First Time After Wyoming Merriam's

Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior MemberPosts: 6,705 Senior Member

Since we have been in Wyoming, I had not hunted turkey.  I knew we had Merriam turkey in the area, but when we lived in Kansas, the turkeys were everywhere, and I just did not see the challenge of hunting one.  This year, with encouragement from Chris, I applied for a turkey tag.  I kind of expected it to be relatively easy to fill this tag.  We can use both the 22 Magnum and or centerfire here to hunt turkey, so I decided on an Anschutz 22 Mag for close and personal and the H-S Precision HSP 6XC for wide open areas.  I ended up carrying each specialty pistol an equal period of time, even though it wasn’t planned that way.  The terrain/amount of cover was the deciding factor each time.  Chris carried his 284 Winchester center-grip XP-100 and an S&W 357 Magnum iron sighted revolver.  My other hunting buddy, Tracey carried a Mossberg 12 gauge.  When I was with Tracey, I carried the 22 Magnum and when I was Chris, I carried the 6XC HSP.  I hunted a total of four days, walking from 7-10 miles each day in the Black Hills, up and down some fairly steep terrain at times.  It was harder hunting for turkey than for my last couple of mule deer and antelope.  I hunted two days with Chris and two days with Tracey.  On the first two days of hunting we never saw a turkey on public land (We never hunted on private land).  On the second day with Tracey, we heard a tom gobble a couple of times, but never saw him.  The weather has been weird here this year too, with quite a bit of snow and cooler weather than normal.  This past Saturday, I hunted with Chris again, which was my fourth day to hunt.  All four times when we went out, we went to different places each time.  I have learned more about hunting on public land around the Newcastle and Sundance areas.  This past Saturday, the weather was forecast to be in the upper 70’s with wind.  The morning hunt, was again a lot of walking, but we did see one young jake.  It was nice to know, there was actually turkeys on public land.  We took a lunch break and headed out again to the same area we had covered in the morning.  As was typical, we saw turkey on private land, but nothing on public. During the afternoon, we heard a gobble, which ended up ensuing in a wild goose/turkey chase up a ridge, but again we never once laid eyes on them.  While heading to another piece of public land we spied two toms by themselves, heading toward public land.  We were able to get ahead of them and set up an ambush.

We were set up on rocks higher up the ridge that wasn’t the best rest, but it worked.  Chris was to my right, and the turkeys should come out to our right on the bottom we assumed.

The first tom (my turkey) came out low, on the bottom of the ridge. My turkey (Compared to the one Chris was going for), was further down below us almost directly in front of me, but behind a tree (79 yards).  I had to move to my left to get a clear shot on mine, and when I did, it was about at that time that the second turkey came out higher on the ridge and was to our right and closer, around the 50 to 55 yard range. The second turkey or Chris’s turkey, saw me moving to get in a shooting position and was alerted (Neck strung out high, looking at us). I still could not shoot, as my turkey was behind the tree.  He had no idea we were there. Thankfully, Chris’ tom was not spooked enough and finally mine cleared the tree, then, I had a limb directly in line with my bore.  Finally, he moved left far enough and we were able to make a synchronized shot. 

If you have ever tried to do synchronized shooting, you realize it is not as easy as it looks. 

The synchronized shot under pressure or shooting on demand is what made everything so sweet. 

Shot placement was such, that we lost very little meat.   What a sweet way to end the day.

[img]https://i.imgur.com/xein3DNl.jpg[/img]

https://i.imgur.com/xein3DNl.jpg

[img]https://i.imgur.com/kPhZmhnl.jpg[/img]

https://imgur.com/kPhZmhn












Ernie

"The Un-Tactical"

Replies

  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,705 Senior Member
    I keep doing something wrong with the pics...Sorry!
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • shushshush Senior Member Posts: 6,165 Senior Member



    cjp wrote: »..... Oh dear God, I've admitted to liking something Limey.I'll never hear the end of this.

    Jayhawker wrote: »...But seriously Shush....

    Big Chief wrote: ».........walking around with a greasy butt ain't no fun, though!

     


     

  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 9,766 Senior Member
    Good job! Where do you aim at a turkey, with a rifle? I've killed a couple with a 12 gauge and Number 1 buck shot, but I have never succeeded in hitting one in the head, with a rifle. Base of the neck would be my second choice, but I've never asked anyone that knows, because everyone I know shoots them with shotguns.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 19,068 Senior Member
    Nicely done. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 7,464 Senior Member
    It must be super difficult in the big wide open spaces you hunt.  Congratulations!
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 656 Senior Member
    edited April 30 #7
    Sure looks nice up there.
    Maybe abnormally dry for spring?
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 6,752 Senior Member
    Extremely nice job.  That western public land is huge and intimidating.  Just finding birds is a challenge, let alone sealing the deal.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 6,752 Senior Member
    I keep doing something wrong with the pics...Sorry!

    Ernie the [img] tag is dead/no longer required with the new forum.  The way to add pics is to use the picture button on the post toolbar and just paste the link into the URL box that appears.  It will load right into the post.    

    If doing so from your phone, press the "GO" button to complete the linking, and the pic will appear automatically.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,705 Senior Member
    Sure looks nice up there.
    Maybe abnormally dry for spring?
    Actually wet.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,705 Senior Member
    bisley said:
    Good job! Where do you aim at a turkey, with a rifle? I've killed a couple with a 12 gauge and Number 1 buck shot, but I have never succeeded in hitting one in the head, with a rifle. Base of the neck would be my second choice, but I've never asked anyone that knows, because everyone I know shoots them with shotguns.
    Depends on the direction of the bird.  I was hoping for a face on shot.  That didn't happen.  Had a broad side shot so I shot just above center which caused me to miss the breast meat...I did clip the top of one side.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,705 Senior Member
    Six-Gun said:
    Extremely nice job.  That western public land is huge and intimidating.  Just finding birds is a challenge, let alone sealing the deal.
    It was harder than I expected.  But I had a great time, even though it was frustrating at times.  I had to work for it-That was the good part.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,705 Senior Member
    Diver43 said:
    It must be super difficult in the big wide open spaces you hunt.  Congratulations!
    I like the open spaces actually.  Dark timber is my least favorite way of hunting in Wyoming...But I will do it in a heartbeat, if that is what it takes.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 6,752 Senior Member
    edited May 2 #14
    Six-Gun said:
    Extremely nice job.  That western public land is huge and intimidating.  Just finding birds is a challenge, let alone sealing the deal.
    It was harder than I expected.  But I had a great time, even though it was frustrating at times.  I had to work for it-That was the good part.

    Yeah, they are a pain out West.  I used to see birds in Utah walk right through my campsite while me and friends were eating one day, and the next day you wouldn't see a single bird.  The Montana bird I got this year on private was even tough.  I know generally where these birds are in the Fall because they concentrate near the ranch seeking silage from the cattle operations.  In the Spring? Forget it.  As soon as their caloric needs drop and the grass greens up, they spread right out and it hunts like public land.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,705 Senior Member
    On the way home, I dropped of a gift for a baby shower that I did not attend.
    In the process of being at her in-law's house, it came about that we (husband and father-in-law are big time hunters) started talking about hunting.  They have a farm, and don't really hunt turkey, and told me they were covered up in them....I guess I have a place on private land now to hunt turkey.  Probably use my revolver or the 22 Magnum next year.  Sometimes, when you are not even looking a for a place to hunt, one falls into your lap.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member Posts: 1,209 Senior Member
    Good hustle! Luv me a Black Hills turkey hunt 
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain

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