S&W 64 K or L frame

104RFAST104RFAST Senior MemberPosts: 1,172 Senior Member
I have been reading up on my model 64/.357. everything I read talks about the flat milled forcing cone being
a characteristic of all K frame 357's. Cracking has occurred at the 6 o'clock position of the forcing cone. MY
model 64 definitely does not have the flat bottom cone, it appears the same as L & N frame round cones.
Is it possible some model 64's are L frames. This gun belonged to my Father and was manufactured sometime
before 1966.

Comments

  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 12,551 Senior Member
    Model 64 is a K-frame. It's also a .38 special. The stainless, fixed sight K-frame .357 was the Model 65, which was introduced in 1974. L-frames were introduced in 1980 or thereabouts. Also, models 64s were introduced in 1970. The first regular production stainless steel revolver (which a model 64 is) was introduced in 1965.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,682 Senior Member
    104RFAST wrote: »
    I have been reading up on my model 64/.357. everything I read talks about the flat milled forcing cone being
    a characteristic of all K frame 357's. Cracking has occurred at the 6 o'clock position of the forcing cone. MY
    model 64 definitely does not have the flat bottom cone, it appears the same as L & N frame round cones.
    Is it possible some model 64's are L frames. This gun belonged to my Father and was manufactured sometime
    before 1966.
    No way it's a L frame. They didn't start making them until either the late 70s or early 80s. If it isn't a K frame it has to be an N frame if it's that old. However, If it's an N frame it's going to be pretty big.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 6,589 Senior Member
    64 is most definitely a K frame. It's the stainless equivalent of the model 10/M&P

    You sure it's not a 65 - that being the .357 variant?
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • 104RFAST104RFAST Senior Member Posts: 1,172 Senior Member
    Now that I look with a magnifying glass I can definitely see -1 right on the edge of the frame,possibly explaining why I have the
    round forcing cone. 64-1 thanks for the help !!
    Bigslug wrote: »
    64 is most definitely a K frame. It's the stainless equivalent of the model 10/M&P

    You sure it's not a 65 - that being the .357 variant?
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 12,551 Senior Member
    This page lists Smith and Wesson model variations and what the -numbers mean. The -1 means it went to a heavy barrel.

    A couple of things, though:
    The Model 64 is a .38 Special, not a .357 magnum. As Bigslug pointed out, that's the Model 65.
    The Model 64-1 was introduced in 1972. Not before 1966.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • 104RFAST104RFAST Senior Member Posts: 1,172 Senior Member
    Thanks, I may be a little off on the years, could have been early 70's My Father was a fireman and belonged to the same union as the police in Miami, its possible he got the gun through his police buddies in the union, in those days buying a gun wasn't the big deal it has become today . One thing for sure the gun will be passed on and stay in the family
    This page lists Smith and Wesson model variations and what the -numbers mean. The -1 means it went to a heavy barrel.

    A couple of things, though:
    The Model 64 is a .38 Special, not a .357 magnum. As Bigslug pointed out, that's the Model 65.
    The Model 64-1 was introduced in 1972. Not before 1966.

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file