas and I am not knowledgeable enough to know if the handguns I was reading about were polymer or metal. Some I know are polymer, like the Glock of course.
What ambi metal frames do you folks recommend?
Thanks!

Comments

  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Glock
    No safety
    Revolver
    No safety
    Just something to keep in mind. The pistol guys will steer you better, Im notta ambi safety user.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • timctimc Senior Member Posts: 6,249 Senior Member
    I carry my 226 de-cocked, no need for safety.
    timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
    AKA: Former Founding Member
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 22,594 Senior Member
    Look at the XD-m glock style trigger safety and a 1911 style grip safety.

    Only issue I found was you cannot unload the chamber without the grip safety depressed, not a big deal because the trigger safety is still working..
    My new Signature
  • darkangel07760darkangel07760 Member Posts: 182 Member
    thanks!
    i was thinking about the 226, since i am getting a double action. i am not worried about whether or not i have a safety, though i was thinking for my 1st handgun it might be a good idea. that is why i was thinking about a DA because that might be enough for me. is anyone here a lefty that can provide some feedback on using a right side safety?
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 8,452 Senior Member
    What are you going to use it for? A target or HD pistol recommendation will be different than a carry pistol.

    I am left handed (sort of). I have used pistols with a right hand safety. I just don't use it when shooting at a range. Load, shoot, pull magazine, clear....... Religiously keep it pointed down range at all times.
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • timctimc Senior Member Posts: 6,249 Senior Member
    The only handguns I have with ambi safeties are a couple of my 1911's and only because I sometimes carry right handed and sometimes left handed. I shoot just as well with either hand so I carry as the mood strikes me.
    timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
    AKA: Former Founding Member
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Ya, I have a P90DC with an ambi. That model has been obsolete for a coons age.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • NCFUBARNCFUBAR Senior Member Posts: 4,173 Senior Member
    While I am not a lefty, I do try to shoot both right and left handed. I am partial to 1911's and find with a slight grip shift I can toggle the safety with my left index finger on 1911's ... as well as a few other makes but not others. Basically just don't rush to buy and handle as many as possible. I will say since you are in Jersey and being your first handgun I'd stay with something in the size and weight of the Sig P226. You will have a handgun to enjoy at the range and be able to use as HD since in Jersey you likely will never be able to carry. I will suggest you check out the CZ75 line which offers features that you might like. Again it is what feels best in your hands and you feel you can operate best.
    “The further a society drifts from truth ... the more it will hate those who speak it."
    - George Orwell
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 6,590 Senior Member
    It's an interesting time in the pistol world.

    Polymer with no safety (separate from maybe one on the trigger) at all, with a uniform trigger pull on first and subsequent shots seems to be the current rage. Glock, Springfield XD, S&W M&P, Sig P320, the new Ruger, Remington, and HK options, etc...

    The aluminum frame "children of the '80's" with a DA first shot SA for subsequent shots (Sig 220 series, Beretta 92, S&W 59 descendants, Ruger P89/90/91) seem to be going away They don't offer any real durability advantage over polymer; they cost more to make; two trigger pulls to sort out under stress is regarded by many as a negative - and they and many of the polymer variants of this family (Ruger P95/97) are tapering away because of it. The polymer HK USP family hangs on because it's trigger system can be formatted to allow a DA or SA first shot, or for DA only, which gives the operator consistency.

    Then you've got all-steel for those of us who like or insist on it. More expensive to make, so therefore the options are more limited. These will mainly be the SA-only 1911 and Browning Hi Power, whose histories speak for themselves and the excellent CZ-75 family, which is originally set for DA or SA first shot with no decocker, and can be had in SAO, or DA/SA/decocker models. Current versions of these can all be had with at least some ambidextrous controls.

    What are your concerns regarding either features or materials?
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 17,913 Senior Member
    Check out this one:

    https://www.classicfirearms.com/cz-82-pistols

    The CZ-82 is a Czechoslovakian military surplus pistol chambered for the 9X18 cartridge- - - -halfway bewtween a .380 and a 9MM Luger. It has a double-stack magazine and an ambi safety, and can be stored or carried safely with the hammer down on a chambered round and the safety disengaged. It can also be carried "cocked and locked", hammer back and the safety on, your choice. The first round from the hammer down position is double action- - - -"point and click". I've got one, and it's a good shooter, accurate, with a pretty decent trigger pull either single or double action. The price is right, too!
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • JRLJRL Member Posts: 355 Member
    Metal frame 9mm Compact CZ75D PCR (D for decocker)

    Has no safety- it is carried de-docked

    Wonderful metal alloy frame with steel slide and 14+1 capacity

    Easy peasy to carry
  • darkangel07760darkangel07760 Member Posts: 182 Member
    Yep, I live in NJ, so it definitely will not be concealed carry. I will be taking it to the range and it will also be used for personal defense. I am not particularly concerned about an ambi safety, but being left handed I was wondering if it makes that big of a difference. For example, I had a right handed bolt action, and ended up returning it because I could not adjust to using my right hand to pull the bolt back. I have a right handed AR15 however, and that has not been a problem for me to use at all. I fired a Springfield 1911 and a Glock 21 and I liked the all metal frame more. Even with me firing 45acp, I had a lot less "snap" with the 1911, which made it easier for me to get back on target. I am getting a 9mm though, due to price of ammo and the "snap" is much more manageable for me.
    I have seen quite a few recommendations for the CZ. I will take a look at it, I didn't check those out the last time I was at my gun shop. The Sig feels the best in my hand so far, and the sights were awesome.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    It's super hard to transition from double action to single action during live action fire and hit accurately with both shots. This is why striker fired pistols have become so popular.

    Having a long hard double action pull does negate having to use the safety, but so does keeping one's finger off the trigger.

    Some 1911's come with ambi safeties already installed, but one must remember to disengage the safety under extreme duress when the need is immediate.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,685 Senior Member
    thanks!
    i was thinking about the 226, since i am getting a double action. i am not worried about whether or not i have a safety, though i was thinking for my 1st handgun it might be a good idea. that is why i was thinking about a DA because that might be enough for me. is anyone here a lefty that can provide some feedback on using a right side safety?

    Most S&Ws I've seen can be ordered with an Ambi Safety. My old Model 469 was made with both ambi and right handed. Mine's a straight right hand safety. But that pistol needs a big hand to hold it. It's got a double wide magazine in the grip. I don't think they make em anymore either. But if you don't mind a fat grip, it would be the ticket for you. I think you can have a right hand version switched to the left side. Or you can buy an ambi part and have it installed. And it's pretty accurate for a 2 inch barrel. You can probably find one used for under $300.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,685 Senior Member
    Yep, I live in NJ, so it definitely will not be concealed carry. I will be taking it to the range and it will also be used for personal defense. I am not particularly concerned about an ambi safety, but being left handed I was wondering if it makes that big of a difference. For example, I had a right handed bolt action, and ended up returning it because I could not adjust to using my right hand to pull the bolt back. I have a right handed AR15 however, and that has not been a problem for me to use at all. I fired a Springfield 1911 and a Glock 21 and I liked the all metal frame more. Even with me firing 45acp, I had a lot less "snap" with the 1911, which made it easier for me to get back on target. I am getting a 9mm though, due to price of ammo and the "snap" is much more manageable for me.
    I have seen quite a few recommendations for the CZ. I will take a look at it, I didn't check those out the last time I was at my gun shop. The Sig feels the best in my hand so far, and the sights were awesome.

    If you aren't going to conceal carry, a 1911 is impossible to beat. The 1911s design is over 100 years old and I can't think of anything that beats it. If you can adjust to a right hand safety, you will be miles ahead, in my very limited opinion. They just work.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 9,332 Senior Member
    If you get a Glock, there is no thumb safety, as said above. It's perfectly safe so long as you don't pull the trigger, and a VERY good pistol. I say this not owning one, but having owned one before.

    The idea of "no safety" is foreign to many folks, but basically a Glock's safety is on the trigger. There are many designs like it, too.

    If you're going to just take it to the range, about any pistol or revolver will work fine if you keep your fingers off the trigger. No quality handgun will fire unless you pull the trigger. I THINK my S&W Shield has a thumb safety, but I don't know since I don't use it. Same with my .380 Bodyguard.

    A 1911 is a fine handgun but probably not one I'd recommend as a first pistol. It's heavy and recoil can be substantial for a new shooter. Takes training to be safe and while you can get that training through use, the learning curve is fairly steep for new shooters. When I was in the Infantry back in 1911 days, we trained on the 1911 for a couple of days and unintentional discharges weren't entirely uncommon.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 13,747 Senior Member
    early wrote: »
    Glock
    No safety
    Revolver
    No safety
    Just something to keep in mind. The pistol guys will steer you better, Im notta ambi safety user.
    Kahr makes good guns too. All the ones I have dealt with don't have a safety either.
  • R51MANR51MAN New Member Posts: 20 New Member
    Dark,
    here are several great 1911s on the market with ambi safeties, RIA, Kimber, colt, Ruger, Remington, I could go on. I guess you get the idea
    that I am a 1911 man. I carry a 9MM Hi Cap 1911, and recoil is not bad
    but, my back up carry is an R51 Remington. All steel guns. I like steel, not plastic. If you run out of ammo, you can beat the
    thug over the head with a steel gun. :<}
    Blackie
  • R51MANR51MAN New Member Posts: 20 New Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    If you get a Glock, there is no thumb safety, as said above. It's perfectly safe so long as you don't pull the trigger, and a VERY good pistol. I say this not owning one, but having owned one before.

    The idea of "no safety" is foreign to many folks, but basically a Glock's safety is on the trigger. There are many designs like it, too.

    If you're going to just take it to the range, about any pistol or revolver will work fine if you keep your fingers off the trigger. No quality handgun will fire unless you pull the trigger. I THINK my S&W Shield has a thumb safety, but I don't know since I don't use it. Same with my .380 Bodyguard.

    A 1911 is a fine handgun but probably not one I'd recommend as a first pistol. It's heavy and recoil can be substantial for a new shooter. Takes training to be safe and while you can get that training through use, the learning curve is fairly steep for new shooters. When I was in the Infantry back in 1911 days, we trained on the 1911 for a couple of days and unintentional discharges weren't entirely uncommon.

    A 1911 in 9MM is a fine first firearm, and the recoil is not bad. I carry a 9MM 1911 Hi Cap and the recoil is not bad at all.
    Blackie
  • bobbyrlf3bobbyrlf3 Senior Member Posts: 2,410 Senior Member
    If you weren't adamant about a steel frame, I'd suggest a look at the FN FNX9; has ambidextrous controls and excellent quality. They also make a striker-fired version, the FNS9, that is available with a manual safety.
    Knowledge is essential to living freely and fully; understanding gives knowledge purpose and strength; wisdom is combining the two and applying them appropriately in words and actions.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 4,955 Senior Member
    If it doesn't have to be new, there are plenty of Ruger P85 and P89's out there with aluminum frames but they don't have a rail for a laser or light. My significant other is left handed also and I bought her a Ruger SR22 some time back and I plan on getting her a SR9 soon. The controls and ergonomics are similar between the two guns and she likes and practices quit a bit with the SR22.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • dalidali Banned Posts: 39 Member
    Many IPSC and IDPA hands shoot an ambi safety'd 1911 in competition, and do fine. I personally dont know any southpaws who carry cocked and locked ccw. I dont like the off side lever's potential for being snagged on clothing, etc. So, if I were to carry such a gun left handed, I'd have the off side safety lever made small and not project much, since it's most unlikely to be needed. I was born left handed, but was taught to do many things right handed. When I learned fast draw, the ambi safety for the 1911 didn't yet exist, so I shoot it left handed, but shoot DA left handed. I prefer the cocked and locked SA auto, carried right handed, even in a pocket holster, but only if the frame shields the hammer, as with the Micro9 Kimber. If such things bother you, stick with DA or a Glock or XD
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 4,955 Senior Member
    dali wrote: »
    Many IPSC and IDPA hands shoot an ambi safety'd 1911 in competition, and do fine. I personally dont know any southpaws who carry cocked and locked ccw. I dont like the off side lever's potential for being snagged on clothing, etc. So, if I were to carry such a gun left handed, I'd have the off side safety lever made small and not project much, since it's most unlikely to be needed. I was born left handed, but was taught to do many things right handed. When I learned fast draw, the ambi safety for the 1911 didn't yet exist, so I shoot it left handed, but shoot DA left handed. I prefer the cocked and locked SA auto, carried right handed, even in a pocket holster, but only if the frame shields the hammer, as with the Micro9 Kimber. If such things bother you, stick with DA or a Glock or XD


    In IPSC and IDPA competition, one is occasionally called upon to shoot a stage "weak handed" and the ambidextrous controls facilitate that. My significant other is left handed and I wanted her to have a firearm that she can control easily. She didn't have the benefit of nuns beating her to force her to become right handed as you likely did.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • john9001john9001 Senior Member Posts: 668 Senior Member
    nobody uses safeties anymore because it will slow down their fast draw in a duel with the bad guy gunslinger.

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