Ballistol/Hoppes/CLP/Frog Lube

Big ChiefBig Chief Senior MemberPosts: 30,074 Senior Member
I just had Big Brown deliver a can of Ballistol. Any of you ever use it before? I never have.

For years I used Hoppes#9, still do sometimes. I have been using  CLP more lately and used it in thee Army and recently now on my guns.

So I thought I'd try Ballistol. What do you think of it?

Here is a very informative video on Ballistol/Hoppes/CLP/Frog Lube

 



It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
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Comments

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 444 Member
    Great for black powder, and wood. Smells like gym shoes. Water saluable. Good stuff.👍
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 1,072 Senior Member
    Sounds to me that Ballistol = Frog Lube. I too have only used CLP. Keep us posted on how it works for you & under what conditions. At the range I usually just take a light oil like 3&1. End of day cleaning it's CLP.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 444 Member
    Ballistol is particularly good with black powder residue because the high volume of solids left behind after ignition will harden and clump up when combined with petroleum based solvents or oils. It also helps remove any residual water after cleaning.
  • Uncle FesterUncle Fester Senior Member Posts: 923 Senior Member
    The Germans used it in WW1 and WWII.  I have had no negative issues since I started using it.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballistol
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,029 Senior Member
    Ballistic is amazing stuff!!! You’re going to love it.
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 30,074 Senior Member
    The worst case of leading I ever had was using cold swagged factory bullets driven over 900 FPS...........had more streaks than a pair of white tightie whities after a night of beer and raunchy chili!
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 21,468 Senior Member
    I love Ballistol. Great for general firearms cleaning, does a good job on cleaning up black powder firearms, and corrosive primed ammo residue, and is good as a storage wipedown to prevent rust. Great for your carbon steel tools that rust just looking at them, too.
    A double action revolver is a semiauto firearm. It fires once for every trigger pull.



  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 22,594 Senior Member
    Used it once----stunk-----cleaned out some leading well enough.

    Put the can up, can't remember where up is
    My new Signature
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 3,969 Senior Member
    Done this post a hundred times or more.. KG Industries bore cleaning products. Maybe some Iosso bore paste, if you feel the need to, though it's not necessary. Wipe-Out is okay if you have the time. This is not an opinion. I own a Hawkeye borescope, and have done "before and afters" on a lot of barrels with a lot of different products, and any version of Hoppes makes for a great cologne, as does most others. KG products....Iosso borepaste, Wipe-Out. Everything else is...pretty much...nothing. Sorry for the strong opinion. Mike
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 444 Member
    Bu-bu-bu-bu-bu, oh forget it.🏃
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 30,074 Senior Member
    I had some foaming stuff a few years ago I used on some MILSURP bbls........it worked pretty good on copper fouling, but good ole elbow grease along with a good cleaner usually gets most guns clean for me. This time though I needed something extra for lead fouling and the BC lead removal cloth did the trick. Problem with it is don't use it on blued guns or it may remove the bluing. Of course if you just use it in the bbl and are very careful I guess it would be OK.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 444 Member
    Those cloths work good but turn your fingers black. I use turpentine to get the lead off my skin.
  • Uncle FesterUncle Fester Senior Member Posts: 923 Senior Member
    Those cloths work good but turn your fingers black. I use turpentine to get the lead off my skin.

    A few years ago, I started using Nitrile gloves to keep the chemicals and lead off my skin.
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,029 Senior Member
    edited April 11 #15
    I don't use Ballistol for any heavy cleaning and certainly not for copper fouling.  I use it for a quick general cleaning of guns that are not dirty enough to do a thorough cleaning but I know I won't shoot for a while so a quick clean and wipe down and back into the safe they go.  Does short work of range fouling and light leading on revolvers leaving bores nice and shinny on handguns and rifles.  In decades I've NEVER had a speck of rust on any of my guns even when I've lived in crazy humid places like Florida and now in NC.  Excellent on wood too and someone told me I should use it to condition the leather on my hunting boots but I've never tried it.
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,029 Senior Member
    Here's a list of "Uses" for Ballistol.  I am going to try it on my boots..

    https://ballistol.com/uses/
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 444 Member
    Those cloths work good but turn your fingers black. I use turpentine to get the lead off my skin.

    A few years ago, I started using Nitrile gloves to keep the chemicals and lead off my skin.
    Goof idea!
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 9,332 Senior Member
    I like it.  I read somewhere that it's mineral oil, but don't know for sure. I don't like the smell.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 3,969 Senior Member
    If it's gentle enough to clean your boots, among other uses, it's not going to do much to clean your rifle bore. Trust me on this one. I've spent many $$ on practically every rifle cleaning "wonder-drug" on the market, and I have the means to inspect the actual results. KG-1 Carbon Remover followed by Iosso Bore Paste is as good as it gets from what I can tell. When finished, punch the bore out with a light film of Kroil. Very light. Mike
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • Uncle FesterUncle Fester Senior Member Posts: 923 Senior Member
    If it's gentle enough to clean your boots, among other uses, it's not going to do much to clean your rifle bore. Trust me on this one. I've spent many $$ on practically every rifle cleaning "wonder-drug" on the market, and I have the means to inspect the actual results. KG-1 Carbon Remover followed by Iosso Bore Paste is as good as it gets from what I can tell. When finished, punch the bore out with a light film of Kroil. Very light. Mike
    It was my understanding that Iosso is a polish and thus slightly abrasive.  It definitely gets the crud out of a really dirty barrel.

    Although I use it on really dirty barrels, I have avoided using it as part of my normal cleaning process for two reasons:
    1) the abrasives in it, and 
    2) it is hard to get all of it out.  


  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 1,967 Senior Member
    So what's the general opinion on the best chemical to use on a rifle bore that is severely  leaded?  I have an 1890 Winchester .22 that was probably never cleaned.  I tried Hoppes and brass brush with added chore boy brass.  Helped some, but much more remains. Thanks.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 17,913 Senior Member

    For a one-time deleading, used a little fine valve grinding compound from your local auto parts store on a brass brush.  A 1-ounce tube would be a lifetime supply.  Then do a thorough cleaning with a nylon brush, CLP or something similar to get all the residue out.  Valve grinding compound is carborundum dust in a grease base, so you're basically using a whetstone on the inside of your barrel.  It's important to get it all out after the fact.

    Jerry


    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,685 Senior Member
    edited April 12 #23
    I use Ballistol only on my muzzle loader. It is mainly mineral oil and doesn't leave a residue in the bore from burning black powder substitutes. In fact, since I use Tripple 7 I can get away with just swabbing the bore between hunts or range trips.

    F
    Teach said:

    For a one-time deleading, used a little fine valve grinding compound from your local auto parts store on a brass brush.  A 1-ounce tube would be a lifetime supply.  Then do a thorough cleaning with a nylon brush, CLP or something similar to get all the residue out.  Valve grinding compound is carborundum dust in a grease base, so you're basically using a whetstone on the inside of your barrel.  It's important to get it all out after the fact.

    Jerry

    Teach said:

    For a one-time deleading, used a little fine valve grinding compound from your local auto parts store on a brass brush.  A 1-ounce tube would be a lifetime supply.  Then do a thorough cleaning with a nylon brush, CLP or something similar to get all the residue out.  Valve grinding compound is carborundum dust in a grease base, so you're basically using a whetstone on the inside of your barrel.  It's important to get it all out after the fact.

    Jerry bo

    I guess that Bore Paste they sell is very similar. Hell I'm scared to use that stuff. I bought some once and still have it but too chicken to use it. I'm afraid I wouldn't get it all out. Shooting a rifle with that residue would be akin to fire lapping.



    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,021 Senior Member
    edited April 12 #24
    Kroil/Montana Extreme mix or Gunslick foam and then CLP. Been that way for years.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 9,332 Senior Member
    So what's the general opinion on the best chemical to use on a rifle bore that is severely  leaded?  I have an 1890 Winchester .22 that was probably never cleaned.  I tried Hoppes and brass brush with added chore boy brass.  Helped some, but much more remains. Thanks.

    Are you sure it's lead and not rust?  If it's lead, a Lewis Lead Remover should get it out, but if it's rust, a sleeve is in order.  And an 1890 deserves a great bore.

    I bought a Meridan .22 pump from the early 1900s when bp was used and the bore was ruined.  Got it relined and it's fine..  A lot of Martini .22s were lined from the BSA factory for enhanced accuracy...I used to know  who did it but have forgotten.  I have one of those.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 444 Member
    No one on this entire thread uses urine. Including me.

    I guess we've all become spoiled premadonas.👀
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 1,967 Senior Member
    Gene L said:
    So what's the general opinion on the best chemical to use on a rifle bore that is severely  leaded?  I have an 1890 Winchester .22 that was probably never cleaned.  I tried Hoppes and brass brush with added chore boy brass.  Helped some, but much more remains. Thanks.

    Are you sure it's lead and not rust?  If it's lead, a Lewis Lead Remover should get it out, but if it's rust, a sleeve is in order.  And an 1890 deserves a great bore.

    I bought a Meridan .22 pump from the early 1900s when bp was used and the bore was ruined.  Got it relined and it's fine..  A lot of Martini .22s were lined from the BSA factory for enhanced accuracy...I used to know  who did it but have forgotten.  I have one of those.

    It's not rust Gene. The patches come out black. No evidence of rust anywhere on the rifle. I have it completely torn down for a good cleaning.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 30,074 Senior Member
    edited April 13 #28
    Some stuff is better than others on removing lead or copper fouling. I doubt there is any lead fouling in .223/5.56 rifles because they are almost always fired with jacketed bullets.......so copper and powder fouling.

    Especially if they are fired a whole lot and I imagine the higher velocities and calibers that are hard on bbls are a lot worse.

    I say use whatever works for you. Endless amount of choices available. What may or may not have worked for one may be the opposite for another shooter.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 3,969 Senior Member
    Uncle Fester, A few things I've learned. Carbon, copper, and lead are 3 different things. What works for one doesn't usually work the others. But, carbon is the "binder" that holds the whole cruddy mess together. Get rid of that first. KG-1 Carbon Remover does that very well. When your patches come out relatively clean, punch the bore with Iosso or KG "Bore Polish", both of which are 1200 grit. (You will not hurt a bore with 1200 grit, I promise. The burning, pressurized powder you send down it with each shot is far more damaging). When you're happy with the results, run a few Kroil-soaked patches down the bore to remove the goo, then finish with dry patches until everything feels slick as ice on glass. That's pretty much it. Mike
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 30,074 Senior Member
    Does Kroil or any product lessen the deposits in the bore as you shoot if you pre-treat it with it?
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 444 Member
    edited April 13 #31
    Big Chief said:
    Does Kroil or any product lessen the deposits in the bore as you shoot if you pre-treat it with it?
    If it does and you use Kroil that way, you'd better store it muzzle down. That stuff creeps so good it'll get through the roll seam at the bottom of the sheet tin can.
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