Sub Compact 45 ACP

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  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Moderator Posts: 25,088 Senior Member
    horselips wrote: »
    Neither one. Big calibers in small guns are a bad mix. They all mean hellish recoil, painfully short practice sessions, and in a moment of truth, your second and third shots are too long in coming. A small gun properly chambered in a smaller caliber is much easier (faster!) to shoot effectively.
    :rotflmao: No...
    "Attack rapidly, ruthlessly, viciously, without rest, however tired and hungry you may be, the enemy will be more tired, more hungry. Keep punching." General George S. Patton
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 9,676 Senior Member
    horselips wrote: »
    Neither one. Big calibers in small guns are a bad mix. They all mean hellish recoil, painfully short practice sessions, and in a moment of truth, your second and third shots are too long in coming. A small gun properly chambered in a smaller caliber is much easier (faster!) to shoot effectively.

    Yeah, you are so much better off with four .22 rounds that you can hit a barrel with at 3 yards. :tooth:

    The XDs45 recoil is not 'crushing.' It's stout, but not so much that a serious shooter is going to dread practice. A proper grip tames it pretty well. Having said that, I do enjoy shooting my 9mm Shield since I fixed the horrible trigger, and I use it more for subcompact practice, because it's cheaper. My range trips are too infrequent, and I have to shoot quite a few rounds, just to get back to where I was on the previous range trip. But, once I get back in the groove, I don't mind putting 4-5 magazines through the XDs45.

    Transitioning back and forth between the 9mm and .45 ACP is not a traumatic experience. It's actually more fun than shooting a Ruger LCP in .380, in my opinion, because I can actually hit a small target beyond 5 yards.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 17,918 Senior Member
    Like I used to tell my ghetto rat students who bragged about "My Nine"- - - -"A 9MM is a toy for a boy who can't shoot a man's gun!" Then I'd drop an empty 9MM case into a .45 ACP empty and completely hide it. Some of them got the message.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • bobbyrlf3bobbyrlf3 Senior Member Posts: 2,411 Senior Member
    horselips wrote: »
    Neither one. Big calibers in small guns are a bad mix. They all mean hellish recoil, painfully short practice sessions, and in a moment of truth, your second and third shots are too long in coming. A small gun properly chambered in a smaller caliber is much easier (faster!) to shoot effectively.

    You're joking, right?

    This is from my last session with my XD Mod 2.0 3.3" in .45ACP. Five shots, left hand only @ 7yds.

    IMG_1003.jpg


    Same day, 10 shots, two-hand grip @ 7yds.

    IMG_1002.jpg

    Granted, these were done under range conditions, and I'm probably a novice at best, but your comment holds no merit against my experience.
    Knowledge is essential to living freely and fully; understanding gives knowledge purpose and strength; wisdom is combining the two and applying them appropriately in words and actions.
  • BAMAAKBAMAAK Senior Member Posts: 3,961 Senior Member
    horselips wrote: »
    Neither one. Big calibers in small guns are a bad mix. They all mean hellish recoil, painfully short practice sessions, and in a moment of truth, your second and third shots are too long in coming. A small gun properly chambered in a smaller caliber is much easier (faster!) to shoot effectively.

    This from a guy who thinks 5 shots at 5 yds in 5 seconds is a drill.
    "He only earns his freedom and his life Who takes them every day by storm."

    -- Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, German writer and politician
  • JeeperJeeper Senior Member Posts: 2,875 Senior Member
    horselips wrote: »
    Neither one. Big calibers in small guns are a bad mix. They all mean hellish recoil, painfully short practice sessions, and in a moment of truth, your second and third shots are too long in coming. A small gun properly chambered in a smaller caliber is much easier (faster!) to shoot effectively.

    Horsesheeite. Depends on the gun. My wife stole my Kimber Ultracarry (.45 acp), so I can't say I have one anymore, but I CAN say it shoots GREAT. Not only is the recoil not difficult, but follow-up shots are fast, easy, and accurate. Please note that my wife (all 120 lbs of her) LOVES this gun, and is absolutely deadly with it.

    Having said that, I can attest that full house .357 mag loads are no fun in most of the ultralight 5 shot revolvers weighing in at under 20 oz's.

    [IMG][/img]P1100134.jpg

    Same gun, slow fire @ 25 yds. OFFHAND. 2 & 3/8" 5 shot group with 230 gr Winchester White Box ammo.

    Luis
    Wielding the Hammer of Thor first requires you to lift and carry the Hammer of Thor. - Bigslug
  • beanfieldbeanfield Member Posts: 84 Member
    When shooting stout recoiling handguns at the range, I always wear a fingerless shock mitt to protect from carpal tunnel syndrome. It makes for a more pleasant trip. If I ever need to pull my little gun during times of peril, I'll endure the sting.


  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 30,169 Senior Member
    I've fired Teach's AMT Backup, it is a handful all right, but that is what it was made fer.............up close and personal like business encounters.

    Find a pistol you feel comfortable with and will have confidence in. Good advice to try before you buy if possible. Get one YOU can shoot/handle well, not me or anybody else on here....you being the one to carry it and trust your life with it.

    Don't make the mistake of trying to turn a sub-compact into a range/target gun, sure you can practice and should, but for extended range sessions you may wanna consider a full sized model.

    Laws of physics don't change, but some guns others say are the cat's meow may not be for you and vice versa.

    Good advice on here, as usual from a variety of perspectives. Make up your own mind, some very good starting points mentioned to narrow down what you may take into consideration.

    As they say, a hit with a .22 is better than a miss with a .45. That doesn't mean you should start with a .22 for SD (still better than your fists), but just be able to shoot what you carry and hit what you are aiming at at SD distances.

    We all have different requirements, budgets and levels of devotion we are willing to make for our SD/HD needs. Some will take it to the Nth degree and some will fulfill the basic requirements of getting a CCW Lic# and not much more.

    There are no magic bullets or guns to fire them from.

    Good luck in your quest and selection.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 9,676 Senior Member
    Hell, just learn to shoot, and then buy whatever you like.

    Stop trying to compensate for lack of skill or training, by buying some wonder-invention that still requires you to put the bullet onto the target.
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