First crow hunt of the year....

knitepoetknitepoet Senior MemberPosts: 18,869 Senior Member
Got some new memory cards for my "Preymaster" call yesterday. Decided to go harass some crows. camo'd up, grabbed the 1100 and some heavy #6 loads and headed up to where I hunt.

First set.... no crows :tissue: Did call in a HUGE redtail hawk though. It was majestic flying around :up:

change locations...

Second set... first two crows come in, one lights in the top of a pine tree in an overwatch position and the second comes on in.... BOOM, the 1100 speaks once and it folds :up:
"overwatch" bird flies away before I can get a shot :cuss:

Comes back, lights in the same spot.... BOOM, the 1100 speaks once and it folds :up:

Now the last few times I've shot AT crows, I've connected MAYBE 1 out of 10, so after going 2 for 2 I'm feeling GOOD :tooth:

Another pair comes in a few minutes later.... BOOM, first one goes into "crippled" unstable glide mode. BOOM, it keeps gliding, second one hightails it outta there without getting shot at.
So now I'm down to 3 for 4.

Still hearing crows, so I keep the call going. Another pair at high altitude, BOOM, BOOM, both get gone unscathed :cuss:

So I went from 2 for 2 to 3 for 6. Still a LOT better than my average. Also the first time I felt brave enough since the first shoulder surgery back 12/18/12 to shoot anything larger than the braked Grendel.

Got to admit, the shoulder's talking to me now just after those few shots.

Still, it was fun to go mess with the crows. :tooth:



Alec, if you read this, since you're the only person who has seen that area, the first set up was down near the gas well past my two shooting houses
The second set up was at the northern property line on the same side of the road (we rode though that field)

I then went up to that field we went through to get down to the river for a third set. First crow came from an unexpected direction, busted me from well out of range, and flew a few hundred yards further away and kept at it with the "stay away" call, so I didn't get any other birds to come in.
Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


Replies

  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,429 Senior Member
    I like shooting crows, but I bushwhack 'em on the ground with the .22-250. A 400-yard shot gets "interesting"- - - - -closer than that is just too easy. We used to have a good groundhog population to shoot at, but I guess the coyotes are keeping them well under control now. Haven't seen a shootable ghog population in some time except the ones that were undermining my barn, and I think I finally culled all of that bunch out.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,869 Senior Member
    Jerry, I have coyote calls for it as well as a moving "critter" decoy.

    I doubt it would take much convincing to get me to bring it up to your place for a couple of days of "chasing" yodel dogs.

    Might need to invite that TennMike feller too though. Not sure I'd know how to act without the other half of my brain there :tooth:

    edited to add: well, actually one of the other two thirds of my brain, I sort of doubt the third part's up for another 17 hour plane ride just for the possibility to get a chance to bust 'yote :tissue:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,731 Senior Member
    I can visualize the spots.
    When you were shooting at them did you shoulder the gun then try and lead them or did you 'snap' shoot the first 2?

    Crows are very similar to Magpies ( which we shoot over here). Most of the guys I have observed have shouldered the gun and tracked it until they fired. My preferred method ( as with all my shotgunning) is to hold the gun down with the butt level with my waist and follow the bird with my eyes until it is in range. When I decide to shoot, I swing the gun onto the shoulder and fire when my cheek touches the stock. My brain already has all the info regarding speed, flight line etc and I don't even have to think about lead as the brain has already calculated it.

    ......Just interested in your technique.......
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,869 Senior Member
    orchidman wrote: »
    I can visualize the spots.
    When you were shooting at them did you shoulder the gun then try and lead them or did you 'snap' shoot the first 2?
    <snip>

    ......Just interested in your technique.......
    "Snapped" crows 1 & 3. Since #2 was sitting, I "aimed" at him. Also "snapped" the other 2 misses. If you remember that HUGE oak on the northern property line, I was set up ~10-15 yards to the left of it (towards the road) and the last two came over it. They were nearly straight up when I saw them (not a high percentage shot for me on a good day). I also have a sneaking suspicion that those two shots are the ones that made the shoulder "mad" :cuss:

    edited to add: Check my edit on the post above your first one :tooth:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,078 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    I like shooting crows, but I bushwhack 'em on the ground with the .22-250.

    This...I like whacking them when they don't have a clue that you're in the county....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,869 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    I like shooting crows, but I bushwhack 'em on the ground with the .22-250.
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    This...I like whacking them when they don't have a clue that you're in the county....
    Gentlemen, I'm all for that as well (except using a 223)
    Only problem with that currently, is the hay is currently tall enough to obscure the license plate on my Toyota 4wd.

    Once they cut the hay, I'll be taking the 223 and trying for the sitters. Currently they're only visible sitting in trees. I'm not wild about the idea of launching 55gr varmint bullets on that trajectory, so the shotgun'll have to do for now.
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,731 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Jerry, I have coyote calls for it as well as a moving "critter" decoy.

    I doubt it would take much convincing to get me to bring it up to your place for a couple of days of "chasing" yodel dogs.

    Might need to invite that TennMike feller too though. Not sure I'd know how to act without the other half of my brain there :tooth:

    edited to add: well, actually one of the other two thirds of my brain, I sort of doubt the third part's up for another 17 hour plane ride just for the possibility to get a chance to bust 'yote :tissue:

    Actually...................I could be persuaded to head over for something like 'Yote' shooting........I couldn't seem to hit the ones I saw with the rental car when I was over, maybe I would have better luck with a rifle.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,968 Senior Member
    I used to hunt crows a lot, I liked #4 or 5 shot.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,869 Senior Member
    If all else fails Alec, maybe we can talk Jerry into it before next year's shoot :tooth:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,869 Senior Member
    NN wrote: »
    I used to hunt crows a lot, I liked #4 or 5 shot.
    Ned, I bough a case of Fiocchi "Golden Pheasant" #6 @ Cabela's in Sydney NE many years ago when I was driving long haul. I pretty much have ONLY used them for crows and still have a couple of boxes. Since I have them on hand, that's what I use. :beer:
    Plus, I get a little better pattern density with the #6 shot. Back before I got the 1100, I used 3" turkey loads with 1 7/8 to 2oz of #6 shot in my pump. Made some impressively long shots with those loads. Like a couple of times when one was late to the party, and we (me and my late step grand-dad) had already started back to the truck. I'd tell him, "Let's see if I can make him hurry up" and try an insanely long shot and the danged thing would fall out of the sky :yikes:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,429 Senior Member
    A yote hunt sounds like a great idea- - - - -but right now I'm dealing with Mary's medical situation, which isn't improving. I'll keep that idea in mind, though.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,869 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    A yote hunt sounds like a great idea- - - - -but right now I'm dealing with Mary's medical situation, which isn't improving. I'll keep that idea in mind, though.
    Jerry
    Hope she's on the mend SOON :angel:

    And concerning the yodel dogs, still being unemployed, I've got PLENTY of free time, so just whenever it's convenient for you :beer:

    Worst that can happen is I drive up, and the yotes don't cooperate, which means I just get a visit out of the deal. Sounds like a win-win proposition for me :tooth:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,640 Senior Member
    Meanie!

    I like crows/ravens.

    :-)
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,078 Senior Member
    I do too...Crows are notorious nest robbers(hard on our upland bird populations - not to mention song birds) and we've got way too many of them around here....they can use occasional thinning... Never shot a Raven....really bad medicine there....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • justin10mmjustin10mm Senior Member Posts: 688 Senior Member
    For me 7 or 8 crows is a good day but a few years back I stumbled onto the mother load. I had about 3 boxes of shells with me and the crows were still coming into the call after I had run out of shells. I killed over 30 crows that day, all but a couple at a single stand. Here is a picture of the ones I was able to find.

    Scan9.jpg
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,968 Senior Member
    The best I ever did was 33 crows in one hunt, I broke the extractor on the 11-87 during that hunt
    and ended up hunting with a single shot 11-87.

    I had set up on a beach where the crows from miles around were feeding on a big fish kill from pfiesteria
    that had been going on for weeks, many dead menhaden on the beach.

    Anyway, all I had to do was start up the call and I'd get mobbed, the crows were coming in over the decoys
    and dead crows so close that when I shot some, all that was left of some was a wing or a leg.

    Some dead crows were falling in the water and being blown out into the big river in the direction that the
    crows would fly in from their roost, they'd see the dead crows floating and would come in with their blood
    boiling.

    During the melee, a flock of about 5 bald eagles came on scene and snatched a few of the dead crows from
    the river, that really worked up the crows and for a while they showed no caution at all.

    At about crow 28 the extractor broke and then without having but one shot, they soon figured out the deal
    gave up the field or beach or beach as in this case.





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    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,869 Senior Member
    Justin & Ned.... impressive :worthy:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,869 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    Meanie!

    I like crows/ravens.

    :-)
    Well, I like rabbits, but I didn't call YOU names for busting them :p
    :rotflmao:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    I didn't know crows would come in if they saw their dead kin.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,968 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    I didn't know crows would come in if they saw their dead kin.
    They will if there are upright decoys and the correct sounds from a call.

    Hunting pressure can be a factor.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    What natural effect causes this? I'm guessing they mob predators....
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,731 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    What natural effect causes this? I'm guessing they mob predators....
    I think its a combination of them being a very social bird and very inquisitive.

    They act like humans driving past a car crash.......they want to see whats happened........

    Magpies are the same. Stick a couple of magpie decoys in a paddock, play a distress call tape and start shooting. Stick an Owl decoy on a nearby fence post and the birds flying towards the call with go 'feral' at it.

    I was out dealing to some magpies a few years back when I saw a feral cat sneaking through the grass. After dealing to it with the 22, I propped it up next to a dead magpie and staged what looked like a fight between the two. Turned on the distress tape and before I could get under cover I had magpies flying in from all directions and totally ignoring me in their haste to join in...........

    If you use a suppressed .22 you can continue to knock them down without them wising up....................Oh, Wait a minute...............most of you guys don't know the joy of using suppressed .22's...........

    :tooth:
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,857 Senior Member
    I always see (Seems like) hundreds of crows when I'm deer hunting and don't want to shoot at anything but a deer. It's like that with coyotes too. I bet I saw a hundred yotes last deer season when I was in the blind. However, I do believe that if I were to have shot, the crows and/or coyotes would have disbursed quite rapidly and I doubt I would have had many more shots. And these would be rifle shots of 50 to 150 yards. So I would have probably only had a couple of shots at most which would have been iffy.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,869 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    What natural effect causes this? I'm guessing they mob predators....
    Not only do they mob predators, They'll mob a weakened crow. If you look it up, a group of crows is a "murder".
    http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-a-group-of-crows-called
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,869 Senior Member
    orchidman wrote: »
    Oh, Wait a minute...............most of you guys don't know the joy of using suppressed .22's...........

    :tooth:
    :yousuck:
    :roll2:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,429 Senior Member
    Actually , Snake, if I camo up pretty good and don't move around a bunch, busting crows from long distance can be a multi-shot event. If they don't figure out where the shots are coming from, it sort of confuses them. They fly around a little, then land again within range. It helps to have a varmint rig that can whack 'em from 300+ yards.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,857 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Actually , Snake, if I camo up pretty good and don't move around a bunch, busting crows from long distance can be a multi-shot event. If they don't figure out where the shots are coming from, it sort of confuses them.

    I got you there Jerry, good idea. The way my blind (or as it's known on here as a Shooting house) is situtated I don't have a comfortable shot out at 400-500 yards. I don't have a comfortable rest and larger window. But I'm sure I can rearrange things to give me a good shot or two.

    I do have the equipment for such shots. I have the .22-250 Remington with a 6-18 x40 Nikon Buckmaster scope on it. I also have the Stevens 200 in .223 Remington with that same scope. However, the Stevens up to now has an accuracy problem. It won't group consistently under 1.5-2.0 inches. I've tried everything, all weights and style bullets, powders, seating depths, bedded it, worked the trigger over, you name it and it still won't group tight. I'm thinking about having my gun smith chop off a half inch of barrel and re-crown it. I'm at my wit's end with that one.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • BarrydBarryd Member Posts: 188 Member
    Researchers for the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority found over 200 dead
    crows near greater Boston recently, and there was concern that they may
    have died from Avian Flu.

    A Bird Pathologist examined the remains of all
    the dead crows, and, to everyone's relief, confirmed the problem was definitely
    NOT Avian Flu. The cause of death appeared to be vehicular impacts.

    However, during the detailed analysis it was noted that varying colors of
    paints appeared on the bird's beaks and claws. By analyzing these paint
    residues it was determined that 98% of the crows had been killed by
    impacts with trucks, while only 2% were killed by an impact with a car.

    MTA then hired an Ornithological Behaviorist to determine if there was a cause for the
    disproportionate percentages of truck kills versus car kills.

    The Ornithological Behaviorist very quickly concluded the cause: when
    crows eat road kill, they always have a look-out crow in a nearby tree to
    warn of impending danger.

    The conclusion was that while all the lookout crows could say "Cah", none
    could say "Truck."
    Barry
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,106 Senior Member
    Crows are pretty scarce around here. They hang out with the seagulls at the county garbage dumps. They won't allow crow hunting. I can call in a few with my electronic caller, though. Set out a decoy on a post with one on the ground and an owl decoy set up like it's fighting it. They come in quick to that. Get off a few shots and that's the end of it for the day.
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



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