Someone help identify a s&w revolver

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Replies

  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,750 Senior Member
    Weatherby said:
    I'm stumped a big part of it is because of that serial number........... it doesn't seem to jive.............at all.

    See my post...
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 12,602 Senior Member
     It's not a J-frame.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,378 Senior Member
    Weatherby said:
    I'm stumped a big part of it is because of that serial number........... it doesn't seem to jive.............at all.

    See my post...
    I went and looked at it and it wouldn't have that upper screw by then.
    The serial number doesn't work..Only thing I can think of offhand is if S&W total rebuilt a gun
    in the 32 hand ejector 5th change range.
    I have a gun S&W did that with even happens to be 32 S&W long
  • cpjcpj Senior Member Posts: 37,404 Senior Member
    The cool thing about Smiths is the fact the model numbers all make perfect sense and are easy to identify. 👍
    "I'm here for the guns, hunting, and skirt wearing men."
    Zee
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 31,180 Senior Member
    Model 30 Kit Gun and now I too think it is an I frame leaning that way or maybe not. I thought they quit making them long before 1960 and 3 screws. but was wrong.

    Seems they made the .32s with both I (Improved frame) and J frames. The j frames would handle the .38 Spl cartridges.



     http://www.guns.com/2011/05/26/a-quick-guide-to-collecting-smith-a-wesson-revolvers/

    "Recently I acquired a handgun I’d rather not have. Barrie Gwillim, a shooting buddy and close friend, died last fall and left me a couple of handguns. The revolver is a S&W Regulation Police in .38 S&W made in 1956 or 1957, on the “Improved I-frame.” The I-frame had a cylinder nominally 1.25″ long and corresponding frame window. Production of I-frames continued during the ’50s, with revolvers chambered for .32 S&W Long, .38 S&W and the popular “Kit Guns” in .22 LR. In 1960-61, S&W dropped the I-frame in favor of the J-frame, which could chamber the longer .38 Special."

    https://americanhandgunner.com/the-32-sw-long-38-sw/







    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 31,180 Senior Member
    So with the 3 screws, which was dropped first the one in front of the trigger guard making it a 4 screw and then one of the 4 on the side plate making it a 3 screw?

    Then we have to figure out what dates were involved when those changes were made and keeping in mind it is not unusual to see old style revolvers from parts left over go past the cutoff dates.

     
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 31,180 Senior Member
    Well here are some dates to work with.

    http://www.guns.com/2011/05/26/a-quick-guide-to-collecting-smith-a-wesson-revolvers/

    "A question that comes up a lot is what are 5-screw, 4-screw, and 3-screw revolvers? From 1905 to 1955 most Smith & Wesson revolvers had five screws, four held on the side plate and one in front of the trigger guard. After 1955 the top side plate screw was eliminated, and from that time until 1961 the revolvers were known as 4-screw guns. After 1961 that trigger guard screw was done away with and from here after the revolvers were known as 3-screw guns. Recently Smith & Wesson started producing their classic line of revolvers with the topside plate screw like before 1955."

    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 31,180 Senior Member
    edited March 9 #39
    Is there a screw in front of the trigger guard???? The top side plate screw was dropped then years later the screw in front of the trigger guard.

     
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 31,180 Senior Member
    "The .32 caliber Hand Ejector and its Colt counterparts became standard among police departments around the world, but their supremacy was short lived. .38 Special revolvers were replacing these small guns by the time of the mobster era in the 1930s. However, a lack of concealable handguns in the .38 caliber kept the .32 around. By the end of World War II, little I frames in .32 S&W Long and .38 S&W were the only concealed handguns in Smith’s lineup, and they had fallen behind Colt in that market. The existing I frame could not handle .38 Special pressures. To address this shortcoming, Smith beefed it up and hence, the J frame was born. With that the I frame’s days were numbered. By 1974, they were completely out of production."

    OK, I learnt sumthang.

    https://loadoutroom.com/thearmsguide/birth-modern-wheelgun-smith-wesson-frame-revolver/


    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,378 Senior Member
    Big Chief I frames and the screw count was different. Those dates pertain to N&K frame revolvers. Some I frames were considered 6 screw ones.


  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 367 Member
    edited March 9 #42
    Yep on the screw in front of the trigger guard.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 31,180 Senior Member
    I had a friends .32 I frame for a few months.....cleaned it up best I could, was neglected by his family. Was about the most fun shootin I ever had with my reloads and cast bullets. Accurate little thing.

    My friend passed and I gave it back to his family in Tenn back in the 90s at his funeral.

    I don't remember how many screws it had or much else about it, though.  
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,750 Senior Member
    Yep on the screw in front of the trigger guard.
    That changes everything...
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 367 Member
    Yep on the screw in front of the trigger guard.
    That changes everything...
    I’m all ears. It’s rare that I get an older revolver that’s this danged hard to identify. I’d normally just order a thumb release and machine/alter it to fit but I told this guy id identify it for him. Plus it makes it easier to enter in my A&D book.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,750 Senior Member
    edited March 9 #46
    This means that it is a 5 screw and definitely not a J frame which makes you serial number a complete mystery...  The serial number should be 5 digits on the bottom of the grip frame, not 6.
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 981 Senior Member
    Maybe it's a priceless anomaly👀
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,378 Senior Member
    I'd try some acetone too and see about the barrel markings.
    Maybe a picture if the other side too. Is there a letter to the left before the serial on the butt ?
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 12,602 Senior Member
    edited March 9 #49
    This means that it is a 5 screw and definitely not a J frame which makes you serial number a complete mystery...  The serial number should be 5 digits on the bottom of the grip frame, not 6.
    The fact it has a leaf mainspring (which I pointed out earlier) means it's not a J-frame.

    The serial number listed here puts the handgun as a 1922 Smith.  Which means the ramp front sight is incorrect.  Should have a half-moon front sight.  If the serial number is correct.

    http://forums.gunsandammo.com/discussion/30432/good-links-for-conducting-research/p2

    The handgun may predate the whole "Model Number" system, and if so it predates the "dash number" system and gets you into the "Model of XXXX X Change" era. 

    Overkill is underrated.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 31,180 Senior Member
    edited March 9 #50
    I learned to never say never when it comes to S&Ws...........seen variations made for special runs, foreign markets and put together from parts/swapped around/repairs with different replacement parts from other models that fit that frame , but "Incorrect".

    Interesting little shooter, I hope you get it up to snuff and more pleasing to the eye.

     
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,378 Senior Member
    The gun is an oldie that dates to around 1915.The 2" barrel minimum is post WWII.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,750 Senior Member
    This means that it is a 5 screw and definitely not a J frame which makes you serial number a complete mystery...  The serial number should be 5 digits on the bottom of the grip frame, not 6.
    The fact it has a leaf mainspring (which I pointed out earlier) means it's not a J-frame.

    The serial number listed here puts the handgun as a 1922 Smith.  Which means the ramp front sight is incorrect.  Should have a half-moon front sight.  If the serial number is correct.

    http://forums.gunsandammo.com/discussion/30432/good-links-for-conducting-research/p2

    The handgun may predate the whole "Model Number" system, and if so it predates the "dash number" system and gets you into the "Model of XXXX X Change" era. 

    Good observation Monkey Boy.  As you can see in the closeup both the front sight and the ejection rod holder thingy were welded on later.  The barrel was cut down and someone welded the new style sight and new (what the hell do you call that thing?????) on.  They also cut the ejection rod down and turned some rings on it for better grip.  probably why the ugly rattle can job.  Camo for the weld job.  And I don't believe this is any kind of professional gun finish.  Looks like rattle can Krylon to me.


    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 9,467 Senior Member
    I don't think the ejector rod is long enough to extract fired rounds.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 367 Member
    I don’t know what the hell is coating this thing but it sure ain’t paint. You can’t even scratch it at all, plus laquer thinner and acetone hasn’t touched it so far. It’ll be getting blasted off definitely. The ejector rod does actually work quite well but you can see where at least the front sight was soldered on. If the barrel was cut down and the rod retainer soldered on, someone didn’t do a half bad job. I’m curious to see what I’ll find under this thick coating though. Maybe powder coat??? Seems this thing is old enough to be a mystery still in some ways though.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,750 Senior Member
    I don’t know what the hell is coating this thing but it sure ain’t paint. You can’t even scratch it at all, plus laquer thinner and acetone hasn’t touched it so far. It’ll be getting blasted off definitely. The ejector rod does actually work quite well but you can see where at least the front sight was soldered on. If the barrel was cut down and the rod retainer soldered on, someone didn’t do a half bad job. I’m curious to see what I’ll find under this thick coating though. Maybe powder coat??? Seems this thing is old enough to be a mystery still in some ways though.
    Whatever they used they laid it on THICK!!!  Normally duracoat and such has a nice smoot finish.  Maybe Cerakote?  Interesting piece...
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
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