Custom Squirrel Gun

Dr. dbDr. db Senior MemberPosts: 1,541 Senior Member


I hope the pictures came out because the Day of the Jackal movie rifle is as close as I can get to it although the top view from the remake isn't anything like it.

I was selling bibles in Kentucky in 1971 and met a really cool couple. When I came back to deliver the book the man showed me his custom squirrel gun. He also taught me how to judge moonshine for purity. Without sampling.
If I remember correctly, 410 gauge, short octagonal barrel, very minimal single shot action, maybe a metal outline stock.

As good as I can remember quote from the proud owner, "Son, I usually get 4 or 5...the first time out with this I got NINE! NINE! It's just so light I got on them so quick!"

Any one made or even seen anything like it?

Replies

  • Fat BillyFat Billy Senior Member Posts: 1,813 Senior Member
    I thought a squirrel gun was a small hammer less automatic so as not to get caught in squirrels fur on a fast draw. :spittingcoffee: Later,
    Fat Billy

    Recoil is how you know primer ignition is complete.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,957 Senior Member
    I saw quite a few bolt action .22 rifles, both single shot and magazine fed, converted to pistol grip and folding stock configuration back in the 1970s and 1980s. Forearms were bobbed short like the Marlin Papoose. A very few were tube magazine fed. All had barrels shortened to 16 1/4". Never saw a .410 shotgun done like that. A suitable candidate would have been a Stevens Model 56, 58, or 59.

    Way back in the 1960's I saw a few crusty old Mauser 96 and 98 actions converted to single shot .410; they were unsuitable candidates for custom rifles due to some nasty pitting of the actions. There were also quite a few Enfield SMLE actions that were converted to .410 back then, too. I remember seeing ads for them in the outdoor magazines back then. They were dirt cheap, too.
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • horselipshorselips Senior Member Posts: 3,626 Senior Member
    Dr. db wrote: »

    I hope the pictures came out because the Day of the Jackal movie rifle is as close as I can get to it although the top view from the remake isn't anything like it.

    I was selling bibles in Kentucky in 1971 and met a really cool couple. When I came back to deliver the book the man showed me his custom squirrel gun. He also taught me how to judge moonshine for purity. Without sampling.
    If I remember correctly, 410 gauge, short octagonal barrel, very minimal single shot action, maybe a metal outline stock.

    As good as I can remember quote from the proud owner, "Son, I usually get 4 or 5...the first time out with this I got NINE! NINE! It's just so light I got on them so quick!"

    Any one made or even seen anything like it?

    The thought of creating a custom firearm so you could shoot and eat (choke) squirrels ??? Has it come to that? Did I somehow sleep through TEOTWAWKI?
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Squirrel rifle? Notice I said rifle and not "gun"- "This is my Rifle
    This is my Gun
    My Rifle is for Killing
    My Gun is for Fun"! (A GunnySgt politely told me that at PI back in the mid-50's, so it must be true :tooth:)

    Anyhow...my squirrel rifle has a 44 inch barrel, slender tiger striped Maple stock and a sparking rock on the lock. Some of our Members saw it at the Southeastern Shoot this year.
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    Squirrel rifle? Notice I said rifle and not "gun"- "This is my Rifle
    This is my Gun
    My Rifle is for Killing
    My Gun is for Fun"! (A GunnySgt politely told me that at PI back in the mid-50's, so it must be true :tooth:)

    Anyhow...my squirrel rifle has a 44 inch barrel, slender tiger striped Maple stock and a sparking rock on the lock. Some of our Members saw it at the Southeastern Shoot this year.

    When I first saw this thread title I thought it must be you that posted it. It was very kind of you not to slam him for his bad mouthing of squirrel.
    I sure wish you cold figure out that pic posting thing.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • sherwoodsherwood Senior Member Posts: 1,215 Senior Member
    Nice rifle but please tell me how to judge moonshine without tasting it. Thanks.
    I may be old but I ain't dead!
    DPRMD
  • Dr. dbDr. db Senior Member Posts: 1,541 Senior Member
    The reason for using the word "gun" was I wasn't sure but believed that it was a 410 shotGUN. Personally I think that would be too small of a gauge for fun. I think a 4 bore would be minimum. :)
    Moonshine, purity not taste, I couldn't taste since I was selling bibles. Take a teaspoon full. Light it. It should burn to a very small residue. My memory fails me but I believe the flame should be clear? What bothers me is wood alcohol has a lot of the same characteristics.
    Yes the man loved his squirrel and dumplings but I think he also just loved hunting the little limb rats.
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Ah, Dr.d....I should have noticed the .410 but I didn't! But actually, isn't a .410 really a caliber and not a gauge? lets just call it a .410cal smoothbore riflegun! that way we're both correct, and "riflegun" was a common term used in the last quarter of the 1700's, first quarter of the 1800's :tooth: Now on the whiskey....

    A teaspoonful should burn down to maybe 40%-50% of the original volume or close to it. The flame will have a slight blue tenge with a little yellow, maybe, but it can also be almost invisible and still be burning. You can get an idea of proof which dictates taste by quickly spinning a full bottle in a counterclockwise direction with your hand. This will form a funnel-shape with the liquid swirling around the bottle. A bead of air bubbles will form rapidly going around and around, and the smaller the bubbles and the longer the bubbles last the better the quality will be. If after 20 or so seconds the funnel is still identifiable with a few bubbles still swirling around, the proof will probably not exceed 90 or so, and the quality is probably pretty good.....if you can stand white whiskey and I can't! The taste/quality will very rapidly go downhill if the proof exceeds 100 very much. All this stuff you hear about white whiskey being 180+proof and so gooood is a bunch of crap. You can't drink it. it'll burn your mouth and throat too much. Moonshine can be dangerous, of course, like you fear. When it is run through the still the first 8-10 ounces of whiskey that dribbles out of the worm should be thrown away because when the initial evaporation process starts impurities in the form of methanol will be kicked off. And remember.....dishonest moonshiners can always add things to their whiskey that you don't want to know about! Ever hear of "Fats Hardy"? :yikes:
  • olesniperolesniper Senior Member Posts: 3,750 Senior Member
    Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
    I will fear no evil: For I carry a .308 and not a .270
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,832 Senior Member
    Ah, Dr.d....I should have noticed the .410 but I didn't! But actually, isn't a .410 really a caliber and not a gauge? lets just call it a .410cal smoothbore riflegun! that way we're both correct, and "riflegun" was a common term used in the last quarter of the 1700's, first quarter of the 1800's :tooth: Now on the whiskey....

    A teaspoonful should burn down to maybe 40%-50% of the original volume or close to it. The flame will have a slight blue tenge with a little yellow, maybe, but it can also be almost invisible and still be burning. You can get an idea of proof which dictates taste by quickly spinning a full bottle in a counterclockwise direction with your hand. This will form a funnel-shape with the liquid swirling around the bottle. A bead of air bubbles will form rapidly going around and around, and the smaller the bubbles and the longer the bubbles last the better the quality will be. If after 20 or so seconds the funnel is still identifiable with a few bubbles still swirling around, the proof will probably not exceed 90 or so, and the quality is probably pretty good.....if you can stand white whiskey and I can't! The taste/quality will very rapidly go downhill if the proof exceeds 100 very much. All this stuff you hear about white whiskey being 180+proof and so gooood is a bunch of crap. You can't drink it. it'll burn your mouth and throat too much. Moonshine can be dangerous, of course, like you fear. When it is run through the still the first 8-10 ounces of whiskey that dribbles out of the worm should be thrown away because when the initial evaporation process starts impurities in the form of methanol will be kicked off. And remember.....dishonest moonshiners can always add things to their whiskey that you don't want to know about! Ever hear of "Fats Hardy"? :yikes:

    Anybody that don't like Squirrel, biscuits, and Gravy for a Sunday meal is NOT gonna go to heaven! Nope nuno, no way!

    Anyway, yes, .410 is a caliber, hence the . before the number. It's .410 of an inch. However, I have seen it called and written as .410 bore also. Gauge is an old method of naming a bore size by the number of lead balls the size of the bore that it takes to make a pound. Hence, a 12 gauge is bigger than a 20, because it only takes 12 balls of that diameter to make a pound. Where a 16 is also bigger than a 20, but smaller than a 12, for the same reason. back as late as the 30s and 40s there were still guns of 32 gauge and such. I always wanted an 8 gauge. My great great grandfather and his son, my great grandfather used to be market hunters and used punt guns of 2 gauge I was told. They would put out 15-20 of these in a swampy area where the ducks would roost and wait till they were all down for the evening and set off all the punt guns and get 200-300 ducks or so in one shooting. They'd take em home, pluck and gut them and pack them in wooden barrels with salt to ship up to St. Louis. This was how they made their living. Think about that, a 2 ga. had a hell of a diameter. 2 lead balls that size would make a pound.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Come to think of it,"Fats" Hardy and our Board Member "Fat Billy" are or were from the same neighborhood....wonder if there's a relationship :uhm:
  • Dr. dbDr. db Senior Member Posts: 1,541 Senior Member
    Yeah I got messed up because I thought all shotguns would have the same measurement system. I remember now about the (cough choke gasp) Taurus Judge so it had to be a caliber.
    Woods: Thanks for the moonshine refresher. I thought there was a bluish tinge but couldn't be sure after 40+ years. Loved the info about the swirl. Moonshine, or white corn licker (no Slanty don't go there), is supposedly going mainstream legal so some (except for Orchid who will still be singing any port in a storm) may need the info for future research.
    So Snake a 2 bore duck gun is for fun? That description would seem to convey all the essential information.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,143 Senior Member
    You can find 8-gauge guns fairly easily, but you can't hunt with them. A 10 is as big as it gets for migratory birds.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
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