What kind of thinner goes with True Oil? I want to put it on thin so...

snake284snake284 Senior MemberPosts: 20,940 Senior Member
so the wood soaks it up better. I've got a stock coming for my newest build, the 7x57 on a Zastava action. I want this to be classic looking, hand rubbed oil and blue steel. I'm going to be in no rush to finish this one so want it near if not perfect.
Daddy, what's an enabler?
Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.

Replies

  • cpjcpj Senior Member Posts: 37,377 Senior Member
    Looking at the stocks that Big Al has done, and I'm fairly certain he doesn't thin his....do what HE does.
    "I'm here for the guns, hunting, and skirt wearing men."
    Zee
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,940 Senior Member
    I've never thinned it before but want to try it. And wet sand a few coats to help fill the grain. Then hit it with 400 to take off the gloss and 600 to polish.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 1,675 Senior Member
    I have followed Als instructions & am almost ready for final coat . He knows his stuff & is willing to help ......(.even know nothings like myself.)
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,026 Senior Member
    The only place I've seen people use thinned oil is for penetrating to the very bottom of checkering. Get a small bottle of "odorless" mineral spirits that oil paint artists use, and don't overdo it on the thinning. A stiff-bristle artist's paint brush helps get the oil finish into any crevices. On smooth areas of the wood, dip your fingertips into the oil and apply it to the wood sparingly, then rub it in until the wood gets warm to the touch. Then do it again- - - - -and again- - - - -and again- - - - -etc. When the wood won't take any more oil, let it dry a week or so and give the wood a rubdown with 4-O steel wool. do the finger dunk/rubdown sequence again- - - -and again- - - -and again. More steel wool- - - -more oil- - - -. Eventually you'll get to the point the wood won't take any more oil. Then apply a couple of coats of Johnson's Paste Wax, buffed between coats with an old bath towel.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 9,463 Senior Member
    I think lacquer thinner, but it's been so long since I finished a stock I don't remember. Never seen a need to use it that I can recall. You kinda need it thick to fill the pores before finishing. I'd just put it on and let it sink in. I use rottenstone and olive oil for the final finish.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 1,675 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    The only place I've seen people use thinned oil is for penetrating to the very bottom of checkering. Get a small bottle of "odorless" mineral spirits that oil paint artists use, and don't overdo it on the thinning. A stiff-bristle artist's paint brush helps get the oil finish into any crevices. On smooth areas of the wood, dip your fingertips into the oil and apply it to the wood sparingly, then rub it in until the wood gets warm to the touch. Then do it again- - - - -and again- - - - -and again- - - - -etc. When the wood won't take any more oil, let it dry a week or so and give the wood a rubdown with 4-O steel wool. do the finger dunk/rubdown sequence again- - - -and again- - - -and again. More steel wool- - - -more oil- - - -. Eventually you'll get to the point the wood won't take any more oil. Then apply a couple of coats of Johnson's Paste Wax, buffed between coats with an old bath towel.
    Jerry

    I stayed away from 0000 wool because of the fine steel getting in the finish......I went to 800 & 1000 paper then rub & wax.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,940 Senior Member
    Old Ron wrote: »
    I stayed away from 0000 wool because of the fine steel getting in the finish......I went to 800 & 1000 paper then rub & wax.

    I've done steel wool many times and had good luck with it, but you need a tac rag and patience.

    I don't plan to thin the oil all the way, just the first three or so coats for penetration.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 6,648 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    The only place I've seen people use thinned oil is for penetrating to the very bottom of checkering. Get a small bottle of "odorless" mineral spirits that oil paint artists use, and don't overdo it on the thinning. A stiff-bristle artist's paint brush helps get the oil finish into any crevices. On smooth areas of the wood, dip your fingertips into the oil and apply it to the wood sparingly, then rub it in until the wood gets warm to the touch. Then do it again- - - - -and again- - - - -and again- - - - -etc. When the wood won't take any more oil, let it dry a week or so and give the wood a rubdown with 4-O steel wool. do the finger dunk/rubdown sequence again- - - -and again- - - -and again. More steel wool- - - -more oil- - - -. Eventually you'll get to the point the wood won't take any more oil. Then apply a couple of coats of Johnson's Paste Wax, buffed between coats with an old bath towel.
    Jerry

    This, but I don't use steel wool.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    I can vouch for the PITA of steel wool. It leaves metal hairs behind in the finish. They're hard to clean up.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,026 Senior Member
    Are you degreasing the steel wool with alcohol or lacquer thinner first, like is done before carding a rust blue job? That seems to minimize the tendency to shed fibers, at least for me.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • hawk18hawk18 Senior Member Posts: 676 Senior Member
    I've used the same technique as Jerry on many stocks. If I've let the oil dry completely, I don't have any trouble with wool "hairs". Oil doesn't fill the grain very well, which I like. If you don't want any voids, use a filler and extra sanding. As to wet sanding an oil finish, I did that once to dull the sheen. It left the finish cloudy in places so I didn't do it again. YMMV.

    Hawk
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,026 Senior Member
    I believe impatience is the problem- - - - -if the oil on the stock is the least bit sticky, it attracts steel particles like a magnet. Apply, rub, hang the stock up to dry in a WARM place, and come back a week later.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 15,993 Senior Member
    I've found that TruOil needs to have fewer coats on checkering vis-a-vis smooth wood. I'm no expert, I've only done 2 or 3 sets of pistol grips and one rifle stock, so YMMV!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    Carry a 25 if it makes you feel good, but do not ever load it. If you load it, you may shoot it. If you shoot it, you may hit somebody, and if you hit somebody – and he finds out about it – he may be very angry with you. --Jeff Cooper
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Are you degreasing the steel wool with alcohol or lacquer thinner first, like is done before carding a rust blue job? That seems to minimize the tendency to shed fibers, at least for me.
    Jerry

    Nobody told me to:bang:
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • shooter10mmshooter10mm Member Posts: 215 Member
    Look......I'm a Shotgun competitor and the difference in Shotgun and Rifles/Pistols is the more expensive you get, the better grade of Claro or Turkish walnut you get! Fit for a shotgun shooting where you look is the most important thing to high scores, and I will and have taken a Farriers Rasp to a $15,000 Perazzi or Krieghoff while I'm on the course if I feel like I'm +/- ten pounds different from when I had the gun fitted to me. I'm always fond of an oil finished stock because of this "Adjustability".....
    All I use is Tru-Oil. I'll go from Rasp, to 60 or 120 grit, then hit it with 400 or 500 then real fine steel wool. Then with some blue dishwashing gloves start rubbing the hell out of it the first three nights. Then I will hit it again nightly for a total of 7 to 10 days depending on the wood quality. I have stock bolts to put in my vice to keep it stationary to dry after the 5th night I leave a fan on in the shop but to move air around but not on the stock. I don't use it but there's a sheen application too if you want a little shine but not a full blown lacquer bright finish and it'll kind of fill in any holes/imperfections for a slicker finish. After the oils set in then I'll hit it with a really high friction rub of a wax finish and let it set about another week before putting it back on the gun.
    I've had to sell many of these guns over time and no one has ever thought it was "Shade Tree Stockworks LLC" (That's what they call me when I'm on the course making adjustments lolol)...that finished the guns!!
    "You miss 100% of the shots you do not take!"
    "As long as there's Lead in the air there's hope!
    " -- Ralph Adkinson(Daddy) The original Marlboro Man
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,940 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Are you degreasing the steel wool with alcohol or lacquer thinner first, like is done before carding a rust blue job? That seems to minimize the tendency to shed fibers, at least for me.
    Jerry

    Good point, next time I use 0000 steel wool I'm going to try that.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • HAWKENHAWKEN Senior Member Posts: 1,659 Senior Member
    I do as Teach, with one exception. I cut the first one or two coats 50-50 with white shellac. This fills the pores quickly then hand rub with oil. The .50 caliber muzzleloader I built has 30 coats of hand rubbed linseed oil......robin
    I don't often talk to people that voted for Obama, but when I do I order large fries!
    Life member of the American Legion, the VFW, the NRA and the Masonic Lodge, retired LEO
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,940 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Good point, next time I use 0000 steel wool I'm going to try that.

    Hey everyone i want to say, I have read everybody's post and I will tell you these things all of them are the basics to me. I think everyone's ideas are similar. I must say what Teach and Al said here is very close to what I've always done, but they both have much more patience than me.

    However, and maybe I'm full of Bull feces, I have been listening to a guy who finishes things with oils and other products and he believes in thinning for the first few coats. So just for kicks I'm going to try it. He swears that thinner makes the oil penetrate better and during the first coats it will make a difference. I'm not sure if I believe everything I see so I will try it with guarded caution. That's why I wanted to know what thinner will work with oils. Teach said mineral spirits like artists use will thin it. Is this different from regular mineral spirits?
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,940 Senior Member
    zorba wrote: »
    I've found that TruOil needs to have fewer coats on checkering vis-a-vis smooth wood. I'm no expert, I've only done 2 or 3 sets of pistol grips and one rifle stock, so YMMV!

    Yes Zorba, I agree. Checkering by its nature needs fewer coats. Too many will start to fill in the points or sharp figures between the checkering points which will nullify the good that comes from checkering (Grip). That's why what Teach said makes sense. Thinned oil will soak in better and serve its purpose on checkering, not as a finish so much but more for protection. Checkering doesn't ever need a finish for looks because the checkring IS the look, so thinning is a good idea to get it to penetrate and protect the wood.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 15,993 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Yes Zorba, I agree. Checkering by its nature needs fewer coats. Too many will start to fill in the points or sharp figures between the checkering points which will nullify the good that comes from checkering (Grip). That's why what Teach said makes sense. Thinned oil will soak in better and serve its purpose on checkering, not as a finish so much but more for protection. Checkering doesn't ever need a finish for looks because the checkring IS the look, so thinning is a good idea to get it to penetrate and protect the wood.

    In my "vast experience" (NOT!), checkering looks "finished" with fewer coats than the smooth wood does - so I continued to add a couple of more coats to the smooth areas but not the checkering 'cause it would get clogged. I never thought about thinning the TruOil - maybe that's mo' bettah! TruOil is good stuff!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    Carry a 25 if it makes you feel good, but do not ever load it. If you load it, you may shoot it. If you shoot it, you may hit somebody, and if you hit somebody – and he finds out about it – he may be very angry with you. --Jeff Cooper

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