Hypothetical quesiton: .260 Remington/6.5 Creedmoor for elk?

breamfisherbreamfisher Senior MemberPosts: 13,101 Senior Member
I was kicking this around the other day. Assuming you can get bullets that are tough enough for the game, how do you think a .260 Rem/6.5 Creedmoor would do for elk? I mean, in Europe they use the 6.5 Swede for Moose, right? And the .260 Rem/6.5 Creedmoor are pretty close to that ballistically, right?

What sort of range limitations do you think one would be looking at? What bullet do you think would be suitable?

I'm not planning anything, just pondering...
Overkill is underrated.
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Replies

  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,611 Senior Member
    Bullets

    129gr Accubond LR (SD .264 / BC .561)
    129gr Interbond (SD .264 / BC .485)
    130gr Accubond (SD .266 / BC .488)
    130gr Scirocco (SD .266 / BC .571)

    Just to name a few.

    With the .260 Remington, I'd have no qualms shooting one out to 400/500 yards depending on conditions.

    At 500 yards, you're still over 2,000 fps.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,539 Senior Member
    :agree:
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,101 Senior Member
    For further information, a petite young lady that some friends of mine know wears some elk ivory from a memorable hunt she took. The elk looked nice (to me), no idea about size.

    She used a .243 in New Mexico I believe. I don't know how hunting conditions there differ from other areas, but I also know a fellow in Montana who killed a cow elk or 3 with his 7-08. I figured that if either of those would do, why not the one in between.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,611 Senior Member
    Mark LaRue did it with a Grendel and the .260 packs more lunch.

    Mark20LaRue20LaRue20Tactical20-205x520bull20taken20with20an20AR1520chambered20in20a20206_5mm20Grendel.jpg
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,611 Senior Member
    Biggest elk I've ever seen on a hunt (7x8) was killed with a .243 Winchester. Course, the shot was in the neck under 40 yards, but that sucker slid to a stop like someone roped his front legs from behind.

    All about using something capable of producing results where you put the bullet.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,508 Senior Member
    My ex-BIL used a 243 for years. Neck shots. My SIL took one with a 25-06.

    You might have to pass on frontal or raking shots, but it ought to work just fine with good placement.
  • justin10mmjustin10mm Senior Member Posts: 688 Senior Member
    125gr. Partition is what I'd probably use.
  • rapier5316rapier5316 Member Posts: 312 Member
    140 grainers are the traditional aulk load for the Swede Mauser. The sectional density does all the penetration chores.
    "The power of the United States has peaked, oppression follows." Robert Prector, Socionomics.net
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,035 Senior Member
    I would use a 130 AB or Scirroco
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,844 Senior Member
    Well, since I'd have no qualms about taking one on with my Grendel and my 120 TTSX load, upping the MV to 260 speed, a Barnes 127 LRX or the ones Zedrick listed should be able to handle one nicely.
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,851 Senior Member
    I have no doubt that a 6mm or 6.5 mm bullet will bring down an elk. It's mostly about shot placement and especially if you can slip even a 100 grain well constructed bullet between the ribs into the boiler room it will work fine. However, for my dollar, if I'm going to spend $1500 to $2000 on the hunt of a lifetime, I'm bringing something in a magnum category like my 7 Rem. Mag or even my 300 Wby with good bullets of 160 to 200 grains respectively. I have no doubt that under ideal conditions my .270 Win. with 150 grain bullets will bring a large elk down at out to 300 yards, but I know that I can also do that with insurance with the other two mentioned rifles, and then some.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,035 Senior Member
    I will typically use a 7mm or a 338
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    140 gr cup and core bullet in the 6.5's have gotten the job done for nearly a century before elk went thru the major metamorphis that makes them almost bullet proof in the minds of many with precious little real world experience.
    When the 260 first came out in the model 7 , and friend of mine got his grandson one for Christmas. That young fella put as many bull elk on the meat pole as his dad and granddad did with their 338 ultramags...He still shoots that rifle as his main hunting gun to this day.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,851 Senior Member
    Ranch13 wrote: »
    140 gr cup and core bullet in the 6.5's have gotten the job done for nearly a century before elk went thru the major metamorphis that makes them almost bullet proof in the minds of many with precious little real world experience.
    When the 260 first came out in the model 7 , and friend of mine got his grandson one for Christmas. That young fella put as many bull elk on the meat pole as his dad and granddad did with their 338 ultramags...He still shoots that rifle as his main hunting gun to this day.

    If that's your opinion and that's what turns your crank get after it. I have no qualms over it.I don't think it's immoral or unethical at all. I have said that I believe that a 6.5 will do the job, even a 6mm caliber. All I am saying is if I have something bigger to bring to the table I will. Elk are bigger than deer so I like a bigger caliber-bullet. But that's my own opinion of how I will do it. Then again, I have never seen an elk when I had an implement in my hands capable of taking one. I've never been elk hunting. I'm just going by what I believe is the most expedient way of killing one. I'd hate to spend a bunch of money and get the shot of my life and have it walk off.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    If that's your opinion and that's what turns your crank get after it. I have no qualms over it.I don't think it's immoral or unethical at all. I have said that I believe that a 6.5 will do the job, even a 6mm caliber. All I am saying is if I have something bigger to bring to the table I will. Elk are bigger than deer so I like a bigger caliber-bullet. But that's my own opinion of how I will do it. Then again, I have never seen an elk when I had an implement in my hands capable of taking one. I've never been elk hunting. I'm just going by what I believe is the most expedient way of killing one. I'd hate to spend a bunch of money and get the shot of my life and have it walk off.

    Suit yourself Snake, but I'm pretty sure I've probably killed more elk with a 243 than you'll kill in your lifetime. This horsespit about "enough" gun is usually brought about by folks that have precious little experience with elk and elk hunting. It really doesn't matter what the diameter of the bullet , bullet placement is what kills, and a 100 gr 243 thru the heart/lungs will kill an elk quicker, than a 250 gr 338 thru the paunch.
    I always get the giggles to a certain point when ballistic experts tell us that the 243,30-30, 250 etc are no good on elk, but by god lets take our 44 magnum handgun out and kill a bushel basket full... Or take one of the nogood cartridges in a rifle, put it in a tc contender/Encore, and you're good to go....
    So get yourself off the computer, out into the field and grab a handful of experience. Won't take long to figure out elk are nowhere near the Kevlar and ceramic coated super beast that some with high post counts on internet forums believe them to be.
    If you don't have the gumption to go out and gain useful experience, you may want to take a few minutes and look up some of the writings from folks like Les Bowman, and Bob Milek.
  • KSU FirefighterKSU Firefighter Senior Member Posts: 3,246 Senior Member
    Ranch13 wrote: »
    Suit yourself Snake, but I'm pretty sure I've probably killed more elk with a 243 than you'll kill in your lifetime. This horsespit about "enough" gun is usually brought about by folks that have precious little experience with elk and elk hunting. It really doesn't matter what the diameter of the bullet , bullet placement is what kills, and a 100 gr 243 thru the heart/lungs will kill an elk quicker, than a 250 gr 338 thru the paunch.
    I always get the giggles to a certain point when ballistic experts tell us that the 243,30-30, 250 etc are no good on elk, but by god lets take our 44 magnum handgun out and kill a bushel basket full... Or take one of the nogood cartridges in a rifle, put it in a tc contender/Encore, and you're good to go....
    So get yourself off the computer, out into the field and grab a handful of experience. Won't take long to figure out elk are nowhere near the Kevlar and ceramic coated super beast that some with high post counts on internet forums believe them to be.
    If you don't have the gumption to go out and gain useful experience, you may want to take a few minutes and look up some of the writings from folks like Les Bowman, and Bob Milek.

    How many are killed with archery equipment every year? How many were killed by muzzleloaders, .44-40, etc. ? Some folks could, ( and probably have), kill Elk with a 223. Others should probably not be trusted to try it with anything less than a 177 mm howitzer. (Full disclosure, I have never killed an Elk!) I am a firm believer in shot placement though. Seen how important it is from my own experiences on deer.
    The fire service needs a "culture of extinguishment not safety" Ray McCormack FDNY
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,545 Senior Member
    Ranch13 wrote: »
    So get yourself off the computer, out into the field and grab a handful of experience. Won't take long to figure out elk are nowhere near the Kevlar and ceramic coated super beast that some with high post counts on internet forums believe them to be.
    If you don't have the gumption to go out and gain useful experience, you may want to take a few minutes and look up some of the writings from folks like Les Bowman, and Bob Milek.

    And therein lies the rub. Gaining useful experience is much easier said than done when you live a thousand or more miles from the closest elk country. Even if you come to a place like Colorado, which has lots of huntable public land along with over the counter tags, it still makes for a tough hunt. Every elk hunt I've ever made has been on public land, and most in open areas. Just seeing elk can be a major accomplishment.

    Last year, MileHighShooter and I sort of sponsored some out of state members on an elk hunt. JBOHIO took a nice 5x5bull, but that was all that was taken. I didn't witness the shot, but I heard about it, and it wasn't the kind for which you could easily place the bullet right in the boiler room. As I was told, the animal was running, at a distance of about 220 yards, also at about a 20 degree uphill angle from where Joe was. In other words, sometimes you can't pick your shot and have to take what's presented. In a situation such as that, having something that can break bone and penetrate all the way through the internals to the off-side shoulder is very nice to have.

    With that being said, here's a suggestion. Why don't you sponsor some out of state guys on an elk hunt? Maybe you can help Snake get some of that experience. Take him some place you know well, and help him get his first elk on his first hunt.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    And therein lies the rub. Gaining useful experience is much easier said than done when you live a thousand or more miles from the closest elk country. Even if you come to a place like Colorado, which has lots of huntable public land along with over the counter tags, it still makes for a tough hunt. Every elk hunt I've ever made has been on public land, and most in open areas. Just seeing elk can be a major accomplishment.

    With that being said, here's a suggestion. Why don't you sponsor some out of state guys on an elk hunt? Maybe you can help Snake get some of that experience. Take him some place you know well, and help him get his first elk on his first hunt.

    Jerry I've done that in the past, and now with my increasing age, don't really want to go thru all the trouble. As you know there's more to setting up elk camp than just blundering in and having a good time. Plus there's also bit about getting home and taking care of the tents , stoves and all the equipment.It's enough problem to do that for someone I know and like, let alone some stranger I've never met. When I used to do that for someone I've never met, it was called guiding, and there was a little money involved.
    Not to mention the difficulty in getting a nonresident a license, it might be 10 years before someone could draw a license, it might happen the first time they try.
    Also with the situation on the ranch anymore, I can't guarantee I would be able to go when the time comes. Have had that happen a time or two when friends from Iowa and Mississippi had to go alone for the first few days, and once I wasn't able to make it at all.
    Colorado licenses are easy to get , you take him. I've seen enough elk killed ,and heard enough ing about the cost of a license etc at the end of 10 days of really miserable hunting and no shot fired, to last me to the end of my days. When I do go hunting now, it's with someone I know and like.
    And neither his nor your post have much to do with the reality of things, and during the 50's and 60's there was no shortage of 6.5's (swedes, mannlichers, carcano, and ****) that filled elk tags. They did it then they'll still do it now. Just takes someone with the ability to put the round where it needs to go.
    Never mind the direct experience I've witnessed with a young man and his 260. I could go into the friend of mine that put together a 260 with an Ackley chamber and smacked one of the biggest bulls ever taken in the Laramie Peak area with a 140 gr. sierra game king... Not my" opinion" , just sharing real world experiences.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,611 Senior Member
    Ranch,

    I actually agree with you on this argument of cartridge capability. Regardless, you still act an egotistical prick in your presentation.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    Ranch,

    I actually agree with you on this argument of cartridge capability. Regardless, you still act an egotistical prick in your presentation.

    Best I can tell you is if answering a question with real world experience is being an "egostitical prick" then so be it.
    But no matter how you slice/dice it, those 6.5's with their long skinny bullets and moderate velocity just flat get the job done. And they still haven't built the elk, that an ordinary cup and core bullet from a non magnum cartridge, will bounce off of.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,611 Senior Member
    Ranch13 wrote: »
    But no matter how you slice/dice it, those 6.5's with their long skinny bullets and moderate velocity just flat get the job done. And they still haven't built the elk, that an ordinary cup and core bullet from a non magnum cartridge, will bounce off of.

    It's all in how you word it. Intentional or not.

    But, the quote above I agree with.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,851 Senior Member
    Ranch13 wrote: »
    Suit yourself Snake, but I'm pretty sure I've probably killed more elk with a 243 than you'll kill in your lifetime. This horsespit about "enough" gun is usually brought about by folks that have precious little experience with elk and elk hunting. It really doesn't matter what the diameter of the bullet , bullet placement is what kills, and a 100 gr 243 thru the heart/lungs will kill an elk quicker, than a 250 gr 338 thru the paunch.
    I always get the giggles to a certain point when ballistic experts tell us that the 243,30-30, 250 etc are no good on elk, but by god lets take our 44 magnum handgun out and kill a bushel basket full... Or take one of the nogood cartridges in a rifle, put it in a tc contender/Encore, and you're good to go....
    So get yourself off the computer, out into the field and grab a handful of experience. Won't take long to figure out elk are nowhere near the Kevlar and ceramic coated super beast that some with high post counts on internet forums believe them to be.
    If you don't have the gumption to go out and gain useful experience, you may want to take a few minutes and look up some of the writings from folks like Les Bowman, and Bob Milek.

    My god Ranch I already said all that stuff you're talking about. I said I had never been elk hunting. Never, and I admit it. All Im saying is that If I have something bigger I'll bring it, because just as you said about bringing ENOUGH gun, I say the same in reverse that I don't believe you can have overkill. I have a friend that shoots Texas Whitetail deer with a .375 H&H. if you ask him why he will tell you very simply, "Because I don't like to see em run away!" And also because everone tells me thatin elk country you may get LONG shots, Well I do believe at long range you have a much better chance of putting down a large animal with a bigger rifle. I'm not doubting what you say, but if you read my post you'll see I already admitted everything you said BEFORE you said it.

    And BTW, I'm an ol' cantankerous SO........ B also. But around here we have this chronic shortage of Elk. So therefore unless I pack my old But up north I don't get to shoot at too many around here and they take a dim view of shooting them in the Zoo. There's some out in West Texas, but distance wise that's almost to Colorado, so I've never been. I've killed three truck loads of white tail and hogs, but never any mule deer or elk. But I do have an idea about shooting at 300+ Yards and how energy bleeds off a bullet way out there. So that's why I would prefer insurance. Yeah you may have seen 70 dozen killed with a .243 and you may have done so yourself. But they're in your back yard and it's not like if you go elk hunting it's probably going to be your last hunt. But for me if I'm having to spend that much money and drive for a day and a half, I may not get to do it but once or twice in my life. So I want my odds of killing one if I get a shot to be pretty high. So yeah, I'll over gun.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Ranch13Ranch13 Senior Member Posts: 820 Senior Member
    Snake, no the elk are not in my back yard. Elk hunting was in the past the family vacation, and winter meat gathering expedition. We packed up camp and groceries and we drove all day to get to the mountains and set up camp.
    What I posted in my first post here was actual experience gained over 50 + years of been there done that. You come along and tell me "well if that's your opinion" No son that's not my opinion, that's the way it happened.
    I've been hunting and saw many a texas license plate in both Wyoming and Colorado, so don't let a 16 hour drive scare you out, a lot of us drive 8 hours to shoot those elk in our" backyard"
    I have an opinion about shooting 300 yds, and from most of what I can tell by reading the internet stories, there's a ton of folks could use a good range finder(most don't realize just how small a game animal looks 1/4 mile off let alone the 1/2mile+ often spoke of), and a chronograph would probably clear up a ton of hype before they even left home. Most elk if truth be told are shot at or close to 200 yds or less.
    Glad them jackrabbits you call deer down there drop at the shot from a 375 ouchnouch because 2 different elk and a couple of antelope I've seen shot with the thing , were dang lucky to be recovered.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,035 Senior Member
    Between both of my kids and myself we have killed one Bull and two cows with the 260 Remington.
    It was a 14" barrel though so the performance would be around a 6.5 BR or 6.5 BR improved.
    All went down quickly.
    Shot placement was excellent.
    Most of my elk have been killed with the rifle performance of a 7-08. Several of those were under 250 yards, but most were further. Never lost any of them.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,101 Senior Member
    Guys, just to be clear I'm not asking about a once-in-a-lifetime hunt where I have to take the shot in the fading light on the last day at 400 yds. away. For that sort of thing, yeah, you go big. I'm just asking about if a .260 would be good given proper shot placement and conditions. Seems it would.

    Incidentally, I was reading an article the other day where the author quoted Teddy Roosevelt on the .30-30 (Roosevelt was writing about the time of the cartridge's introduction.) He produced a one-shot kill on a pronghorn with an open-sighted at .30-30, can't remember the yardage. Obviously the .30-30 isn't ideal for pronghorn, but folks have taken them with them. Heck, folks have taken moose with .30-30s. And at one time, that might have been one of the best chamberings for pronghorn. Because it was new. I'm just wondering if folks who have experience think a .260 would take an elk. Looks like it will.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 7,038 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    All about using something capable of producing results where you put the bullet.

    Yup!

    Kennedy's "Magic Bullet" that drilled straight through two human torsos with no to little deviation is all the proof one should need that a 6.5 properly wielded would be suitable for elk, but one needs to remember that elk are sturdy critters with strengths that need to be worked around. The one elk I've been in on the demise of was a 4x4 bull that took a quality pill from a .338 RUM in the shoulder from about 450 yards. Only shrapnel and bone fragment made it through the bone into the chest cavity, requiring some exhausting follow up work.

    This was pretty heady stuff to contemplate - If a .338 Ultra Mag isn't enough to break one of these monsters, then what is? The answer seems pretty straightforward: You don't try to take out a battle tank by going though it's heavy frontal armor - you go for the thin spots. My current conclusion is that elk are animals that spend their lives at 5000+ feet of altitude, jogging everywhere they go - trying to defeat the primary muscles and bones that support that activity with any rifle you'd want to carry and shoot is silly. The good news is an elk is as susceptible to a cardiovascular kill as a deer is, and the upscaling of artillery needed to make THAT penetration (which doesn't involve those heavy bones and muscles) is really not that extreme, and a 6.5 will do fine. Choose a bullet that drills, don't get stupid with the range, avoid any bone bigger than a rib, and go for the heart.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,851 Senior Member
    Ranch13 wrote: »
    Snake, no the elk are not in my back yard. Elk hunting was in the past the family vacation, and winter meat gathering expedition. We packed up camp and groceries and we drove all day to get to the mountains and set up camp.
    What I posted in my first post here was actual experience gained over 50 + years of been there done that. You come along and tell me "well if that's your opinion" No son that's not my opinion, that's the way it happened.
    I've been hunting and saw many a texas license plate in both Wyoming and Colorado, so don't let a 16 hour drive scare you out, a lot of us drive 8 hours to shoot those elk in our" backyard"
    I have an opinion about shooting 300 yds, and from most of what I can tell by reading the internet stories, there's a ton of folks could use a good range finder(most don't realize just how small a game animal looks 1/4 mile off let alone the 1/2mile+ often spoke of), and a chronograph would probably clear up a ton of hype before they even left home. Most elk if truth be told are shot at or close to 200 yds or less.
    Glad them jackrabbits you call deer down there drop at the shot from a 375 ouchnouch because 2 different elk and a couple of antelope I've seen shot with the thing , were dang lucky to be recovered.

    Well, that story about my friend and his .375 H&H is an extreme case just to show that some of us like insurance. But no way in hell I'm shooting a deer OR elk (if I get the opportunity) with a cannon like that. I would feel a bit overgunned with my 300 WBY for most hunting. To tell the truth, I'd probably opt for my 7 mag. A 7 Rem. Or even Wby is just a .270 or .280 on Steroids. Those rifles give you a little advantage with distance, but in view of my past record on long shots, I can tell you I haven't taken many. Long range shooting, shots past 300-400 yards, in my opinion, is another skill altogether.

    Also, I agree with you 200% about those claimed distances. Depending on the back drop and topography, 100 yards can very easily look to be 200 or more. Of course I've been fooled the opposite way too. But in my experience, it's usually that ranges are overestimated more than under. Usually anyway. I know there are exceptions.

    Also, yeah maybe I sound like an overgunner, but I do it out of ignorance. I admit this. Most deer I've taken have been with my .270, my 6mm, and all my other rifles have been at or under 200 yards, many at under 100. If I have never made a shot on something and it's in strange country at long range, I will usually opt for something bigger, as like I said, insurance. And I admit, that's due to my inexperience in hunting in the mountainous North West.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,851 Senior Member
    Ranch13 wrote: »
    Snake, no the elk are not in my back yard. Elk hunting was in the past the family vacation, and winter meat gathering expedition. We packed up camp and groceries and we drove all day to get to the mountains and set up camp.
    What I posted in my first post here was actual experience gained over 50 + years of been there done that. You come along and tell me "well if that's your opinion" No son that's not my opinion, that's the way it happened.
    I've been hunting and saw many a texas license plate in both Wyoming and Colorado, so don't let a 16 hour drive scare you out, a lot of us drive 8 hours to shoot those elk in our" backyard"
    I have an opinion about shooting 300 yds, and from most of what I can tell by reading the internet stories, there's a ton of folks could use a good range finder(most don't realize just how small a game animal looks 1/4 mile off let alone the 1/2mile+ often spoke of), and a chronograph would probably clear up a ton of hype before they even left home. Most elk if truth be told are shot at or close to 200 yds or less.
    Glad them jackrabbits you call deer down there drop at the shot from a 375 ouchnouch because 2 different elk and a couple of antelope I've seen shot with the thing , were dang lucky to be recovered.

    Well, that story about my friend and his .375 H&H is an extreme case just to show that some of us like insurance. But no way in hell I'm shooting a deer OR elk (if I get the opportunity) with a cannon like that. I would feel a bit overgunned with my 300 WBY for most hunting. To tell the truth, I'd probably opt for my 7 mag. A 7 Rem. Mag Or even 7 Wby Mag. is just a .270 or .280 on Steroids. Those rifles give you a little advantage with distance, but in view of my past record on long shots, I can tell you I haven't taken many. Long range shooting, shots past 300-400 yards, in my opinion, is another skill altogether.

    Also, I agree with you 200% about those claimed distances. Depending on the back drop and topography, 100 yards can very easily look to be 200 or more. Of course I've been fooled the opposite way too. But in my experience, it's usually that ranges are overestimated more than under. Usually anyway. I know there are exceptions.

    Also, yeah maybe I sound like an overgunner, but I do it out of ignorance. I admit this. Most deer I've taken have been with my .270, my 6mm, and all my other rifles have been at or under 200 yards, many at under 100. If I have never made a shot on something and it's in strange country at long range, I will usually opt for something bigger, as like I said, insurance. And I admit, that's due to my inexperience in hunting in the mountainous North West.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,851 Senior Member
    Ranch13 wrote: »
    Snake, no the elk are not in my back yard. Elk hunting was in the past the family vacation, and winter meat gathering expedition. We packed up camp and groceries and we drove all day to get to the mountains and set up camp.
    What I posted in my first post here was actual experience gained over 50 + years of been there done that. You come along and tell me "well if that's your opinion" No son that's not my opinion, that's the way it happened.
    I've been hunting and saw many a texas license plate in both Wyoming and Colorado, so don't let a 16 hour drive scare you out, a lot of us drive 8 hours to shoot those elk in our" backyard"
    I have an opinion about shooting 300 yds, and from most of what I can tell by reading the internet stories, there's a ton of folks could use a good range finder(most don't realize just how small a game animal looks 1/4 mile off let alone the 1/2mile+ often spoke of), and a chronograph would probably clear up a ton of hype before they even left home. Most elk if truth be told are shot at or close to 200 yds or less.
    Glad them jackrabbits you call deer down there drop at the shot from a 375 ouchnouch because 2 different elk and a couple of antelope I've seen shot with the thing , were dang lucky to be recovered.

    Well, that story about my friend and his .375 H&H is an extreme case just to show that some of us like insurance. But no way in hell I'm shooting a deer OR elk (if I get the opportunity) with a cannon like that. I would feel a bit overgunned with my 300 WBY for most hunting. To tell the truth, I'd probably opt for my 7 mag. A 7 Rem. Mag Or even 7 Wby Mag. is just a .270 or .280 on Steroids. Those rifles give you a little advantage with distance, but in view of my past record on long shots, I can tell you I haven't taken many. Long range shooting, shots past 300-400 yards, in my opinion, is another skill altogether.

    Also, I agree with you 200% about those claimed distances. Depending on the back drop and topography, 100 yards can very easily look to be 200 or more. Of course I've been fooled the opposite way too. But in my experience, it's usually that ranges are overestimated more than under. Usually anyway. I know there are exceptions.

    Also, yeah maybe I sound like an overgunner, but I do it out of ignorance. I admit this. Most deer I've taken have been with my .270, my 6mm, and all my other rifles have been at or under 200 yards, many at under 100. If I have never made a shot on something and it's in strange country at long range, I will usually opt for something bigger, as like I said, insurance. And I admit, that's due to my inexperience in hunting in the mountainous North West.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,851 Senior Member
    Ranch13 wrote: »
    Best I can tell you is if answering a question with real world experience is being an "egostitical prick" then so be it.
    But no matter how you slice/dice it, those 6.5's with their long skinny bullets and moderate velocity just flat get the job done. And they still haven't built the elk, that an ordinary cup and core bullet from a non magnum cartridge, will bounce off of.

    I don't think you're an egotistical prick. But you were a little rough in your reply, LOL! I think you're just a little enthusiastic in your opinion. But that's not a bad thing. You're talking to an ELK ignorant person here and you're trying to show me that I don't need a Howitzer to kill them with, :tooth:
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
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