Strangest thing you've ever eaten

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Replies

  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 13,765 Senior Member
    LMLarsen wrote: »
    Braunschweiger maybe?

    No....this was just lean ground beef with spices and diced onions....called Parisa IIRC.....
    A similar German preparation is called Mett....but that's made with raw pork....which you won't catch me sampling any time soon...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,738 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    No....this was just lean ground beef with spices and diced onions....called Parisa IIRC.....
    A similar German preparation is called Mett....but that's made with raw pork....which you won't catch me sampling any time soon...
    In France it’s called steak tartare and it’s served with a raw egg on it and it rocks!!! The beef has to be ABSOLUTELY Fresh ground. Even one day old ground beef tastes bad. In Montreal in a really nice French restaurant I had buffalo tartare and it was AMAZING!!!
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,144 Senior Member
    Almost forgot that most abroad consider Guine pigs as pets rather as edible livestock. In the cold, steep, oxigen-depleted rocky wastelands of our Andean mountains people living ther in almost stone-age conditions and surviving in very basic agriculture, they are almost the only protein source they can afford, since llmas and such are raised for their wool rather than their meat. Have eaten both but very sparsely, usually in stew or baked in mud ovens; local rural population usually feast on them and although good to eat, I'd rather go for any other option.

    European in-laws eat Escargots and cow brains....no thanks; would rather go for other cattle organs like tounge, kidneys, blood, stomack or else, but refuse to even taste udders and testicles.

    Raw fish & seafood is big down here; Sushi is among my favorites and ceviche is pretty much the national dish. It's usually made using fresh white sea fish fillets cut in 2x1" strips dipped in feshly squeezed lime juice (Of a local variety, small, green and very acid) with some salt, sliced red onion and chopped chiles, usually with a side order of boiled sweet potaotes or seaweed; let the fish get "cured" by the lemon's acid for a few minutes and off you go!
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,946 Senior Member
    Antonio wrote: »
    Almost forgot that most abroad consider Guine pigs as pets rather as edible livestock. In the cold, steep, oxigen-depleted rocky wastelands of our Andean mountains people living ther in almost stone-age conditions and surviving in very basic agriculture, they are almost the only protein source they can afford, since llmas and such are raised for their wool rather than their meat. Have eaten both but very sparsely, usually in stew or baked in mud ovens; local rural population usually feast on them and although good to eat, I'd rather go for any other option.

    European in-laws eat Escargots and cow brains....no thanks; would rather go for other cattle organs like tounge, kidneys, blood, stomack or else, but refuse to even taste udders and testicles.

    Raw fish & seafood is big down here; Sushi is among my favorites and ceviche is pretty much the national dish. It's usually made using fresh white sea fish fillets cut in 2x1" strips dipped in feshly squeezed lime juice (Of a local variety, small, green and very acid) with some salt, sliced red onion and chopped chiles, usually with a side order of boiled sweet potaotes or seaweed; let the fish get "cured" by the lemon's acid for a few minutes and off you go!

    The small limeish thingis you mention sounds like calamansie which is what it's called in the Philippines. It's a little bigger than a cherry tomato, some are about that same size. The Calamansie is actually more akin to an orange but like you described is very acidy and tart, in other words sour. They really sound the same. And seeing they are found throughout the Tropics, I wouldn't be surprised if we're talking about the same citrus fruit.

    In the Philippines the equivalent of Ceviche is called Kinilaw. It can be made by marinating the fish in Calamansie or vinegar or a combination. Recipes vary a lot down there. I have a brother in law there or rather ex brother in law that made some out of jelly fish once. I think I offended him because I wouldn't try it, but though I've eaten many weird things, I do have my limits.

    I suppose you know what Tripas are. You probably eat them down there, but in case you don't recognize the name, it's the small intestines of a cow(Washed out real good and boiled for an hour or so). The Mexicans (and now a lot of us Bolios are catching on), then cook them in a tractor disk. You weld two 10"-12" tractor disk on a piece of rebar. One about 6-8 inches below the other with enough of the bar to stick in the ground sticking out the bottom. Stick it in the ground upright and then you put hot coals in the lower disk and the Tripas in the top one and let it cook or fry actually. Tripas Tacos are a big thing down here. Role em up in a flour Tortilla and throw a little Pico de Gallo on it and you have yourself a real treat.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • bobbyrlf3bobbyrlf3 Senior Member Posts: 2,420 Senior Member
    Bear is as out there as I go. I've had bear ribs and bear stew.

    I have a standing rule to not eat anything I can't identify.
    Knowledge is essential to living freely and fully; understanding gives knowledge purpose and strength; wisdom is combining the two and applying them appropriately in words and actions.
  • 1911LVR1911LVR New Member Posts: 6 New Member
    I once plucked a cherry from King Neptune's belly!

    .... actually it was a greasy olive sitting in a fat man's grease-smeared navel... had to pluck it out with my teeth and eat it. In my defense, it was part of the Shellback initiation while I was in the Navy. They ran out of cherries and switched to olives. It also explains why I've never been able to eat olives since then. :)
    US Navy Veteran * NRA and GOA Member
    =================================
    Praise the Gods, Do Good, Act Bravely
  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 1,171 Senior Member
    1911LVR wrote: »
    I once plucked a cherry from King Neptune's belly!

    .... actually it was a greasy olive sitting in a fat man's grease-smeared navel... had to pluck it out with my teeth and eat it. In my defense, it was part of the Shellback initiation while I was in the Navy. They ran out of cherries and switched to olives. It also explains why I've never been able to eat olives since then. :)

    I think you just won the Christmas goose with that story. Now might be a good time for some group therapy.
    :group:

    And welcome aboard.
    "Facts are stubborn things and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of the facts and evidence" — John Adams
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,946 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 wrote: »
    I did have some deep fried turkey testicles at an NWTF fundraiser last summer.

    That"s sort of a thing around certain parts here. You can buy em around Cuero which is about 30 miles north of Victoria because there's a lot of Turkey houses up that way where they raise domestic turkeys. They're pretty good. They call em Turkey fries.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 9,571 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    That"s sort of a thing around certain parts here. You can buy em around Cuero which is about 30 miles north of Victoria because there's a lot of Turkey houses up that way where they raise domestic turkeys. They're pretty good. They call em Turkey fries.

    They tasted like breading and seasoning to me:jester:
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,144 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    The small limeish thingis you mention sounds like calamansie which is what it's called in the Philippines. It's a little bigger than a cherry tomato, some are about that same size. The Calamansie is actually more akin to an orange but like you described is very acidy and tart, in other words sour. They really sound the same. And seeing they are found throughout the Tropics, I wouldn't be surprised if we're talking about the same citrus fruit.

    In the Philippines the equivalent of Ceviche is called Kinilaw. It can be made by marinating the fish in Calamansie or vinegar or a combination. Recipes vary a lot down there. I have a brother in law there or rather ex brother in law that made some out of jelly fish once. I think I offended him because I wouldn't try it, but though I've eaten many weird things, I do have my limits.

    I suppose you know what Tripas are. You probably eat them down there, but in case you don't recognize the name, it's the small intestines of a cow(Washed out real good and boiled for an hour or so). The Mexicans (and now a lot of us Bolios are catching on), then cook them in a tractor disk. You weld two 10"-12" tractor disk on a piece of rebar. One about 6-8 inches below the other with enough of the bar to stick in the ground sticking out the bottom. Stick it in the ground upright and then you put hot coals in the lower disk and the Tripas in the top one and let it cook or fry actually. Tripas Tacos are a big thing down here. Role em up in a flour Tortilla and throw a little Pico de Gallo on it and you have yourself a real treat.

    Our lemon isn't as little as a cherry tomato, but probably fo the same average size of a ping-pong ball; might have the same acidic level of the Phillipine fruit you describe and have only seen something close ot it in Chile (Called "De pica" lemon) and maybe in Mexico.

    The "tripas" (Guts) are called "Chinchulines" here and in Argentina (Can't recall the name in Chile but it's probably pretty much the same); usually they're used finely chopped in soups or grilled in small 4" long strips and I like them in any way.

    I know the plowing disk cooking style you describe from Chile (Haven't seen it here yet), but they usually throw assorted chopped meats, cabbage, onions, potatoes, carrots, tomatoes, etc. along with some olive oil, red vinegar, salt and a little beer. Tasty local treat the in-laws usually throw in their country house which I hope to enjoy again this April!
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,115 Senior Member
    Antonio wrote: »
    Our lemon isn't as little as a cherry tomato, but probably fo the same average size of a ping-pong ball; might have the same acidic level of the Phillipine fruit you describe and have only seen something close ot it in Chile (Called "De pica" lemon) and maybe in Mexico.


    The tart little citrus fruit you guys are talking about sounds like our kumquats.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,738 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    The tart little citrus fruit you guys are talking about sounds like our kumquats.
    In most of the Caribbean countries and Mexico what is normally referred to as lemons are closer to the Key Lime that Floridians are very well aquatinted with. Thin green skin (that will become yellow if allowed to tree ripen) and HIGH acidity. The thick skinned yellow little footballs we have in the mainland are basically unknown in the tropics.
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 31,180 Senior Member
    In some regions of Germany they would sometimes use a swing to cook meat. A grill on chains over a fire slowly swinging and cooking (Schwenkbraten schwenk= swinging arm)

    Around Idar Oberstein (I worked there on Strasbourg Kaserne and lived in Baumholder) where they cut diamonds/ have exchanges and are known for learning that cooking method from South America where the miners went for work.

    Very good eats. Bruce Willis was born there. I didn't know that or forgot if I did.

    http://kitchenproject.com/german/recipes/Spiessbraten/History-Spiessbraten-Schwenkbraten.htm
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
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  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,144 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    In most of the Caribbean countries and Mexico what is normally referred to as lemons are closer to the Key Lime that Floridians are very well aquatinted with. Thin green skin (that will become yellow if allowed to tree ripen) and HIGH acidity. The thick skinned yellow little footballs we have in the mainland are basically unknown in the tropics.

    Indeed. In Ecuador and Chile if I properly recall they use the big, less acidic yellow lemon for their version of ceviche and results are FAR from ideal.

    Now, there's a local old colonial dessert made out of these "Key limes" that is probably one of the few sweets that I crave for: You cut the lemons in half, dump the seeds and pull out the pulp, mixing it with a thick paste made out of condensed milk and sugar (Called "manjarblanco" here.....dunno the English denomination) and then cooked in a steam pressure pot for a while.....delicious!!
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,738 Senior Member
    Antonio wrote: »
    Indeed. In Ecuador and Chile if I properly recall they use the big, less acidic yellow lemon for their version of ceviche and results are FAR from ideal.

    Now, there's a local old colonial dessert made out of these "Key limes" that is probably one of the few sweets that I crave for: You cut the lemons in half, dump the seeds and pull out the pulp, mixing it with a thick paste made out of condensed milk and sugar (Called "manjarblanco" here.....dunno the English denomination) and then cooked in a steam pressure pot for a while.....delicious!!
    Oh man, my grandma used to make a version of that when regular milk would go bad that was amazing! I used to pray for bad milk :tooth:
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • RadiowaveRadiowave Posts: 8 New Member
    I once ate bangers and mash at an Irish pub without a beer or a whisky...
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,195 Senior Member
    Radiowave said:
    I once ate bangers and mash at an Irish pub without a beer or a whisky...
    Another copied post.  This is strange.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • Mrs_Mary_CelesteMrs_Mary_Celeste Posts: 21 New Member
    Radiowave said:
    I once ate bangers and mash at an Irish pub without a beer or a whisky...
    Another copied post.  This is strange.

    His he foreign in any way?
    Bangers sounds foreign.


  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,946 Senior Member
    Zee said:
    Dog
    Ants
    Termites
    Grasshopper
    Scorpion
    Crickets
    Javalina Boar
    Chipmunk
    Animal Bits & Pieces: Stomach/Intestines/Nuts/Liver/Udder/Eyes/Brains/Tongue/Kidneys/Heart/etc
    ****
    Carp
    Fly
    Moth
    Meal Worm

    I’m thinking......

    Jackrabbit
    Bear
    I ate a couple of flies and a few Mosquitoes. Taught me to keep my mouth shut while on a motor cycle.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • minnesotashooterminnesotashooter Senior Member Posts: 680 Senior Member
    Huitlacoche-
    Corn smut, fungus, Mexican truffle — these are just some of the aliases of huitlacoche(pronounced WHEE-tala-coach-A). But what exactly is this soft, spreadable and dark-as-night ingredient? In simple terms, it’s a plant disease that grows on ears of corn around the kernels in puffy, gray clouds that look kind of like river stones. But when you take this strange fungus into the culinary world, huitlacoche becomes a delicacy used in all sorts of dishes from soups to enchiladas to sauces.

    Nastiest stuff ever
  • Mrs_Mary_CelesteMrs_Mary_Celeste Posts: 21 New Member
    Radiowave said:
    I once ate bangers and mash at an Irish pub without a beer or a whisky...
    Another copied post.  This is strange.

    His he foreign in any way?
    Bangers sounds foreign.


    That does sound strange.

    Bangers and mash is more a british than an irish dish,coddle or colcannon, and crubeens are more native of ireland.

     

  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 1,679 Senior Member
    Had a meal down south from a lady I was seeing. It had all kinds of meats in it. I never asked what it was but after that we went out to eat all the time.Nice lady ......crappy cook.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,738 Senior Member
    When I lived in Louisiana I learned quickly that it was considered impolite to ask what was simmering in the gumbo pot 😁
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 4,114 Senior Member
    Bobcat, muskrat, and beaver is probably the weirdest by most standards. I've grown to enjoy beaver meat. 
    The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me.

    Ayn Rand
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 22,935 Senior Member
    No matter what you comment about on one of those critters; somebody will come up with a crude opinion.

    I have a need for speed
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 4,114 Senior Member
    NN said:
    No matter what you comment about on one of those critters; somebody will come up with a crude opinion.


    Yep. All of the trapping threads involving "one of those critters" devolved rather quickly. 
    The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me.

    Ayn Rand
  • coolwhipcoolwhip New Member Posts: 14 New Member
    ostrich med. rare the other red meat who knew ? 90% sure rat on a stick, dog LET ME EXPLAIN . s. korea squad takes new guy out gets said new guy smashed then all food is ordered in Korean. then they sit back and wait for the fun to begin. went back 3 or 4 times, dried squid,peanuts,mayo with beer. fermented seal flipper my dad sent me, just threwup in my mouth typing this! could not keep it down.30 + years ago local highschool closed for a weekfor noxious fumes source found in boys restroom a/c vent ..?????????
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 22,935 Senior Member
    CaliFFL said:
    NN said:
    No matter what you comment about on one of those critters; somebody will come up with a crude opinion.


    Yep. All of the trapping threads involving "one of those critters" devolved rather quickly. 

    I ate one, once, it was too greasy; but, it was a young one and seemed very fat as in marbled like a fat feed lot cow.
    I have a need for speed
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 4,114 Senior Member
    NN said:
    CaliFFL said:
    NN said:
    No matter what you comment about on one of those critters; somebody will come up with a crude opinion.


    Yep. All of the trapping threads involving "one of those critters" devolved rather quickly. 

    I ate one, once, it was too greasy; but, it was a young one and seemed very fat as in marbled like a fat feed lot cow.
    They are like bears in the spring...the meat is way leaner in spring after the long winter. 
    The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me.

    Ayn Rand
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