How to remove a stuck case in a resizing die?

BigDanSBigDanS Senior MemberPosts: 6,803 Senior Member
It was brass prep night. I got through resizing about 90 30-06 brass when on the upstroke the brass tore in the shell holder and I have a Remington case stuck in the Lyman die. I took the top off and tried to tap rod trough the bottom, but I only succeeded in bending the decapping rod that holds the decapping pin and neck resizing button. I suspect I need to buy another die.

Luckily I have 100 prepped brass, but what can I do to get the brass out of the die? I obviously need a new decapping rod.

On a better note, I am going to the range tomorrow to test my 30-06 loads:

Sierra 165gr hpbt over 55, 56, and 57gr of h4350
Sierra 180gr sbt over 55, 56, 57, and 57.5gr (max) h4350

Hopefully we get a winner.

D
"A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
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Replies

  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member Posts: 1,483 Senior Member
    I've stuck roughly 3.2 million brass in my dies of many calibers. I have an RCBS kit in which you tap the primer pocket and pull it out. Works pretty well.

    The most successful technic I've used is to mail it to the manufacturer and they either pull or send you a new one. Last straw anyway.

    Good Luck
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,617 Senior Member
    I'm no help on the stuck case. But a work in the powder charge.

    I usually only drop 1 grain to 1.5 grains below Max. Anything less seems counter productive to me. I've also usually found that my most accurate load is most often within 1 grain of Max.

    Another thought, I don't like skipping whole grains as 55, 56, 57, etc. I've actually seen a round shoot 1 1/2" groups with (example) 56gr...........then shoot 1/4" groups with 56.5gr............and jump back to 1 1/2" groups with 57gr. In such a way as you are loading, you might miss the accurate load.

    If book Max is 57.5 grains. I usually load 56gr, 56.5gr, 57gr, 57.5gr, 58gr. And might not even use the 56gr load.

    Once I find the accurate load out of those, I usually load more of the accurate load to confirm. Then tweak up and down .2gr if you so feel the need.

    Just what has worked for me. Bullets and powder ain't cheap. I try to use as few as possible in load development. So far, I've been fortunate to find what in after with this method. If I have to tweak more than that, the bullet isn't worth my time. I'll move to something else.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,220 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    Another thought, I don't like skipping whole grains as 55, 56, 57, etc. I've actually seen a round shoot 1 1/2" groups with (example) 56gr...........then shoot 1/4" groups with 56.5gr............and jump back to 1 1/2" groups with 57gr. In such a way as you are loading, you might miss the accurate load.

    If book Max is 57.5 grains. I usually load 56gr, 56.5gr, 57gr, 57.5gr, 58gr. And might not even use the 56gr load.

    Once I find the accurate load out of those, I usually load more of the accurate load to confirm. Then tweak up and down .2gr if you so feel the need.
    I usually start in the middle and work up at 1/2 grains from there. But I use the same system that Zee does. After I get the best load of the bunch, it is well worth it to play with seating depth on a bolt action. I got 1 case stuck that I couldn't get out. I destroyed the die and still couldn't get it out. I am a carpenter, not a machinist. I beat on crap with hammers. If that don't work, I strap a chain around it and pull on it with my truck. If that don't work, I get the skid steer. If that don't work, it is a piece of crap and is destined for the scrap pile.
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    Have you tried heating up the die with a propane torch then dribbling in some penetrating oil and pushing/tapping the case out?
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • ojrojr Senior Member Posts: 844 Senior Member
    I've had a few stuck , I have the same solution as BellCat, stuck case kit, taps it and you can pull it out, has worked everytime for me
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,422 Senior Member
    Send me the die before you mess with it much more. I've got the regular stuck case remover kit, but I've had better luck drilling and tapping the case with a 5/16-24 thread and using an Allen bolt, a flat washer, and a 1/2" socket to pull the case. you'll need to remove the decapper stem first, which can be a bit of a challenge if it's bent already.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,508 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    I'm no help on the stuck case. But a work in the powder charge.

    I usually only drop 1 grain to 1.5 grains below Max. Anything less seems counter productive to me. I've also usually found that my most accurate load is most often within 1 grain of Max.

    Another thought, I don't like skipping whole grains as 55, 56, 57, etc. I've actually seen a round shoot 1 1/2" groups with (example) 56gr...........then shoot 1/4" groups with 56.5gr............and jump back to 1 1/2" groups with 57gr. In such a way as you are loading, you might miss the accurate load.

    If book Max is 57.5 grains. I usually load 56gr, 56.5gr, 57gr, 57.5gr, 58gr. And might not even use the 56gr load.

    Once I find the accurate load out of those, I usually load more of the accurate load to confirm. Then tweak up and down .2gr if you so feel the need.

    Just what has worked for me. Bullets and powder ain't cheap. I try to use as few as possible in load development. So far, I've been fortunate to find what in after with this method. If I have to tweak more than that, the bullet isn't worth my time. I'll move to something else.

    This.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Stuck cases happen to the best /worst of us. It's about the most aggravating thing that can happen in the entire reloading process.

    I ruined/banged up pretty bad a .30 Carbine die trying to get a stuck case out and ordered a new one. Even though they appear straight-walled, they are not and have a slight taper. I was using One-Shot spray lube and missed one.
    It was really stuck tighter than Dick's Hat Band and then some.

    Be patient and do what others suggessted. I've gotten some out with tapping from the top or using small Vise-Grips on the bottom turning the brass back and forth with oil eventually working it loose.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,508 Senior Member
    Dan, I'm wondering, what lube are you using?
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,849 Senior Member
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    jbohio wrote: »
    Dan, I'm wondering, what lube are you using?

    I quit using One-Shot spray lube after that and I used up the can. Hornady Unique/Lee Liquid Alox or lately some Imperial. I know a little goes a long way way and i can feel the slippery on my fingers.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 2,025 Senior Member
    Kinda makes you wonder why they don't offer carbide dies in 2 die sets for rifles. I use a small drill bit and an OLD tiny autobody slide hammer that uses a self-tapping screw in the tip. Works for me.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Kinda makes you wonder why they don't offer carbide dies in 2 die sets for rifles. I use a small drill bit and an OLD tiny autobody slide hammer that uses a self-tapping screw in the tip. Works for me.

    They mostly are ALL carbide anymore. Carbide dies will not keep your bottle-necked/tapered rifle cases from getting stuck, you still need to lube the brass.

    OTOH straight walled pistol cases need no lube when using carbide dies.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Translation: quit ing with it. You'll only make it worse.
    :jester:

    Them is words of wisdom right yonder.................:conehead: :tooth:
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • shootershooter Senior Member Posts: 1,186 Senior Member
    This is what I got back in the early 80's and have used it three times since. Once for my mistake,, and twice for friends who showed up with a die in hand and a frown on
    their face.
    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/504741/rcbs-stuck-case-remover?cm_vc=subv1131002
    There's no such thing as having too much ammo, unless you're on fire or trying to swim!
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,849 Senior Member
    Kinda makes you wonder why they don't offer carbide dies in 2 die sets for rifles.
    The same reason your "carbide sizing die" for "straight" cases only has a ring in it, Cabide's so hard it's a mother to machine, and they couldn't make an entire die for a bottle necked case out of it
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,508 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    He was using imperial. He was using enough to dent the cases. Now I think he has went the other way. :tooth:

    That's what I thought.

    When I first started, I stuck one on the up stroke.
    I had the expander ball way too high, and the case mouth was pinched between the ball and the die.
  • shootershooter Senior Member Posts: 1,186 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    The same reason your "carbide sizing die" for "straight" cases only has a ring in it, Cabide's so hard it's a mother to machine, and they couldn't make an entire die for a bottle necked case out of it

    That's exactly what I thought until they started offering them for rifle calibers. Has anybody got experience with these?
    I'd like to look at one of these carbide sizing dies for .223 and see how it's made. ???
    http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=carbide+sizing+die+223&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
    There's no such thing as having too much ammo, unless you're on fire or trying to swim!
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 18,849 Senior Member
    OKay, so instead of "couldn't" I guess the more accurate statement would have been "It would be terribly difficult (and pricey) to make a carbide bottle neck sizing die"

    edited to add: I do find the carbide sizing buttons to be a worthwhile upgrade. I see other folks offer then now as well, AFAIK Redding was the first company to offer them. Which is why I've bought quite a few Redding neck sizing dies over the years
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,508 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    OKay, so instead of "couldn't" I guess the more accurate statement would have been "It would be terribly difficult (and pricey) to make a carbide bottle neck sizing die"

    edited to add: I do find the carbide sizing buttons to be a worthwhile upgrade. I see other folks offer then now as well, AFAIK Redding was the first company to offer them. Which is why I've bought quite a few Redding neck sizing dies over the years
    And it says you still have to lube the cases, so, doesn't seem to be much of a benefit to me.
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,661 Senior Member
    jbohio wrote: »
    And it says you still have to lube the cases, so, doesn't seem to be much of a benefit to me.

    The only carbide die I have that says lube the case is my S&W .500 die.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,803 Senior Member
    I was using Imperial and sometimes dry case lube on the neck.

    I think I will try the tap and screw removal. It's a $25 die, I can spend a ton of time on it or get another and have a spare. Plus I still need a new decap and sizing ball rod.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,052 Senior Member
    It may be just me, but I always had problems with Lyman dies. Same as you, stuck cases and broken de-capping rods/pins. Now I use mostly Lee and RCBS. Have had a few stuck cases with the RCBS and no problems at all with any of the Lee die sets I have. I also put some lube on the expanding ball if I feel it start to stick. Dry lube inside the case neck helps, too.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,101 Senior Member
    I stuck a case in my Lyman die and broke the decapping pin and bent the rod. Stuck a case in my RCBS die and just broke the decapping pin, rod stayed straight.

    I think the bent rod is more due to having a much thinner rod on the Lyman die than on the RCBS. Both were caused by a lack of lube and both were solved using a stuck case remover.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,106 Senior Member
    I've stuck a few cases in dies over the years. Jerry's method of using the bigger 5/16-24 die is a good one. I've gone to that size since he first posted about it. The bigger screw has much more pulling force. Less chance of the screw stripping the threads.
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,508 Senior Member
    Buford wrote: »
    The only carbide die I have that says lube the case is my S&W .500 die.

    Do you have Dillon full length rifle carbide dies?
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,422 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    Less chance of the screw stripping the threads.

    Mike, the other part of the trick is to use a nut and washer on the bolt that's screwed into the threaded case. That way the turning effort is on the bolt's steel threads, and the brass only has a straight-out pull on it. A 5/16" bolt about 2" long has plenty of thread for the nut and washer to fit behind a spacer, and a 3/8" drive 1/2" or 9/16" socket is just about the right size to fit over the head of the stuck case.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,106 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Mike, the other part of the trick is to use a nut and washer on the bolt that's screwed into the threaded case. That way the turning effort is on the bolt's steel threads, and the brass only has a straight-out pull on it. A 5/16" bolt about 2" long has plenty of thread for the nut and washer to fit behind a spacer, and a 3/8" drive 1/2" or 9/16" socket is just about the right size to fit over the head of the stuck case.
    Jerry

    Never had one stuck that tight...............yet. If a case starts feeling wrong during sizing, I stop and back it out first, if I can. One of those, 'if it feels wrong then it probably is' things you learn. Sometimes a case will go in with no problems and get stuck, though. I like your method you described. Next time I get one stuck in the die, I'll try that.
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,661 Senior Member
    jbohio wrote: »
    Do you have Dillon full length rifle carbide dies?

    No, I run RCBS dies.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,508 Senior Member
    Buford wrote: »
    No, I run RCBS dies.
    That's what I thought.
    You took me out of context, we were talking about this
    shooter wrote: »
    That's exactly what I thought until they started offering them for rifle calibers. Has anybody got experience with these?
    I'd like to look at one of these carbide sizing dies for .223 and see how it's made. ???
    http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=carbide+sizing+die+223&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
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