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Article on Yahoo news today. A liberal goes to a gun show to see what it is all about

ThatMattGuyThatMattGuy Senior MemberPosts: 666 Senior Member
Looks like a liberal talking head made his way into the Chantilly gun show. If the guy that ran that found him in there he would have been thrown out. lol


http://theweek.com/bullpen/column/240499/what-i-learned-at-the-gun-show

f you've never been to a gun show, you should go. It's worth it simply to get a look at one side of the national debate we're having on firearms, the Second Amendment, and public safety.

I went to a big show in Virginia recently (free admission if you joined the National Rifle Association). Spread out over three days at a sprawling exhibition hall near Dulles Airport, it was packed with buyers and sellers of all kinds of weaponry — from a few super-pricey Browning shotguns ($16,500-$19,000) to a .25-caliber Saturday Night Special for $115.

Gun shows are extraordinarily popular in the United States. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATFE) estimates that more than 5,000 are held annually across the country. Who goes to them? A recent Pew Research survey confirmed much of what you probably assume: Gun owners tend to be white, male, and Southern. And this being Virginia, that's pretty much all I encountered in the packed exhibition hall. Sure, there were blacks, Latinos, and women — but in small numbers. There were kids as well, tagging along with their dads as they perused the aisles of weaponry, knives, clothing, and other wares. And this being Loudoun County, the wealthiest county in America, a few men were well-dressed, corporate-looking types, probably dropping in after work on a Friday night.

A gun show is a vast marketplace for private transactions, many of which are not regulated by law. Supporters of gun rights applaud this, but gun control advocates criticize this so-called "gun-show loophole," which they say allows anyone to buy a gun without having to first pass a federal background check. Anecdotally, I found that most sellers were licensed dealers, but not all. AFTE estimates that between 25 and 50 percent are not.

But gun supporters go so far as to say the term "loophole" is misleading, because a private commercial transaction between two parties is just that — private — and that sellers aren't required to perform background checks if they sell their gun at their kitchen table to a neighbor or relative.

"If those kind of transactions aren't regulated, what's the use tightening regulations at guns shows?" a dealer who identified himself as Richard told me. "You ever heard of the Commerce Clause?"

The Commerce Clause, in case you're unfamiliar, is the part of the Constitution that says the federal government has the right to regulate commerce between states. But who can regulate commerce taking place within a state — say, Virginia? That's a matter of debate. Under the Commerce Clause, states can argue that regulating the sale of firearms within their own borders is their Constitutional right and none of the federal government's business. Gun control advocates see it differently, but for some reason I didn't run into any of them in the exhibition hall.

Most states exercise this right. In 33 states, private gun owners can sell their wares at guns shows — and buyers are not required to undergo background checks. That's why in a prior column, I mentioned Omar Samaha. The Virginia man, whose sister was murdered in the 2007 massacre at Virginia Tech, went to a 2009 gun show on behalf of ABC News, and with $5,000, was able to buy 10 guns in an hour — no questions asked.

I asked Richard — who was wearing a sweatshirt with a picture of an AR-15 (the semi-automatic assault rifle used in the Sandy Hook attack) with the words "I got this for my wife" — how school shootings could be prevented. Needless to say, his answers didn't include banning assault weapons like the AR-15 or limiting the capacity of their magazines, but focusing on mental health. "Adam Lanza was a sicko," Richard said (No argument from me). "Laws need to be better enforced. The government isn't enforcing the laws it already has and now it wants more? No."

He mentioned one in particular: The failure of the government to prosecute people for lying on background forms when trying to buy a gun. He's right. In 2010, some 80,000 Americans were denied guns, according to the Justice Department, because they lied or provided inaccurate information about their criminal background check forms. But only 44 of those people were charged with a crime. Cracking down on these "lie and try" cheaters is one thing both gun supports and opponents actually agree on.

On most gun issues, though, even Sandy Hook has failed to move the needle much. The Pew survey, taken in mid-January, said 51 percent of Americans favor tougher gun control measures, with 45 percent opposing. Two years ago, 47 percent supported tougher measures. In fact, Pew says, long-term support for tougher measures is gradually falling: Five years ago, 58 percent supported tougher laws.

And really, that's what it felt like at the gun show: Same old, same old. Had I attended in 2001 or 2006 or 2009, I imagine it would have felt an awful lot like the event I found in 2013. Even after a horrific gun tragedy, America's gun culture is more or less the same.
The poster formerly known as '69MercCougar

Replies

  • JLDickmonJLDickmon Senior Member Posts: 1,726 Senior Member
    so you talk to one guy at a gun show, and that makes you an expert..
    Never laugh at your wife's choices.
    You are one of them.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    The term "Saturday Night Special" is an abbreviated filthy racist term that the libtard left use to describe inexpensive firearms the poor can afford. I can't post the full term as the auto sensor would crush it like an elephant stepping on a peanut.

    As far as private sales between individuals, that is not a loophole. That's one person selling private property to another, and the government, both state and federal, have no business sticking their noses in it.

    snip< "Gun owners tend to be white, male, and Southern." >snip

    Another disparaging, racist, apologist lie from the loony left 'reporter'; he goes to ONE gun show and makes an all encompassing statement about the whole U.S. in general, and gun shows in particular. How benevolent of him. His article is about as balanced as a teeter totter with an elephant on one side and an ant on another. He's an acolyte of the "tell a lie often enough and it becomes the truth" camp.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    Had I attended in 2001 or 2006 or 2009, I imagine it would have felt an awful lot like the event I found in 2013. Even after a horrific gun tragedy, America's gun culture is more or less the same.

    And why would it change, if the people attending gun shows are law-abiding citizens? What should law-abiding citizens be doing different to keep those awful events from happening?

    All I can think of is to put some armed law abiding citizens between the nutzo's and the people that can't protect themselves. The increase in concealed carry permits seems to suggest that law-abiding citizens are stepping up.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    I object to the "Southern" characterization! The more correct way to say it (I've been to this exact show at least half a dozen times) would be that 60-70% of the attendants can be characterized as "grumpy old white guys" which is pretty much my experience with every gun show, gun shop, or shooting range I've been to and is something I've been doing my part to try and change.

    If this your experience then I would say that you have spent too much time in the upscale "white bread" gun shows and shooting ranges. Back during to the runup to the Clinton assault weapons ban, and I had an 01 FFL, I went to gun shows in my home state of TN, and to shows in GA, AL, NC, and SC. I saw plenty of non-white folks at the shows buying EBRs (Essential Beautiful Rifles), and since I was selling lower parts kits and installing them for a small fee, I got to see the whole spectrum of people attending. And I sold a poo load of SKS rifles at those shows to people 'other than white'. Since then, the gun shows I've been to have shown the same mix of people. Same for the shooting ranges; the ranges in the upscale 'burbs cater to a particular clientele; the lack of people of color may just be an indication of that, and the pricing at those places, and maybe a lack of welcome.


    In my recent experience however I have been seeing this number decline (used to be >90%) with an increase in women, minorities, young people, city slickers, and even liberals getting more interested in shooting sports. This is a very good thing IMHO, but there is still a very long way to go. Yesterday at my range the firing line was completely full and I could count on one hand the number of people who didn't fall into the category of white men over 40.

    Again, look at the places where your shooting occurs, the pricing of the ranges, and the demographics of the surrounding area. People shoot at the places they can afford. And they go to the closest and cheapest places if their financial situation dictates that they cannot afford the upscale places. Pardon me, but your affluence is showing. :tooth:

    To put it in a nutshell, people go to shooting ranges they can afford. Gun shows in places with a clearly predominant white population will have fewer non white people. Gun shows held in places with a wider mix of races will show a wider mix of races attending the shows, at least in my experience.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • ThatMattGuyThatMattGuy Senior Member Posts: 666 Senior Member
    None of this is to say that people in the "gun community" actively exclude other people or give them a hard time (except for maybe us liberals), but we certainly could do a better job of reaching out to groups and individuals that don't necessarily grow up with "gun culture". As I said, I see things moving in the right direction and improving quite a bit just in the short time I've been a gun owner, but we still have a long way to go.
    We do not need to reach out to the middle ground folks. Right now Obama and his gun hating croonies have created a climate that is getting people who normally do not buy guns.....to go out and buy guns and ammo. It is impossible for the gun community to reach out to the liberals. Liberals want it all their way. Anything outside their little utopian box they live in is wrong to them. The only compromise they are interested in is when thier political opposites give up everything and conform and submit to the liberal agenda. Even Juan Williams said that in an article on The Blaze.com the other day.
    The poster formerly known as '69MercCougar
  • sgtrock21sgtrock21 Senior Member Posts: 1,933 Senior Member
    I object to the "Southern" characterization! The more correct way to say it (I've been to this exact show at least half a dozen times) would be that 60-70% of the attendants can be characterized as "grumpy old white guys" which is pretty much my experience with every gun show, gun shop, or shooting range I've been to and is something I've been doing my part to try and change. In my recent experience however I have been seeing this number decline (used to be >90%) with an increase in women, minorities, young people, city slickers, and even liberals getting more interested in shooting sports. This is a very good thing IMHO, but there is still a very long way to go. Yesterday at my range the firing line was completely full and I could count on one hand the number of people who didn't fall into the category of white men over 40.
    I object to the Southern (stereotype) characterization. I am not even Southern. I was born and raised in Oregon except for about 3 years in "The Peoples Republic Of California" in the mid 70s. I have spent quite a bit of time in the South. The only Southern state I have not visited is South Carolina I am including Southeast, Southcentral(Texas) and Southwest. I was in Virginia for 7 weeks. Virginia is the far Northern South but I attended a gun show in Newport News. It had an attendance of about the same "melting pot" as the rest of the U.S.. I have never met the Southern stereotype in the South. People I have met there may or may not speak with a drawl. Are friendly, polite, and helpful. The opposite of NYC!
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