Most/More Accurate Bullet?

Diver43Diver43 Senior MemberPosts: 8,664 Senior Member
While at the Gun Show this past weekend I was looking for ammunition, just about any reasonably price ammo for any of the guns that I have.
Ended up in a discussion about one bullet being more accurate than another. This man seems to have known what he was talking about, but to be honest if I would have little knowledge on this stuff. Bottom line is he stated that a Lead bullet will be more accurate than a jacketed bullet without question. Reason being is that lead will expand and complely fill the barrel as it is propelled through and out the barrel in a straight line. A jacketed bullet while close, will allow gasses to escape around it which would allow for a slightly difference in impact with each and every shot.
Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5

Replies

  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,235 Senior Member
    I don't think so. Jacketed bullets are engraved with the rifling which shows they pretty much fill the barrel. At handgun velocities, lead is fine, but push it much and it will lead the barrel and take away from accuracy.

    I also assume he was talking about handgun bullets, right?
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 8,664 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    I don't think so. Jacketed bullets are engraved with the rifling which shows they pretty much fill the barrel. At handgun velocities, lead is fine, but push it much and it will lead the barrel and take away from accuracy.

    I also assume he was talking about handgun bullets, right?

    Yes handguns, sorry i should have made that clear.
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,967 Senior Member
    In some cases lead may be more accurate as in the OP, such as a lead 9mm in a
    .357 convertible; however, like all shooting, you have to try it and see.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 7,041 Senior Member
    Ummmmmmm. . .no.

    Lead CAN be very accurate - assuming you get it alloyed right for a hardness appropriate for the pressures & velocities of the round in question, get the bullet sized to the correct diameter for your bore or cylinder throats, use a lube that functions reliably & consistently over the range of temperatures encountered. On top of controlling a host of other variables, this stuff - done correctly - is what prevents lead buildup in the bore. For best results, all of this stuff is typically custom-tuned to the gun in question. Overhard factory-cast bullets with overhard lube probably are not going to be world-beaters.

    On the topic of lead expanding to fill the bore: When you hear guys complaining about having to scrub lead out of their barrels, IT IS USUALLY BECAUSE THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT THE BULLET FAILED TO DO. At some point in the process, hot gas managed to jet around the side of the bullet, vaporizing some of the lead, which then gets deposited on the barrel surface. This can be due to bullet too hard, bullet incorrectly sized (too small), insufficient or non-performing lube, inconsistencies in the bore, or (in the case of revolvers) issues between throat and bore dimensions. Too big a bullet can also play into leading - not as often as too small, but sizing down too much while firing can leave skid marks.

    There are plenty of variables involved with getting jacketed bullets to group well, but the jacket chops all of those variables right off the top of the list. If you can be totally in control of all of those variables, an argument could be made, but it is far, FAR easier to get a jacketed bullet to perform consistently - especially if we are talking about one load performing in a multitude of guns.

    Worth considering in this discussion - many shooters of higher velocity handgun or rifle bullets apply a device called a gas check to the back of the bullet. This is a simple cup of copper that helps to keep those hot gasses sealed behind the bullet - they've basically added a cheap, partial jacket to the section of the slug that needs it most.

    I've been at the bullet casting game for. . .I guess about five years, and I hang at another forum dedicated to the process. There are guys out there that take the cast bullet game to a high art, but I can't escape the fact that I can typically have a new rifle shooting under one MOA with the second batch of jacketed I take to the range, without ever having slugged a bore, weighed a bullet, or treated a round with special care to prevent damage to that bullet. And, without any of that special effort, I'm driving them at speeds that massively reduce the need to correctly range-find and read wind - speeds that would have cast slugs breaking down in the tube.

    Like I said, lead CAN be very accurate - the fact that we aren't chasing bison out of our petunia patches attests to this - but more accurate, without question, all the time? Not hardly.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
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