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What do YOU feel is the most important aspect of CCW

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  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,928 Senior Member
    temmi wrote: »
    I view the will and the skills together.


    If you have the skills you have the will....

    Another nope...I know plenty of good shooters who (admitted by themselves) while hell on targets would have problems if suddenly thrust into a self-defense situation.
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    True, I have met plenty of those, kept all firearms and ammo separate and locked up.
    I could never understand that mindset.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • N320AWN320AW Senior Member Posts: 648 Senior Member
    I voted for the will to use it, but going a bit deeper . . . the surprise factor is the most important to my way of thinking!
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    True, that last thing that should pass through the perps mind, before the bullet should be:

    "I sure did not see that coming, who woulda thunk that fat guy would be armed ?"
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • bruchibruchi Senior Member Posts: 2,581 Senior Member
    No question that "the will to use deadly force" is number one but you need to add to it the gumption not to flinch and the skills to get the job done, this is one situation where you do not want to leave the end to be determined by luck.
    If this post is non welcomed, I can always give you a recipe for making "tostones".
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    How hard is it to get a permit to carry in P.R. nowadays ?
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • bruchibruchi Senior Member Posts: 2,581 Senior Member
    DoctorWho wrote: »
    How hard is it to get a permit to carry in P.R. nowadays ?

    To start it will set you back around $1000, attorney fees and stamps, you must already have a gun permit, that is around $300 and some paperwork, you can save a few hundreds if you go solo on either permit but 99.9% of folks hire an attorney for the CCW, you have to get a bunch of paperwork, most of it the same you got for your permit already, go to court, bring 2 folks as personal references and ask a judge for the permit, well your lawyer will, in most instances if you do the whole dance you will get it, it is good for 5 years, can only carry one handgun, absolutely no long arms, you can't even have a loaded mag for a rifle anywhere outside a range.
    If this post is non welcomed, I can always give you a recipe for making "tostones".
  • jguilletjrjguilletjr New Member Posts: 6 New Member
    I think there are 3 important factors. The Most important being "Mind Set" Deciding before hand that you will take action, with out hesitation. The second being regular practice so that the action becomes second nature. This also goes along with prificiency with your weapon of choice. The third is Having your weapon with you at all times. First rule of gunfighting is "bring a gun" The pocket pistol that you have is better than the .44 Mag you left in the car, or at home.

    I believe all three principals are equally important.

    JSG
  • avmechavmech Senior Member Posts: 856 Senior Member
    You can have the best defense weapon available and have taken all the training available, if you do not have the will to use them, they are completely worthless
    NRA Benefactor Member
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    " in most instances if you do the whole dance you will get it, it is good for 5 years, can only carry one handgun, "

    That is pretty good, but why no long arms outside a range ???
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    I occasionally get chastised or lectured to on this subject by folks who think I'm naive or ill-informed on the subject. Some of the criticisms are well founded, for sure, but the bottom line is that a person has to adapt some plan that he or she can live with and feel confident of executing, when their worst fears become reality. I agree that if a person can motivate himself to 'overtrain' for something that probably won't happen, he is better off if something does happen, but we are all different, and some simply won't do it, without a wake-up call.

    I came very slowly to the idea of carrying a lethal weapon, 24-7, and never progressed to the level of taking training from an expert. For me to get into it that deeply, I would have to be motivated by a higher threat level than I presently perceive. It is true that by the time I realize that that higher threat level exists, I may be right in the middle of some situation I don't know how to handle, but that is simply the way it is, and it seems that no amount or forewarning can make me adopt the necessary mindset. I always have a gun that I know how to handle safely and shoot with a reasonable degree of accuracy. I will likely not walk away from an encounter with a seasoned bad guy who has a plan and is hard core enough to take lives in the execution of it, unless I can keep my wits about me enough to surprise him, and get very lucky.

    But I do have a chance against an idiot, and that is better than nothing.
  • DCortezDCortez Member Posts: 58 Member
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    For some of us that level of overtraining is just fun.

    I agree whole-heartedly with this statement and most of the rest of your excellent post. If I could justify discarding some other less fun things I have to do, I would definitely practice much, much more than I do.

    The only reason I keep posting these type of comments is that I think many more of us than would care to admit it do not practice well enough or often enough, simply because of the environment we live in. The very people we want to protect do not understand the logistics and mindset required to CCW in a safe and practical way.

    I mostly do the best I can, anyway, and let those who do actually know that I carry think whatever they want. But, everyone grows weary of swimming upstream, occasionally. I try to compensate with dry-fire practice, and by working scenarios in my mind, but the advantages gained from that are far inferior to live-fire practice.

    Situational awareness is my best defense. I have always done it, way before deciding to carry a handgun, or even having heard the term used. It gives me the time to make decisions, and the decision as to whether or not the situation merits the use of lethal force is a weighty one. I fully intend to recognize trouble early, and avoid it, but if not, there is still a last ditch option, and having that option makes all the hassles of carrying concealed worthwhile.
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