Found an old soldier's grave

1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior MemberPosts: 1,548 Senior Member
We take care of a local cemetery, and while figuring out a plot for a recently passed neighbor, I came upon this:133fbcb466862f1a7c743924c8300359.jpg1dc35a109fc7a6ff72cdb40d48e141f8.jpg56326dc9f5081bc35e46f225c3dbabbb.jpg if I read the headstone correctly, he died in 1887. With a picture of his view in the spring time.


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Replies

  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 5,145 Senior Member
    Very cool!
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 15,674 Senior Member
    Do you know anything about the "Veteran's Star"? That's pretty cool.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    Carry a 25 if it makes you feel good, but do not ever load it. If you load it, you may shoot it. If you shoot it, you may hit somebody, and if you hit somebody – and he finds out about it – he may be very angry with you. --Jeff Cooper
  • TrueTone911TrueTone911 Senior Member Posts: 5,720 Senior Member
    That's cool!!
    I refuse to join any club that would have me as a member.
    Groucho Marx
  • sherwoodsherwood Senior Member Posts: 1,213 Senior Member
    The Boss and I have walked thru cemeteries all over the eastern half of the country except for Alabama and Mississippi. We have seen many stars/markers from both sides. There are also stars from both world wars and Korea. We don't remember seeing anything from the war in Viet Nam.
    I may be old but I ain't dead!
    DPRMD
  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Posts: 1,548 Senior Member
    zorba wrote: »
    Do you know anything about the "Veteran's Star"? That's pretty cool.


    I don't know a lot, I think a veteran organization made them. There are others that say GAR or CSA ,this particular grave I will have to make a rubbing to decipher it all. He had two of his children on the sides of the marker, one of which only lived to be 15.


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  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    He survived the war and lived well beyond it. Be great to know more.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • olesniperolesniper Senior Member Posts: 3,502 Senior Member
    Looks like a Grand Army of the Republic marker. Name???
    Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
    I will fear no evil: For I carry a .308 and not a .270
  • olesniperolesniper Senior Member Posts: 3,502 Senior Member
    marker_zpslfst3lye.jpg
    Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
    I will fear no evil: For I carry a .308 and not a .270
  • 6EQUJ5 - WOW!6EQUJ5 - WOW! Banned Posts: 482 Member
    Very cool. When I was stationed at Ft Bragg, N.C. there were a couple of Civil War graves near the old rappelling towers off of Yadkin Rd and Gruber. If I remember correctly, both were "Unknown's." The headstones were similar to the ones in your photograph. The graves were always maintained by off duty paratroopers so I would imagine they're still there.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 15,674 Senior Member
    olesniper wrote: »
    marker_zpslfst3lye.jpg

    Thanx O.S.! So this was a generic marker designed to cover all branches - I was kinda confused by the bugle...
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    Carry a 25 if it makes you feel good, but do not ever load it. If you load it, you may shoot it. If you shoot it, you may hit somebody, and if you hit somebody – and he finds out about it – he may be very angry with you. --Jeff Cooper
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 13,637 Senior Member
    Lots of interesting old cemeteries with interesting occupants in that part of the country...

    We found a small burial site (couldn't really call it a "cemetery") on private property in McPherson County Ks that had headstones for a number of 10th Cavalry Troopers -"Buffalo Soldiers" They had all died on the same day in the 1870s...one can only assume in some type of action. The temporary markers had been replaced with proper headstones....

    There is another cemetery about three miles east of Canton KS.that contain the graves of folks who died on the Santa Fe trail as well as the grave of a teenage boy who was killed by the Cheyene in a running fight...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 1,979 Senior Member
    Rumor has it that Don Imus was a Marine Corps. bugler.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 20,835 Senior Member
    There's an old church, the building is probably no bigger than 30'x20' with a grave yard out to the side, about two miles south of Atlanta Texas called Law's Chapel. It is the oldest operational Protestant church in Texas, established in 1830. That grave yard has a hell of a lot of history in it. Many were veterans of the Civil War. All the veterans entered there were Confederate soldiers. Some of them are ancestors of mine. The Law family is in my family tree along with the Whites and Maxwell's. They were all my dad's mother's family, all true son's of the South.

    There was one story my dad used to tell that was relayed to him by one relative who was the son of one of the veterans. He said his (my dad's) uncle, Green White (Seriously that was actually his name), was in the Confederate Cavalry. I don't know who's cavalry, maybe Forest's, but I think it was probably somebody like John B. Hood.

    Whatever, they were in Virginia and they knew Lee was going to surrender to Grant at any minute. They said, Ol' Green was a mean SOB and he told his cousin John Watkins that he was going "to ride down and kill him one more damn Yankee before this thing's over." Then he road off down the hill. Watkins said in a few minutes he heard some gun fire and rode down the hill to find Green dead on the ground surrounded by 3 dead Yankees.

    That's what I call letting things get out of perspective. Here you are just minutes away from peace after 4 years of one of the bloodiest conflicts in history, you know damn well at that stage your side doesn't have a prayer of winning and rather than go home to family and friends, you choose to commit suicide.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Posts: 1,548 Senior Member
    A little drive north there's a small cemetery with all soldiers , you either have to walk or ride a horse as it is in the middle of a big private pasture on top of a hill. I don't remember their unit on the grave markers, I will have to make another trip up there and take some pictures.


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  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 13,637 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    The Law family is in my family tree along with the Whites

    Holy crap! We could be related! My uncle is a White...along with a bunch of cousins,....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Jay, IF your roots are Southern, and go back to the mid-late 1700's, the probability is pretty high that you are related to many whose roots are identical. Remember, it wasn't 'till about the late 1890's-early 1900's that immigration into our Country got off to a big start, primarily with Italian immigrants into New York. The Irish to a smaller degree earlier during the Potato Famine, yes, but most of these had relatives already here who helped them settle in.

    Gene and I are from the very same small geographic area of the Country. My Grandmother's family was born, bred and originally settled just one county east of where Gene is from. I guarantee you that if the two of us sat down and started comparing family notes/histories, it wouldn't be too long before we found that we both had the same great-great uncle or some such event!

    In years gone by, managing land, timber and wildlife in the Deep Rural South, I've seen a few--not many, but a few--graves of Confederate veterans. I am aware of one small-town cemetery where two graves, side by side, are brothers. One served the Confederacy, the other the Union.

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