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Hunting coyotes during whelping season. Yea or nay?

JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior MemberPodunk, Tx.Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
Six-Gun has a fishing trip out here planned for mid-April, and has suggested we take a day to go after coyotes. There's no shortage of them around here, and I'm pretty sure I can find plenty of places to hunt. However, that's during whelping season and I'm a bit conflicted as to the ethics of this.

I can see how shooting a female that is weaning pups would certainly cut down on the overall population, or even shooting a male who is hunting for his brood could do the same. And, according to the CDOW guy I just spoke to, most of the pups are weaned by late April. So, I figure that a lot of them are weaned by mid-April.

Most, if not all, of the ranchers I've talked to over the years don't really care one way or the other about coyotes. They don't consider them a threat to their livestock.

So, how about some feedback on how you see this? Do you consider it unethical, or ok?
Jerry

Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.

Replies

  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Living in a van, down by the river.Posts: 14,034 Senior Member
    Just curious, but why are you planning on shooting the coyotes? If it's to control predator numbers, I would think the whelping season is the ideal time to do so. If it's for fur, then I can see how you might want to avoid it.

    Incidentally, from a practical standpoint there's no real difference between killing a coyote just before whelping season than there is in killing one during it, other than the presence of pups. If you kill a female, you've either killed one before it breeds or when it whelps, and if you kill a male you're either killing one that will be hunting for the brood or one that is.
    I'm just here for snark.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 28,061 Senior Member
    Whatever you do, don't shoot them stem to stern with a .404 Jeffery. That would be unethical. Starving pups is fine.

    :-)
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,281 Senior Member
    We generally do not hunt during pup time. While predator control is one aspect of why we hunt coyotes, the predominant reason is because we enjoy it so there is no benefit to be gained by killing off the population (can't do that by hunting anyway). The biggest reason for not hunting during pup time is because I'm getting old and soft, the idea of starving a litter of pups because I shot the nursing female rubs me the wrong way... That being said, season on "problem coyotes", those that appear to be getting habituated to people, hang around the ranch buildings or livestock, is always open...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Olsburg KansasPosts: 1,650 Senior Member
    If it is legal then to each his own. Like Jayhawker said- one in my yard is open season especially since our mini- dachshund was attacked by one and our Rat terrier had his throat punctured, causing him to be put down from the wound.
  • beartrackerbeartracker Senior Member Posts: 3,116 Senior Member
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Eastern NebraskaPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
    1965Jeff wrote: »
    If it is legal then to each his own. Like Jayhawker said- one in my yard is open season especially since our mini- dachshund was attacked by one and our Rat terrier had his throat punctured, causing him to be put down from the wound.
    Yikes! That's the kind of stuff that happen around here. A lot of people in Las Vegas own little yip dogs, which in a desert loaded with coyotes is a formula for disaster. It seems like every other day, my dogs locator microchip service sends out lost pet notifications for some chihuahua or teacup poodle. I don't want to break to the owners, but it's far more likely that their precious pet was snatched up and scarfed down as dinner by a pack of yotes than taken by someone desperate for a pet.

    North of here, the sheep ranchers are the ones who really hate them. One guy who I met while he was on horseback while I during my mule deer hunt this past season said he hhad lost something like 14 sheep in the last month to coyotes. He had a shoot-on-sight policy around the ranch. In fact, the coyote I shot with my .44 mag during that hunt was killed a stone's throw from his place.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Podunk, Tx.Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    Funny you should mention sheep, Luis. There's a guy about 5 miles from here who runs sheep. Mike and I have shot prairie dogs off of his place before, and also tried our hand at coyotes. The only problem is that he doesn't have a lot of property, and what he does have is as flat as a board and devoid of any cover. I'm thinking of asking him about some of his neighbors to give us a better set up.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Eastern NebraskaPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    Funny you should mention sheep, Luis. There's a guy about 5 miles from here who runs sheep. Mike and I have shot prairie dogs off of his place before, and also tried our hand at coyotes. The only problem is that he doesn't have a lot of property, and what he does have is as flat as a board and devoid of any cover. I'm thinking of asking him about some of his neighbors to give us a better set up.

    That would be an excellent option. When you're stuck with utterly flat terrain, your best option is laying as flat as possible and using some sort of bush or ghille suit, preferably one that matches the local grasses, but that's a tough order in Eastern CO where grass is short, brown and about half as long as a finger on a good day. If that's what we've got, though, it's still worth a shot. A lot of times, all you really need is a dog curious enough to want to see what you are. I've had them get within 75 yards of a work SUV, purely to figure out where the hell the rabbit could be inside of that strange, white object that has a human in it. That's a dog that would dead as a doorknob anywhere that I had a gun.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Colorado SpringsPosts: 7,821 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    Mike and I have shot prairie dogs off of his place before, and also tried our hand at coyotes. The only problem is
    his dog. Don't forget his darn dog. Shooting a few pdogs was kind of nerve-wracking that day, because, IIRC, when you were drawing down on a pdog you never knew when a real dog would come breezing through your scope.

    If the dog has moved on to a "better place" (or is locked up in the barn) you might get a 'yote. If not....probably not.

    As to the time of year question, I don't have strong feelings either way. I figure I've shot enough pregnant pdogs and pdog pups that a 'yote or two probably won't tip the balance of the scales either way.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Eastern NebraskaPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Oh, boy. A domestic dog known to be on the loose could be a deal-breaker. I know that my own pup is absolutely mesmerised by distress calls and will barge full-tilt into the room on a string from wherever he is if I start wailing on one in the house. He's only a few genes seperated from his coyote cousins, I guess. The last thing we need is for one of us to feed the landowner's pooch a lead pill by accident.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Colorado SpringsPosts: 7,821 Senior Member
    Yeah, that dog was something. Didn't matter if he saw what direction you were shooting or not, at the shot, he'd be off like a flash somewhere downrange acting the fool. And he never got tired of doing it, either.

    But, OTOH, I've been mobbed by cows, had my bench knocked over by horses (while a different one was busy licking the upholstery off my truck seat....note to self....don't leave truck window down in horsie country), lost a stare-down with a kit fox, been "cornered" by multiple rattlesnakes in deep grass, and thought I was loosing my mind when I kept catching glimpses of 20 MPH tarantulas while laying in a dried out waterhole. It can get worse. I'm sure there's some yellowjackets buried up out there somewhere.

    Looking back, I don't mind that dog so much after all.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Kaniksu Nat'l Forest, IDPosts: 5,486 Senior Member
    Shooting coyotes in spring is a great way to save new fawns.
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,281 Senior Member
    CaliFFL wrote: »
    Shooting coyotes in spring is a great way to save new fawns.

    Depends entirely where you live....given the size of the deer herd here, the few coyotes take don't make a bit of difference. Of course in your neck of the woods, you have their larger cousins to contend with as well....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Kaniksu Nat'l Forest, IDPosts: 5,486 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Depends entirely where you live....given the size of the deer herd here, the few coyotes take don't make a bit of difference. Of course in your neck of the woods, you have their larger cousins to contend with as well....

    Very true. Our hunting seasons and limits are now dictated almost entirely by how much damage the canines have done to the herds. We lost the cow elk season last year. I haven't even looked at the regs this year.
    When our governing officials dismiss due process as mere semantics, when they exercise powers they don’t have and ignore duties they actually bear, and when we let them get away with it, we have ceased to be our own rulers.

    Adam J. McCleod


  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 28,061 Senior Member
    Ironically, with as many as I've seen or had opportunity at, I've never killed a coyote. Just never really had a desire.

    Now, I'm sure I will some day. Maybe when one presents itself at a time when I'm not previously engaged. It's gonna happen one day, just because. But, I don't see me making a habit of it. Not into predator hunting, personally.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member God's countryPosts: 4,646 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Personally, I don't see any ethical problem killing yodel dogs any time it's legal to do so, but that's just me.
    :beer:

    i think if you hunt in a state that seasons and bag limits are set by biologists and not politicians then yeah, knock yourself out and good hunting.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Under a logPosts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Coyotes are a problem where I live; they are way too prolific. I only know of a few people that actively hunt them; too danged hard to get permission to hunt on private land. Starting in late March through August I use a fawn bleat call a lot. If a coyote shows up, well, too bad for the coyote. They are really hard on the fawn population here. Ditto for the rabbit population.

    About the only time you can get permission to hunt is if the coyotes are targeting newborn calves. After calving season is over, no more hunting.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    Six-Gun has a fishing trip out here planned for mid-April, and has suggested we take a day to go after coyotes. There's no shortage of them around here, and I'm pretty sure I can find plenty of places to hunt. However, that's during whelping season and I'm a bit conflicted as to the ethics of this.

    I can see how shooting a female that is weaning pups would certainly cut down on the overall population, or even shooting a male who is hunting for his brood could do the same. And, according to the CDOW guy I just spoke to, most of the pups are weaned by late April. So, I figure that a lot of them are weaned by mid-April.

    Most, if not all, of the ranchers I've talked to over the years don't really care one way or the other about coyotes. They don't consider them a threat to their livestock.

    So, how about some feedback on how you see this? Do you consider it unethical, or ok?

    I put coyotes about a half a step above hogs. The more you kill the better. And I don't care how you kill em. To me ethics doesn't enter this picture. And at least you can eat hogs. Now I don't wanna hear that they're good to eat, I'm not eatin one of the mangie things, I don't care if you tell me it taste like Filet mignon,:rotflmao::roll2::rotflmao:
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Southwest PAPosts: 2,907 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    Whatever you do, don't shoot them stem to stern with a .404 Jeffery. That would be unethical. Starving pups is fine.

    :-)

    :rotflmao: ...You need to put that heavy .243 to work on some coyotes. :love:

    Not sure that I could do it personally, but I don't find it unethical. Not sure why I feel that way though, because I will whack a groundhog no matter.
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