How much would you pay to shoot (and keep) a red deer hind?

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Replies

  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,286 Senior Member
    A high fence "trophy" shoot of a genetically modified deer with as much effort put in as buying Cabelas Big Game Hunter and hanging it on the wall, is about the same as getting a tattoo. Just something to show off to someone who might be impressed seeing something that means nothing. I would rather take a doe in the back yard with a flintlock or own a scar that has a real story than either. At least to get them I did something other than throw money at it.

    As to rich people not being stupid? I agree. Contrary to popular opinion a wide majority of rich people didnt inherit their wealth, they worked for it. Though they are as ignorant, sometimes more so, as anyone else about things not in their purview. Sometimes being really good at something makes one think that they are good at everything. In the high fence hunt scenario, it would take that kind of ignorance to even consider a altered buck that was spoon fed to you a trophy to be proud of. Not even the same as being proud of a new Ferrari siting next to a Lamborghini. At least one earns those.
    I worked for a guy that had a bible under glass in his home. If auctioned, it would likely go for enough to buy and sell everyone here, and he EARNED every dime he had. That didnt make him the be all to end all in decision making in any other aspect except in his business.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,286 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »

    Now, shooting a freak of nature inside a cage....you may not be stupid, but youre a tool bag with a tiny penis.
    (Had to get a penis comment in. I was tasked with such)
    Was the full length mirror tilted down this morning when you got out of the shower? You have answered every thread today with remarks about skeeter shanks...
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,192 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    There's an enormous difference on going on a guided hunt, and going to a zoo (high fence operation) to shoot a "trophy".
    Guided hunts aren't for me, and wouldn't be unless I win the lottery. And even then, I'm independent enough I'd "waste"10 times the time and money to learn the land, and find the animals and do it myself. Some would rather just have the guide to the work. That's cool. It just ain't me. "But Chris you may waste 3 years trying to find an animal to hunt!"
    So? I don't hunt to kill animals. They are a bonus.

    Now, shooting a freak of nature inside a cage....you may not be stupid, but youre a tool bag with a tiny penis.
    (Had to get a penis comment in. I was tasked with such)

    You don't know much about game ranching operations if you think that it's shooting animals in a cage. At least on the ones I know about, it's a couple hundred acres to each 'cage' with lots of thick cover and varying terrain inside them- abnd without the guide you won't see jack. My best friend worked as a guide on a few of the really big ranches in Texas (was actually Dale Earnhardt's guide on 3 hunts), and I have been on a doe cull on one of the ranches. When you see one in a real cage, it's usually for breeding purposes, or for selling the animal to another ranch.

    And yes- there are big companies that do big hunts and invite clients to go on hunts (with celebrities like the above mentioned stock car driver) where the big company (Budweiser in this case) paid for people to get the chance to hunt once in a lifetime whitetail deer and exotic african animals. It's a big business.

    Neat fact- there are more Nilgai antilope in Texas then there are in it's native africa. Before the game ranches in TX got interested in the nilgai, it was endangered, and on its way to extinction. Some ranches bought some breeding stock from zoos, and brought the "turkey bearded devil cows" off the endangered list and made them a huge moneymaker here.

    Would I pay to go shoot an animal on a game ranch? Maybe. I don't need to at this point, but I would sure as hell go to one here for exotics before I would go to Africa to shoot a safari animal. Close to home, no weird laws on guns, i actually get the meat off of MY animal, and not leaving the US where the chances of getting thrown in a 3rd world jail or kidnapped for ransom.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • cpjcpj Senior Member Posts: 37,368 Senior Member
    Never been to a "game ranch", but fact is, it's 200 acres of cage, period. Thick? Meh. Ain't gonna be that difficult to find your quarry. Stumble around long enough, and you'll succeed.
    And even if it IS tough, and you did hire a guide, you KNOW the deer/critter will be there. You'll get to see the pics the ranch owner has taken, and specifically target the critter. It's no different than claiming you scored with a hot chick in Vegas. But that hot chick was a hooker you selected on the whore house website. You just can't show pics to just anyone of the one you bagged. And posing for selfies may be frowned upon. And of course there's the itching, rash, etc. So maybe it's similar, not "no different "
    "I'm here for the guns, hunting, and skirt wearing men."
    Zee
  • cpjcpj Senior Member Posts: 37,368 Senior Member
    Was the full length mirror tilted down this morning when you got out of the shower? You have answered every thread today with remarks about skeeter shanks...

    Theres skeeter on my peter, get it off.
    There's a skeeter on my peter, get it off.
    There's a thousand more a comin
    I can hear them all a buzzin
    There's a skeeter on my peter get it off!
    "I'm here for the guns, hunting, and skirt wearing men."
    Zee
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,077 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Never been to a "game ranch", but fact is, it's 200 acres of cage, period. Thick? Meh. Ain't gonna be that difficult to find your quarry. Stumble around long enough, and you'll succeed.
    And even if it IS tough, and you did hire a guide, you KNOW the deer/critter will be there. You'll get to see the pics the ranch owner has taken, and specifically target the critter. It's no different than claiming you scored with a hot chick in Vegas. But that hot chick was a hooker you selected on the whore house website. You just can't show pics to just anyone of the one you bagged. And posing for selfies may be frowned upon. And of course there's the itching, rash, etc. So maybe it's similar, not "no different "

    Oh well, at least you made one post without making a comment about penis size.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,192 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Never been to a "game ranch", but fact is, it's 200 acres of cage, period. Thick? Meh. Ain't gonna be that difficult to find your quarry. Stumble around long enough, and you'll succeed.
    And even if it IS tough, and you did hire a guide, you KNOW the deer/critter will be there. You'll get to see the pics the ranch owner has taken, and specifically target the critter. It's no different than claiming you scored with a hot chick in Vegas. But that hot chick was a hooker you selected on the whore house website. You just can't show pics to just anyone of the one you bagged. And posing for selfies may be frowned upon. And of course there's the itching, rash, etc. So maybe it's similar, not "no different "

    Yep. You don't know how the game ranches work.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 1,217 Senior Member
    Most high fence ranches are a minimum of 1200 plus acres or two square miles. When my knuckle head neighbor high fenced his 408 acres eighteen months ago our local are game biologists told him that it was too small of a section to high fence along with a number of reasons why. He told him the minimum preferred to high was around 1200 acres. Now each ranch is different but most of these high fence ranches have a lot of $$$ invested in their operations. The cost of the high fence is crazy, it cost my neighbor $140K to high fence his 408 acres. Then you have the cost of putting high quality trophy game on it. We have a trophy whitetail breeder just outside Archery City TX about 30 min away from me. I've got lots of pics of these freaks of nature whitetails which are all well into the 200 plus class range deer. I asked how much those would cost to put on a ranch and was told $3500 to $8K. That's just to purchase them. Then there's the cost of the high quality protein feed among many other aspects of their operations.

    Like I said earlier, it's a rich mans game to hunt some of these places. Though not all of these ranches are this expensive, there's ranches to fit most every budget out there! i've got a buddy who charges $100 a day to hog hunt on his place, he wants the hogs gone but enjoys making a few bucks out it. Exoctic's can be relatively cheap to hunt depending on the animal. All comes down to wants and needs and if you can afford it.
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,286 Senior Member
    bullsi1911 wrote: »
    You don't know much about game ranching operations if you think that it's shooting animals in a cage. At least on the ones I know about, it's a couple hundred acres to each 'cage' with lots of thick cover and varying terrain inside them- abnd without the guide you won't see jack. My best friend worked as a guide on a few of the really big ranches in Texas (was actually Dale Earnhardt's guide on 3 hunts), and I have been on a doe cull on one of the ranches. When you see one in a real cage, it's usually for breeding purposes, or for selling the animal to another ranch.
    Not so fast.

    The only one I have ever been to was the one that had the pigs. The pigs were in a pen, a HUGE pen so the odds were pretty good of getting one, but not 100% and you did work for it. The exotics on the other hand were in a pasture, and it wasnt a huge pasture. The guide said it was pay (a lot), get driven to the critter, shoot, then they take care of the carcass. Drive within 30 yards of a buffalo, shoot it, watch it fall, get driven back to the lodge.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,286 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Theres skeeter on my peter, get it off.
    There's a skeeter on my peter, get it off.
    There's a thousand more a comin
    I can hear them all a buzzin
    There's a skeeter on my peter get it off!
    Theres a skeeter on my peter knock it off
    Theres a skeeter on my peter knock it off
    Theres a dozen on my cousin you can hear them ......ers buzzin
    Theres a skeeter on my peter knock it off

    One of those things you learn at 8y/o and never forget.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,192 Senior Member
    Not so fast.

    The only one I have ever been to was the one that had the pigs. The pigs were in a pen, a HUGE pen so the odds were pretty good of getting one, but not 100% and you did work for it. The exotics on the other hand were in a pasture, and it wasnt a huge pasture. The guide said it was pay (a lot), get driven to the critter, shoot, then they take care of the carcass. Drive within 30 yards of a buffalo, shoot it, watch it fall, get driven back to the lodge.

    I grew up in the middle of hundreds of game ranches- some of them world famous (my sister managed part of the YO Ranch in Mountain Home, TX, my buddy worked at a few including the 777 in Hondo, TZ). Never heard of such a thing- what you mentioned is just not done. I'm surprised anyone would pay for such a thing.

    Now, I have heard of pig eradication programs where they trap the pigs into a portable corral and then gun them down, donate what meat they can, and feed the buzzards the rest. But that's not something that anyone would pay a guiding fee for.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 1,217 Senior Member
    Not so fast.

    The only one I have ever been to was the one that had the pigs. The pigs were in a pen, a HUGE pen so the odds were pretty good of getting one, but not 100% and you did work for it. The exotics on the other hand were in a pasture, and it wasnt a huge pasture. The guide said it was pay (a lot), get driven to the critter, shoot, then they take care of the carcass. Drive within 30 yards of a buffalo, shoot it, watch it fall, get driven back to the lodge.

    I have never heard of any ranches or outfits like you described in the great state of Texas. My buddy who charges $100 a day to hunt has 515 acres in Palo Pinto county. Lots of thick cedars but some very open areas. He tells folks it's a fair chase hunt and no guarantees to see, shoot or kill anything. He told me he has about a 65% success rate depending on how the weather goes.

    Can you name a few of the ones you've been to? I heard horror stories about some of the buffalo hunts in WY that they were a drive up and shoot. My buffalo hunt was on 18000 acres and I worked my rear end off to get my shot. No animals in pens. Not saying those pen hunt places don't exist but I've never heard or seen any of them and never heard of one in Texas.
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,077 Senior Member
    Jeff in TX wrote: »
    I have never heard of any ranches or outfits like you described in the great state of Texas. My buddy who charges $100 a day to hunt has 515 acres in Palo Pinto county. Lots of thick cedars but some very open areas. He tells folks it's a fair chase hunt and no guarantees to see, shoot or kill anything. He told me he has about a 65% success rate depending on how the weather goes.

    Can you name a few of the ones you've been to? I heard horror stories about some of the buffalo hunts in WY that they were a drive up and shoot. My buffalo hunt was on 18000 acres and I worked my rear end off to get my shot. No animals in pens. Not saying those pen hunt places don't exist but I've never heard or seen any of them and never heard of one in Texas.

    Linefinder and I did one of those drive up and shoot buffalo outings in southern Colorado. As I've said before, I did it mostly for the meat, and have never made any pretense of it being a hunt. I also wanted to see how my 338x284 performed. At 30 yards on a 600-700 lb. cow, it did ok.

    I never had any desire to do another one, though. For one thing, it did not produce cheap meat, and I discovered that eating bison gets olds after a while.

    I wouldn't call it a horror story, but I definitely wouldn't call it a hunt, either.

    The same landowner who did the shoot had another pasture with some free ranging bulls. He claimed that taking one of those was much more of a challenge, and by no means a sure thing. I wouldn't want to do that, either.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 9,462 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    Some may be willing to pay $25K for an animal.

    I am am not one of those "some".

    I am not even willing to pay $1K for a red deer hind. So, I might screw your results.

    If I paid $1K, I would want the entire deer, not just the hind.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 1,217 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    Linefinder and I did one of those drive up and shoot buffalo outings in southern Colorado. As I've said before, I did it mostly for the meat, and have never made any pretense of it being a hunt. I also wanted to see how my 338x284 performed. At 30 yards on a 600-700 lb. cow, it did ok.

    I never had any desire to do another one, though. For one thing, it did not produce cheap meat, and I discovered that eating bison gets olds after a while.

    I wouldn't call it a horror story, but I definitely wouldn't call it a hunt, either.

    The same landowner who did the shoot had another pasture with some free ranging bulls. He claimed that taking one of those was much more of a challenge, and by no means a sure thing. I wouldn't want to do that, either.

    Lindfinder told me about y'all's hunt after I posted the successful story of my hunt. I'm not sure I could do a pen hunt, would rather just go to an auction sale and purchase the animal and take it to a butcher, but on the flip side if it's pretty cool to see how a particular bullet/load/caliber would do on a large animal.

    We're waiting to see if we get drawn for the fall of 2018 buffalo hunt. Should know by the end of the month.
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 19,185 Senior Member
    Folks, I cull for "game ranches".

    I show up, they tell me what they need to take off their ranch to maintain a well balanced herd. I go to a likely location and throw out corn or feed to a desirable distance. I lay on the ground or get in a blind of some sort.

    Under such circumstances, I have seen immaculate whitetail bucks, African game, exotics, and what have you. It's quite amazing.

    But, I am there to do a job. And that is to thin the herd of whatever the particular animal is at the time. Folks.........it ain't that hard. Shooting a monster buck is actually quite easy. Selectively culling the right doe or cull buck sometimes takes a few attempts. Either way. It's fun to be outside. It's fun to do ballistic testing. And sometimes, it's fun to allow my boy to get the experience of taking game or just hanging out with me.

    Is it worth paying for that opportunity?

    Seeing as how I have a "particular set of skills", I don't have to pay. But then, I don't get to shoot the monsters either. Just the riff raft.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 19,185 Senior Member
    Then again, my boy has been offered a nice axis buck this season because of my help with the herd.
    . Maybe not a "trophy buck" by monetary standards. But, more than I have ever been offered. And I am absolutely ok with that! I would rather him get the chance than I any day. Will it be from a high fence operation? Yep. Do I care? Nope. Am I paying for it with money? Not a chance.

    Just time and attention to keep a place running. The dividend is him getting a shot at a nice axis buck. For a young boy, I'm ok with that.

    I never had had those chances as a kid. But then, he may never shoot a Rocky Mountain Elk like I have.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,182 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    I never had had those chances as a kid. But then, he may never shoot a Rocky Mountain Elk like I have.

    I certainly hope he gets the chance to hunt them.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Im not a trophy hunter. I've only shot two antlered ungulates in my life. The only big game I've even photographed after a hunt was my Dad's.

    To me it's about participating in the pursuit, and the adventures that entailes. I might pay a nominal fee to see a red deer or watch someone else shoot it, but I might not.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,704 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    Then again, my boy has been offered a nice axis buck this season because of my help with the herd.
    . Maybe not a "trophy buck" by monetary standards. But, more than I have ever been offered. And I am absolutely ok with that! I would rather him get the chance than I any day. Will it be from a high fence operation? Yep. Do I care? Nope. Am I paying for it with money? Not a chance.

    Just time and attention to keep a place running. The dividend is him getting a shot at a nice axis buck. For a young boy, I'm ok with that.

    I never had had those chances as a kid. But then, he may never shoot a Rocky Mountain Elk like I have.

    Your boy is already very fortunate just having you as a dad. My only hunting memory with my dad was him standing next to a buck I shot while pretending it was his. He just did it for fun, but my point is that my dad was not much of an outdoorsman and we shared little in common interests. You probably spend more quality time with your boy in one month than I did with my dad in your average year which is wonderful in and of itself!
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,939 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Exactly, so assuming someone is stupid because they can pay a lot of money for a throphy makes no sense to me. I can say from personal experience I have not met a lot of stupid rich people. But I do believe the ones that are get a lot of press. I don't believe they are the majority.

    The only ones I can think of live in a place called Hollywood California, or at least work there. I think it must have something to do with the air there. Or maybe the stress from living so close to that big fault line.

    :tooth:
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,341 Senior Member
    Years ago, I gauged interest on here with a few guys about a group red hind hunt in TX, iirc it was $3-400 per hind. Even today I'm seeing $500 +/- as they're considered add-ons or cull/ meat hunts. Mostly to thin the herd. 1k is outrageous.

    The 1 time i hunted a private ranch it was 18k acres, and I was amazed how big it actually is when you're boots are on on the ground. Only saw a fence once, because we worked a canyon next to the property line. Now this was wide open prairie, I imagine even 1/4 of that size, if dense and thick with vegetation, Could make things interesting.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,341 Senior Member
    As to the Africa costs, you're paying for an experience that you just cannot get anywhere else. Its cheaper to fly there and shoot 6-15 animals than it is to shoot 1 eland in TX. Its cheaper to do most ANY plains game package then it is for near ANY north American trophy.

    Skip the taxidermy (biggest hidden cost) and shoot more animals, or go a 2nd time. Dip & packing the animals, transfer to a broker, transfer to a taxidermy shop if having it done, the shipping materials, customs forms, actual shipping charges, dealing with US customs, USF&W if you have any CITES list animals, getting it from port of entry to YOUR door or your taxidermist....4-5 basic plains game is likely going to cost you 4-7k all said and done, extra. Go euro mount if you must, and you're looking 1-4k. Or, take lots of pictures, have them professionally blown up and framed, hang THAT in your den.....and go back to Africa again
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,704 Senior Member
    Jeff in TX wrote: »
    My buddy has been twice to Africa hunting. Our kids we're younger and I couldn't afford to go. Yes, the airfares can be pricey but the main issue is staying off of the trigger. he said you need to go with X kinds of animals to shoot be it a wildebeest, types of plains antelopes or what have you and stick with it. Most hunts run in the $2K range for a given number of plains animals. But then your guide catches you in the moment where they see a huge wart hog. They say he's only $450, then you see a hyena and they say he's only $400. My buddy said most of the hunters who were planning on $2 or $3K hunts spend $5 to $7k because they couldn't stay off of the trigger. Next is the taxidermy of the animals which isn't that bad price wise. However it will cost you 1.5 to 2 times the cost of the taxidermy animal to ship back to the US. My buddies shipping cost from his last trip exceeded $3K.

    His advice for an African plains hunt is to budget $10K and you'll have the time of your life and trophies to bring home. BTW a cape buffalo hunt is around $15K to $20K plus trophy fees for a 10 day hunt. Elephants can fetch $20 to $25K plus trophy fees. It's a rich mans hunt!


    One of my friends went to Africa with his wife for a plains game Safari. He was having so much fun he just kept shooting stuff. His trophy room has 52 animals from that trip... Even he will admit he got a little carried away :tooth:
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,286 Senior Member
    Jeff in TX wrote: »
    Can you name a few of the ones you've been to? I heard horror stories about some of the buffalo hunts in WY that they were a drive up and shoot. My buffalo hunt was on 18000 acres and I worked my rear end off to get my shot. No animals in pens. Not saying those pen hunt places don't exist but I've never heard or seen any of them and never heard of one in Texas.
    The 1 ranch I went to for pigs had a separate "grassland" for exotics. After our pig hunt the guide took us to the pasture and we drove up on every critter there and he described how it was done, and answered yes to the question about people actually paying huge amounts of money for this.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,704 Senior Member
    The 1 ranch I went to for pigs had a separate "grassland" for exotics. After our pig hunt the guide took us to the pasture and we drove up on every critter there and he described how it was done, and answered yes to the question about people actually paying huge amounts of money for this.

    Was this in TX or PA? No personal experience but I have heard that a couple of the hunting "preserves" in PA are exactly what you described.
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,021 Senior Member
    Here's a pic from my one and only canned hunt. Back before feral hogs got to be an epidemic, a bunch of people near Crossville Tennessee ran high-fenced areas and basically farmed the remnants of the Russian boars that were imported a hundred years ago for private hunting lodges. The result of those animals crossing with free-range domestic pigs in the area resulted in some pretty big crossbreeds.

    Hog_Hunt_020.jpg

    That's part of the high fence behind me, but toward the middle of the 500 acres, there was more challenging terrain. The entire experience was pretty disappointing, and I don't intend to ever try it again. There were a bunch of hidden fees involved, mostly for "processing" the kill, and I ended up with a couple of coolers full of mediocre sausage for my money. That 225 lb. sow ended up costing me around $600.00 and the "hunt" was over in about two hours. I was sitting on a big rock overlooking a well-traveled trail when one of the "guides" came blasting up on an ATV and insisted that I come shoot a pig their dogs had cornered in the root ball of a blowdown tree. I made the shot from about 15 yards- - - -no actual "hunting involved, other than making sure I didn't shoot one of the dogs!

    The same lodge offered various exotics, mostly African antelope for outrageous prices, but if my hunt was any example, it wouldn't have appealed to me at all.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,286 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Was this in TX or PA? No personal experience but I have heard that a couple of the hunting "preserves" in PA are exactly what you described.

    TN

    It would definitely take a person who was pretty full of themselves to take anything like that for a trophy. I have heard the same. I think there is a place just north of me that has pens. The more dollars, the bigger the critter. Walk through between the pens and pick your target.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,286 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Here's a pic from my one and only canned hunt. Back before feral hogs got to be an epidemic, a bunch of people near Crossville Tennessee ran high-fenced areas and basically farmed the remnants of the Russian boars that were imported a hundred years ago for private hunting lodges. The result of those animals crossing with free-range domestic pigs in the area resulted in some pretty big crossbreeds.


    The same lodge offered various exotics, mostly African antelope for outrageous prices, but if my hunt was any example, it wouldn't have appealed to me at all.
    Jerry
    Loshbough?

    If so that is the one I went to. We went in the summer and there was no one else there. The pen is now 700+ ac and while there is a real good chance you will get one, with no one else around you have to work some. We tried dogs for one just for the experience and we covered 8.1 miles chasing the dogs around. Next day we went back to stalking. It wasnt hard, but is was far harder than sitting at a bait pile. I would do pigs again there.

    The exotics are across the road in a pasture.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,021 Senior Member
    Loshbough?

    That name doesn't ring a bell, but I don't remember the name of the place I went. It was a little northeast of Monterey TN, just on the western edge of the Cumberland Plateau. That area was the location of several hunting clubs owned by wealthy damyankees around the turn of the 20th. Century. They imported Russian boars to hunt. Those animals promptly escaped their enclosures and commenced to do what all hogs do- - - -breed everything in sight including the local free-range domestic pigs. In the 1960's some enterprising landowners erected high fences and started selling guided hunts. They would live trap and swap hogs amongst themselves to build up a huntable population and replenish their stock. Sometime later the same lodge operators started offering African game at outrageous prices. At one time I had the website of the lodge I visited saved, but that went away with a hard drive crash 2 or 3 computers ago.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
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