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How do you guys just go out and shoot deer? Buffy's question as a topic

JayhawkerJayhawker ModeratorManistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,287 Senior Member
Funny how it differs from place to place....Back in MI deer hunting was an event. I shot a considerable number of deer in Mi but I also spent a considerable amount of time hunting as well...typically taking most of the month of November off work to do so... Here, frankly I'm beginning to find deer hunting kinda boring...if I need to fill the freezer, I can fill it, One season I filled five tags in 5 days of hunting...well, not really, it was more like a few hours of hunting - the garage looked like a deer morgue. Another year my cousin and I killed 7 in a six day season. Last year I needed to fill two tags, I had watched a bunch of deer for a few evenings and knew what time they would come out into the wheat. Set up about 3:30 p.m - deer came out, two shots, both tags filled. At this point in my life I have much more fun taking someone who has never taken a deer. But it's still not a huge event - no need to get up at daybreak just get out of bed, have a cup of coffee, eat a nice breakfast head out and by sundown, I can pretty much guarantee we'll have a deer down.

Hunting horns on the other hand, is a completely different proposition...an exercise in frustration watching decent bucks walk by until a big one shows up...and there's the distinct possibility that the big one won't show up....so i see a LOT more deer than I kill.

Actually, I find hunting coyotes WAY more fun than hunting deer...
Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
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Replies

  • timctimc Senior Member TexasPosts: 6,684 Senior Member
    I am that way with pigs. I love shooting pigs way more than deer, pigs are smart, learn faster and can be much tougher to hunt when they have been under hunting pressure for a while. Seems like every time I go out hunting I get 2-3 pigs over a weekend but by the end of hunting season after 3 months of hunting pressure they get difficult to find.
    timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
    AKA: Former Founding Member
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    Heres the thing.

    Its thick where I live. No, you don't know anything about thick. Your thick would be the wide open freaking savannah to me.

    Also, I think I am guilty of doing something that one of you guys alluded to. Someone here said, they spent years hoping the deer would come to them but finally learned to go to the deer.

    I hunt tracks and rubs and scrapes. I have never seen doo-doo in my usual haunts. The deer move through, but I cannot find bedding areas.

    One downside is I'm hunting about 130 acres. I have contemplated joining a hunting club but 1,000 - 1,500 a year makes for expensive meat. But I may have no choice.
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member God's countryPosts: 4,646 Senior Member
    I hunt public land. So starting from scratch I looked for areas that just looked deery to me. Then I scouted out specific trails looking for recent sign and preferred food sources. Also I looked for terrain features that might funnel deer movement. Plus I mostly still hunt so every hunt is more scouting.
    Not counting deer crossing the road but strictly what I saw while hunting, I saw 3 does, any of which i could have easily taken. And four bucks. One of those I saw several times. i killed one buck out of a herd of 3 he was hanging out with.
    I've seen more does while bowhunting since then but always way out of range. Bow season lasts through February though and I would like to take one more.
    Maybe I shouldn't have replied to the the thread since I don't feel I "just" went out and killed a deer. I feel like i worked my hiney off for that one shot. Sure was fun though.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,698 Senior Member
    Easy. I hike my knees into inflamed ibuprofen deposits in deer habitat for three years, studying non-legal does and spikes, then shoot the first barely legal fork I see. Nothing to it.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member God's countryPosts: 4,646 Senior Member
    Bigslug wrote: »
    Easy. I hike my knees into inflamed ibuprofen deposits in deer habitat for three years, studying non-legal does and spikes, then shoot the first barely legal fork I see. Nothing to it.

    lol, took me longer than 3 years to get my first one years ago.

    Buffco, I would kill to have access to that much private land. You could do what Wambli suggested or you could find a good spot for a timed feeder and just clear some shooting lanes. Home made salt licks have worked well for me too. But usually only in early bow season. They abandon them after that around here.
    Surround the feeder with stands so you always have downwind options.
    Sneak in and out.
    Noise discipline is paramount.
    Sit the stand all day.
    Walk the perimeter of the property, it's important to know what's going on across the fence.
    If you do find a bedding area, never go there again and leave them unmolested.
    These are some tactics that worked for me when i had access to a coupla farms.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Dellrose TNPosts: 18,428 Senior Member
    On my little 100-acre piece of Tennessee, I've got everything from wide-open spaces for 300+ yard shots to honeysuckle and blackberry thickets so matted I couldn't see a deer feeding 10 yards away. I could see the bushes shake, but there was no way to get a clear shot. I've been watching the same travel trails and feeding and bedding areas for the past thirty years. On any particular day, I can probably guess within 1,000 yards of where the majority of the deer population in the neighborhood will be. That distance covers my own place, and about three of my neighbors' farms, including the neighborhood bunny hugger who keeps a corn feeder running year round. The hunters in the area appreciate his efforts at keeping our freezer stock nice and healthy!

    With a 3-doe-a-day limit over close to a 3-month season, there's virtually no way to take more venison than the law allows. Yes, there's a 3-buck limit for the season, but us meat hunters figured out a long time ago that horn soup doesn't taste very good. If a nice-looking trophy buck strolls by, I might bushwhack him, but then I've got all the trouble and expense of getting a mount done, and then I've got to figure out where to hang the thing! I missed the biggest buck I've ever seen on the place- - - - -I touched the set trigger on my flintlock with a gloved finger before I had the sights aligned! The shot missed by a couple of feet!
    Jerry
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,287 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    But I may have no choice.

    Sure you do...buy a nonresident license and a doe tag(s)for $140.00...drive out and we'll send you home with a freezer full of venison....Helluva lot cheaper than $1500.00 a year...even if you figure the gas it takes to drive...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Dellrose TNPosts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Tennessee is a lot closer, and the license fees are about the same!
    Jerry
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,287 Senior Member
    See? You got places to hunt....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Dellrose TNPosts: 18,428 Senior Member
    The hunting must be good- - - -I've got a visitor coming from England next season to chase some deer!
    Jerry
  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Olsburg KansasPosts: 1,650 Senior Member
    Wiley is more of a challenge to hunt than just shooting deer with firearms, but that is what makes it so interesting for me. Also gives you something to chase in the winter...
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    My name isn't Danial Boone, but Those thick areas you talk about are where Bucky beds down. If you dare stumble into his bedroom you can see where he's been sleeping. But I have yet to scare one up out of there. The Bucks of Techomonty or the Bucks of South Texas can hear you coming a mile off. Some people have success at that. I sit at the opening to these hollows and burrows. You can catch him coming to breakfast if you're real quiet.

    One thing that has helped me kill a few skiddish bucks is dressing like a bow hunter, descenting your clothes and your body. Paint your face with camo make up, wear camo or something to break up your lines. Deer see movement. They are pretty color blind but now they're finding that they can see some colors, such as blues. Actually, deer are said to be color blind to hunter orange. I usually wear at least a hunter orange hat when I'm hunting on public land or where there are other people I don't know hunting to keep from getting shot. I like the Hunter Orange Camo.

    But go to a bow hunting supply store and get some detergent to wash your clothes with and descenting spray. I use Ivory soap to bathe with. It is said to be relatively scentless. However they do make special soaps that won't make you smell like a French Maid. I have had deer walk within 3 feet of me when I do all this.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    Where I hunt now is a rat maze of live oaks and rose hedge. It's full of snakes and chiggers. I don't know how a deer can get in there. But if you shoot a deer or a hog and he gets into that mess, you are going to be very lucky to find him. And trying to walk around in that rose hedge is a pain. Those runners will trip you. I tripped on one today and landed right beside a big bad thorn bush that would have certainly impaled me. And that was right next to my blind. I wasn't into the rough stuff yet.

    Anyway, deer see movement. If you move slowly he may not see you. One thing though, doe are much easier to get a shot at. Bucks around here make themselves scarce this time of year. Today was the last day of our 2012-2013 season. I saw 6 doe and NO Bucks. Bucks will stay in that thick brush until dark. Usually, I see some bucks early before it gets really light in the morning and then right as it's getting dark in the evening. However where I'm hunting now, I have yet to see a deer at dark except one day when I was leaving driving out of the lease. These deer have it made and when there's a good acorn crop like this year they are very scarce. I saw most of the bucks I saw during rut when their minds were preoccupied with "OTHER" things.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 28,069 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    Heres the thing.

    Its thick where I live. No, you don't know anything about thick. Your thick would be the wide open freaking savannah to me.

    Also, I think I am guilty of doing something that one of you guys alluded to. Someone here said, they spent years hoping the deer would come to them but finally learned to go to the deer.

    I hunt tracks and rubs and scrapes. I have never seen doo-doo in my usual haunts. The deer move through, but I cannot find bedding areas.

    One downside is I'm hunting about 130 acres. I have contemplated joining a hunting club but 1,000 - 1,500 a year makes for expensive meat. But I may have no choice.

    First, you have to have deer density. If they aren't there, you aren't going to find them.

    1 deer per 5 acres is a lot harder to hunt than 5 deer per 1 acre.

    After that, it's knowing where to look. Then, it's about technique.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Western PAPosts: 8,234 Senior Member
    First, you sir have never seen NEPA mountain laurel. It isnt thick, its solid. If you can get up while crawling through it, you will NOT fall over.

    You are on a pass through area, so am I. You won't hold deer on 130 ac, and I won't hold them on 52. Your mission is to pattern them. If it is thick you are just pushing them away from you while they are passing through.

    If you have access to equipment, plant a food plot or 2. You will not hold the deer, but you will give them a place to slow down and snack and the idea that its a safe place. Any trees you drop, stack them into a criss cross pattern with lots of room between. Thats bedding area, and they will eat the leaves.

    Game camera. You need to know when they are where. Put a little food out in the off season and set a camera up. Game cams are fun anyway.

    Buy 3 tree stands, ladder stands get up over the weeds. They should be on sale soon. I like buddy stands because there is room for 2 OR room for a pack with coffee, snacks and whatever else I want. Put them up in the off season and get in them and just watch. I moved the one that is the most productive I have around for 3 years until it found a home.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    :tooth:
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Funny how it differs from place to place....Back in MI deer hunting was an event. I shot a considerable number of deer in Mi but I also spent a considerable amount of time hunting as well...typically taking most of the month of November off work to do so... Here, frankly I'm beginning to find deer hunting kinda boring...if I need to fill the freezer, I can fill it, One season I filled five tags in 5 days of hunting...well, not really, it was more like a few hours of hunting - the garage looked like a deer morgue. Another year my cousin and I killed 7 in a six day season. Last year I needed to fill two tags, I had watched a bunch of deer for a few evenings and knew what time they would come out into the wheat. Set up about 3:30 p.m - deer came out, two shots, both tags filled. At this point in my life I have much more fun taking someone who has never taken a deer. But it's still not a huge event - no need to get up at daybreak just get out of bed, have a cup of coffee, eat a nice breakfast head out and by sundown, I can pretty much guarantee we'll have a deer down.


    Hunting horns on the other hand, is a completely different proposition...an exercise in frustration watching decent bucks walk by until a big one shows up...and there's the distinct possibility that the big one won't show up....so i see a LOT more deer than I kill.

    Actually, I find hunting coyotes WAY more fun than hunting deer...

    Ahh there you go, I bet you bought a brand new .270 to hunt those yotes with, since it's a "Damned Adequate Coyote Rifle",
    :tooth:
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    Seriously, we have coyotes out the gazuuu! Now that deer season is over, it's hogs and yotes on the bill. But the yotes won't be taken with the .270. I want to relegate that to my trusty 22-250. Actually, I really want to shoot the barrel out of it so I can have a new Shilen screwed on with a 1-9 twist. It currently has the old Remington 1-14 twist rate. That sucks. I want something to shoot 70-75 grain bullets. So, I'm going to start using it on yotes and stuff.

    Actually, I shoot Speer 70 grain semi spitzers out of it and they stabilize fine. But I would like to shoot some more Ballistically friendly bullets.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • RiflemannRiflemann Member WC MinnesotaPosts: 269 Member
    I hate to say this with some guys only hunting small areas for deer. We have over 4000+ acres of river bottom farm land in the family to hunt on. We setup 8 trail cameras starting July 1 and move them every 2 weeks to several different areas in both Minnesota and North Dakota. We hunt both sides of the river that seperates the 2 states with 10 deer stands and 2 ground blinds. The 4 of us who hunt in the family fill all of our tags every year. Yes it is still exciting to us every season. I did hunt public land for the first 30 years of my hunting life and it did stink to get skunked several years in a row. We hunt coyotes all year, and this is what we really live for, they are alot harder to hunt than deer that we track with trail cameras for 4 months. Hate to run but the night is clear and the night hunting for coyotes has been very good the last 2 weeks so duty calls, later..........P.S. The AR is one nice yote rifle.
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    I gotta say, y'all are darn lucky to be able to hunt deer. I can't even get a tag, and MHS has probably got at least 5-7 preference points built up by now. We are limited to one a year. What stinks is.....I was at the Library in Evergreen CO the other day, and there was at least 10 does in the parking lot...twice the size of your Whitetails. A couple weeks prior, there was a beautiful 10 point Buck walking across the highway.
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member A true 'Southerner'. NZPosts: 8,403 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    Heres the thing.

    Its thick where I live. No, you don't know anything about thick. Your thick would be the wide open freaking savannah to me.

    Also, I think I am guilty of doing something that one of you guys alluded to. Someone here said, they spent years hoping the deer would come to them but finally learned to go to the deer.

    I hunt tracks and rubs and scrapes. I have never seen doo-doo in my usual haunts. The deer move through, but I cannot find bedding areas.

    One downside is I'm hunting about 130 acres. I have contemplated joining a hunting club but 1,000 - 1,500 a year makes for expensive meat. But I may have no choice.

    Here are some of the things I have learned about hunting in thick bush Buffy..... and I mean really thick stuff where sometimes you have to crawl......

    During the off season, go for a walk through your hunting spot with a pair of secaturs and a hand saw. Trim holes in the undergrowth in places that will give you visibility of likely spots. At the same time, trim small branches that overhang the tracks that the deer use so that when you go back during the hunting season, you can walk them without the branches rubbing on your clothing. Dont wear clothing that will 'rasp' when branches rub against it. Wear materials like polarfleece as an outer garment. I have even gone to the extent of carrying a rake with me to rake some deer trails clear of small twigs and dead leaves so that I can be more stealthy.

    Deer will make some noise when walking in these areas. When you stalk animals in thick brush, provided you keep the noise down to a bare minimum, the chances are that the deer will think its one of their own. The secret to success in hunting thick bush is to move real slow and stop every pace or two and use your eyes properly. Dont look for a deer, cos you wont see one. What you will be looking for is the flicker of an ear, a small patch of brown/grey, ( depending on what colour the animals are in your neck of the woods), the gleam of perhaps an eye, the 'twitch' of some skin as the deer shakes a fly off. Dont expect to see a whole deer in that kind of cover. Every few paces, stop and crouch down and look for legs as often you have greater visibility at ground level. When you do crouch down, dont just glance but spend time looking, often you will see a deer leg only when it moves.

    If you hear any sound like a twig snap then stop. Dont move your head or body, but move your eyes only to look in the direction where the sound came from. If you can, slowly lower your body to your rifle rather than raise your rifle to your shoulder. This will lower your profile and may improve your visibility.....even if it doesnt improve your visibility, by lowering your profile you are lessening the risk of the deer paying you too much attention as it normally wont be threatened by something smaller and possibly less threatening than an upright object.

    Use your sense of smell. In thick brush provided you are hunting into the wind, you should be able to smell the deer out to about 30yds or greater. If you do smell one, freeze on the spot and look. Dont just glance but look closely at everything within range. If necessary, wait for up to 5-10 minutes and keep looking. When you move, do so with great care. Before putting your feet down, look to see what you are going to step on. If there are dry branches, move them quietly out of the way before placing your feet. If you move forward and the smell weakens, stop and look to your sides slowly. It means that you are walking past the animal. If a deer is not certain of what you are and hasnt had a good look at you, it will often wait to see what you are before taking flight.

    You may remember a couple of years ago I posted up about a deer cull I was doing in a native bush reserve. When hunting that area, visibility was down to about 8-10yds at the maximum and most places it was down to 4-5 yds. To hunt it effectively I was hunting at around 100yds an hour......that was about 1 pace per minute. The 2 deer I shot were at 10yds and 7-8 yds respectively from memory... It took me about 2 minutes to raise my rifle to my shoulder for the closest deer and close the bolt from half cock without making a sound......... then I had to wait 3-4 mins for the deer to move so I could get a shot. I was so close that I knew I wouldnt be able to see through the scope so had to look down the side of the T3 barrel to place the shot.

    One thing that is vital is to make sure the gear you are carrying doesnt make any sound. Sling swivels can squeak, knife handles can 'tap' your stock, loose rounds in your pocket can rattle, clips on your pack can rasp against branches. Make sure that there is nothing in your pockets, clipped to your belt, hanging off your pack that can make a foreign sound.

    Dont try to cover the whole area in one day. The biggest handicap is to move too quick. You will miss seeing deer if you move to fast but you can never go too slow. The slower you go the better your chances. If you are going for a days hunt, then make sure you use a pack with a camel back and drink through the tube. The sound of a clip or zip being opened will carry for a long way. If you carry snack bars, take them out of the foil wrapper before you start your hunt and wrap them in a piece of clean cloth. Dont carry food items that smell strongly.........leave the pickle and cheese sandwiches behind. Keep your hunting clothes away from scented things and dont wash them in normal laundry detergent. Use something like 'Sportwash' which is non scented and doesnt have any of the UV brighteners in it. Dont use any soap when you shower or toothpaste and shaving foam etc. They may attract the ladies but are a red flag to a deer within scent range.

    Weather can be your friend or worst enemy. Rain is good as it deadens sound and wind will make noise to cover any you make. Study the area you are going to hunt and plan your stalk to take advantage of the terrain and wind conditions. Dont walk along ridges, if you are following a ridge, walk just off the side of it and every 10-15 yds slowly walk towards the peak until you can see over it. Stop and look carefully before moving up to see further. Dont walk right up on to the peak, only go as far as necessary to see over it. After you have looked over the ridge, walk back down to where you were and move along further.

    If you are being really stealthy, always look behind you every now and then. Deer are curious and if you havent alarmed them they will often walk out behind you to see what you are. If you make a noise and hear an animal spook away from you, make a note of its direction and stop. Stay still for at least 10-15 minutes then head slowly in their direction and stop after every pace to look for it. Dont know what your deer habits are but if they are like ours, they will run a short distance normally then wait to see if they are being pursued . Give them time to settle down.

    Those are just some tips that will possibly help. Hunting in thick bush ( I mean really thick stuff) is a fantastic challenge and when you do have a successful hunt you will know that you took on a wild animal on its own terms and turf and beat it at its own game.

    There is no better feeling than that as a hunter.

    Hope some of this helps Bryant.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 28,069 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Oh boo freakin' hoo. You get to shoot elk.... Now hush up... :cuss:

    Bingo!
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member WyomingPosts: 8,566 Senior Member
    I have been in places where I have to work for deer and in places where it is pretty easy.
    Big difference between killing deer and hunting horns though.
    I am in a great area for hunting now-I'm spoiled and I know it.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    All 'yall better watch that Fella from NZ! I think he's a SNIPER :yikes:!
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
  • snake284-1snake284-1 Senior Member Posts: 2,500 Senior Member
    Alec is right about soaps and tooth paste, But deer can smell your body oder too. So use an unscented soap that you can buy at a bow hunting supply place and brush your teeth with baking soda. That's probably what your great grandparents brushed their teeth with anyway. If you go out there smelling like big foot, you're probably not going to see anything shootable.

    Also, Alec is an expert on all this so follow his lead to a tee and you'll be successful.

    One thing he left out though, because I don't think he has to deal with poisonous snakes. Get some good, quiet snake leggings. In that thick stuff is where Mr. Buzz Tail lives too. And be careful where you put your hands and even your face. You get bit on the neck by an Eastern Diamond Back and you may not have to worry about finding your way home.
    I'm Just a Radical Right Wing Nutt Job, Trying to Help Save My Country!
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Podunk, Tx.Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    Most of the deer I've killed in Colorado were taken as a secondary quarry while hunting elk. We have a combined elk/deer season, but it only lasts for 5-10 days. As a result, I find I usually have to pick a time that works best for one or the other. And, it's ard to get more than one tag for either species.

    We also are usually restricted to a specific area, so it's not like we can just go anywhere in the state. On the plus side, deer tags are relatively cheap, and there's a whole lot of public land available just about anywere you want to go.

    For the most part, it's 5-10 days of 'deer camp', which usually means sleeping in a tent during cold weather. With the right hunting companions, that can be very enjoyable and a lot of fun.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member A true 'Southerner'. NZPosts: 8,403 Senior Member
    Big difference between killing deer and hunting horns though.
    .

    Totally agree Ernie but the basics are the same. I dont hunt horns much cos they dont cook up very well and I prefer meat on the plate, not a head on the wall....:wink:.

    One thing I forgot to say is this. Be ready at all times to take a shot. When you do come across a deer, normally the opportunity to make it a successful hunt relies on you being ready all the time.
    Couple of years ago I was hunting a patch of really thick stuff with Bloodhound. The stuff we were in was thick bush with waist high flaxes and undergrowth. We must have been doing something right cos I went to step over a fallen tree and as I carefully put my foot down, I almost stepped on a 120lb boar that was asleep on the other side of it. Talk about a 'crap your pants' moment.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Olsburg KansasPosts: 1,650 Senior Member
    In KS with an any season tag, I "horn " hunt during the archery season and if unsuccessful, pick up the rifle for firearms season later in the year to fill tag(s). You get more time in the saddle that way, the wife says I do it to prolong hunting season. Funny I don't see it that way.:jester:
  • KSU FirefighterKSU Firefighter Senior Member Posts: 3,249 Senior Member
    1965Jeff wrote: »
    In KS with an any season tag, I "horn " hunt during the archery season and if unsuccessful, pick up the rifle for firearms season later in the year to fill tag(s). You get more time in the saddle that way, the wife says I do it to prolong hunting season. Funny I don't see it that way.:jester:

    This,:that:, is how I go out and shoot deer. I let my brother get all the scouting done in archery, then I show up for the rifle season. :tooth: Doesn't work as well here in Tennessee hunting public ground. Scouting, lots of scouting. Looking for places that look good for deer, while not over-crowded with other hunters. Finally narrowing down on some places. Could have taken a doe, or two, had that been legal where I was at. The best part is, I have spent more days in the woods this past year than any since I moved here. (Going to Ks this year!)
    The fire service needs a "culture of extinguishment not safety" Ray McCormack FDNY
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,602 Senior Member
    I hunt northern Californiastan for Blacktail deer. Jim Zumbo said they are the hardest deer to hunt and called them ghost deer. The average hunter gets one deer every nine years. There's a two buck per year limit, fork horns or better. They average about 100 to 150 pounds on the hoof and we're not permitted to shoot doe. In the 18 years I've been hunting here I came up empty three times and got two deer twice. These deer live in the thickest brush covered hills you never wanted to see and go nocternal at the first signs of intrusion. I was standing 15 yards from a buck and doe one time and couldn't tell if the buck was legal for almost ten minutes, he wasn't. Because of the hunting condition and stupid regs here I'm a sport hunter. One small deer a year won't qualify me as a meat hunter though I do butcher and process my own meat. There's pig hunting here but 95% of all pigs taken are on private land so Joe Regular can figure on a lot of hunting before he ever sees a pig. That or you'll spend $400 to $500 to hunt with a guide on private land which is sewn up by the guides. It's big bussiness.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
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