Home Main Category Hunting

Hunters trade shots over deer breeding, killing methods

Big ChiefBig Chief Senior MemberPosts: 32,995 Senior Member
It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!

Replies

  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Good grief- - - -what a grotesque abomination! About the "hunting" methods- - - -why not just keep the thing in a barn stall and let the so-called hunter go at it with an axe?
    :down:
    Jerry
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,070 Senior Member
    IMO, those two method should rightfully be called "hunting" and "killing".

    Sort of reminds me of Linefinder's bison. He was honest about it and described it, not as going bison hunting, but going to "shoot" a bison.

    To me, if it's guaranteed success, it AIN'T hunting :nono:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • AdrianAdrian Member Posts: 65 Member
    Agree...some of what passes for hunting is about as challenging as shooting your pet cat.
  • QuinianQuinian Senior Member Posts: 707 Senior Member
    Yeeeeah that's not hunting to me. My success rate is roughly 1 deer down for every 20-30 trips into the woods. That's how I like my hunting. Yeah sometimes it can get annoying if you're just looking to get some meat but over all that's how I prefer it
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,026 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »

    Sort of reminds me of Linefinder's bison. He was honest about it and described it, not as going bison hunting, but going to "shoot" a bison.

    Yeah, that was a pretty sad affair. And I did it again the next year, simply because that's the only way to get bison meat at a "fairly reasonable" price (a relative thing, if there ever was one, I tell ya).

    I won't be doing it again.

    If you shoot for blood long enough, there's invariably going to be a shot or three you wish you could call back. Since the end result of the bison shoot was exactly what I was after, I can't place them in that category, but they're pretty darned close.

    Mike

    Oh...in case you're wondering. If you eat two bison in two years, your taste for bison meat will probably decrease substantially. Personally, I'd rather eat my rubber soled Danner's than another bison steak.
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    There's really nothing new about this, at least to some degree. Back in the early '60s when I was in forest/wildlife management school at the UGA, we had a wildlife prof-Dr. Ernie Provost-who forecast this happening by the time we as undergraduates were winding down our careers in the woods. Dr. "Ernie" taught us methods of increasing antler size-mass (primarily mass) through genetics and food quality. To me, though, a system such as this one described is a form of prostitution which preys on human stupidity. But after all, who am I to even comment? Remember, I'm the fellow who urges the use of flintlocks for hunting all game animals :jester:
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,070 Senior Member
    Linefinder wrote: »
    Yeah, that was a pretty sad affair. And I did it again the next year, simply because that's the only way to get bison meat at a "fairly reasonable" price (a relative thing, if there ever was one, I tell ya).

    I won't be doing it again.

    If you shoot for blood long enough, there's invariably going to be a shot or three you wish you could call back. Since the end result of the bison shoot was exactly what I was after, I can't place them in that category, but they're pretty darned close.

    Mike

    Oh...in case you're wondering. If you eat two bison in two years, your taste for bison meat will probably decrease substantially. Personally, I'd rather eat my rubber soled Danner's than another bison steak.
    Mike, don't get me wrong, I'm not slighting you in the least.
    Hell, given the chance I'd kill a bison that way for the meat myself. Just comparing going out (in the woods around here) HUNTING, and going somewhere to SHOOT an animal.

    edited to add: Or shooting one of the deer in my back yard. Yeah, me or the wife normally take one from the back deck every season, we don't call it "hunting". We normally refer to it as what we feel it is, we tell folks, "We killed one in our back yard"
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,128 Senior Member
    It is what it is. I don't really don't have a problem with it, just don't call it something that it isn't. A farmer has every right to raise livestock on his land. The livestock needs to be harvested/slaughtered one way or another and that is cool as long as it is dispatched humanely. I used to feel that it was unethical until I thought about it in these terms.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,156 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    It is what it is. I don't really don't have a problem with it, just don't call it something that it isn't. A farmer has every right to raise livestock on his land. The livestock needs to be harvested/slaughtered one way or another and that is cool as long as it is dispatched humanely. I used to feel that it was unethical until I thought about it in these terms.


    Correct

    When the Dr./ CEO/ Random Rich Guy hangs the antlers on the wall and regales his guests with the story of how he harvested it. You know......

    "I go out with my trusty 12-gauge double-barrel, crawl around on my stomach.

    I track and move and decoy and play games and try to outsmart them.

    You know, you kind of play the wind.

    Then........ it becomes unethical.
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,026 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Mike, don't get me wrong, I'm not slighting you in the least.

    Oh, I didn't take it as a slight at all, Paul. In fact, I thought it very gracious of you to point out that I'd never called it a "hunt" at all.

    And while I'll certainly agree that harvesting an animal by the method I took these two bison is ethically no different than slaughtering a steer on a ranch, still......were it not for the meat that went in the freezer, I'd happily call those shots back. It was just.....well....sad. And I'm not an overly sentimental guy.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,070 Senior Member
    :beer:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 2,035 Senior Member
    Heck, I watched a hunting? show on the outdoor channel a year or two ago, where the "Trophy" hunter was stalking (walking bolt upright) through the trees and lining up a shot on a HUGE bull elk. I thought it odd that the elk just got up and stood like it's feet were glued to the ground. The guy took forever to shoot, then the elk turned it's head, and I saw the yellow ear tag. It was in Canada on an Elk Farm. I'm sure this guy fabricated some story of getting it in some hell-hole...to impress anyone who'd listen. What a joke!
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement