I suck!

twatwa Senior MemberPosts: 2,231 Senior Member
I have come to the conclusion that no-one in the world is worse shot with a bow than I. Shot over a doe this morning at 30 yards, then this evening in a different stand, I shot over another doe at about 30 yards.(I wasn't to upset, just does after all) - but - A dandy 8pt. came in after the miss this evening and was sniffing my arrow I had launched at the doe about 20 minutes earlier, I figure no way I am shooting over this guy. I SHOT UNDER HIM!
Anyone want to buy some bow gear? :tissue:

Replies

  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 4,571 Senior Member
    Do you practice with 3D targets? it really helps.
    The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me.

    Ayn Rand
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 9,459 Senior Member
    What are you shooting? Do you have your yardages marked?

    If you use a tree stand, you need to practice from a tree stand.
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,741 Senior Member
    All I can say is if you truly are #1 I am a very close 2nd..
    Man do I have stories of some epic misses.
    One at a drop tine buck quite a rarity up here.

    Ever have a doe in estrous running figure 8's around you to shake the bucks off ?:tooth:
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,702 Senior Member
    That's why they call it 'hunting' and not 'killing'...............

    The up side is that you spent time in the woods, got to see some animals, confirmed that you were in the right place at the right times, found out that your camo etc was working..............along with a whole bunch of other stuff.

    I am sure you will score next time.....and I will say a prayer to the hunting Gods for you.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • HondoHondo Member Posts: 320 Member
    Same thing happened to several(most) in my camp this year........and last year.......and the year before........
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,243 Senior Member
    Practice shooting from your stand. It's different than shooting from the same ground the deer is standing on.
  • mosseybuckmosseybuck Member Posts: 455 Member
    Sounds familiar, many years ago while hunting with a Ben Pearson recurve bow, I shot one under a doe in Pa. and one shot under a doe in Tennessee! Those were the last shots I've made with a stick and string rig.
    USMC '59-'65, NRA Lifer, Tennessee Squire
  • RazorbackerRazorbacker Senior Member Posts: 4,646 Senior Member
    Anyone who calls himself a bow hunter and has never missed, just hasn't bow hunted very much. it happens. It builds character. What could have been much worse is to stick one and then can't find it. I'll take a clean miss any day.

    I've been known to pace off distances around my stand and hang surveyor's tape so there's no guess work on distance. I agree with the others suggesting you practice from a stand.

    i came to the conclusion years ago that in bow shooting a consistent release is all. All things being equal that is.
    i have this thing i do once I decide I'm going to try for a shot. I start chanting in my head, "Smooth draw, smooth draw, smooth draw." Then as i settle the site pin, "Pick out a hair, pick out a hair, pick out a hair." that way you don't shoot at the whole deer or even a general area. The bull on my target is about 2". Then, "Release, release, release." This helps me to make sure I'm anchored and squeeze the release trigger. Oh, and if it's a shooter buck, never look at his horns again til he's down. It's a distraction.

    Finally, and no offense but I must say I don't like the "just Does" comment. I like to shoot big bucks as much as anyone you'll ever meet. But they're all magnificent creatures. If when you're out in the woods hunting and you see a deer, any deer and you don't get all excited. And if when you take a deer, any deer you aren't excited and happy then perhaps you should think about why you really hunt. If it's just bragging rights over the size of his rack then i think you're in the wrong business.

    Again no offense, just the way I look at it.
    Teach your children to love guns, they'll never be able to afford drugs
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,544 Senior Member
    jbp-ohio wrote: »

    If you use a tree stand, you need to practice from a tree stand.


    I learned this the hard way a couple of seasons ago. I had practiced pretty heavily almost every day before the season and could keep my shots within 3" at 50yds and felt so confident that I figure anything that was within sight of the stand I was bowhunting from would be an easy shot. One morning I had a pig of about 70lbs walk past my stand close enough to spit on and I was 18' up and was already tasting thick cut pork chops. My bolt passed over him and stuck in the ground next to him! When I squeezed the trigger everything felt perfect and I thought it was a done deal. I didn't consider the trajectory changing so much at that steep angle.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • twatwa Senior Member Posts: 2,231 Senior Member
    Anyone who calls himself a bow hunter and has never missed, just hasn't bow hunted very much. it happens. It builds character. What could have been much worse is to stick one and then can't find it. I'll take a clean miss any day.

    I've been known to pace off distances around my stand and hang surveyor's tape so there's no guess work on distance. I agree with the others suggesting you practice from a stand.

    i came to the conclusion years ago that in bow shooting a consistent release is all. All things being equal that is.
    i have this thing i do once I decide I'm going to try for a shot. I start chanting in my head, "Smooth draw, smooth draw, smooth draw." Then as i settle the site pin, "Pick out a hair, pick out a hair, pick out a hair." that way you don't shoot at the whole deer or even a general area. The bull on my target is about 2". Then, "Release, release, release." This helps me to make sure I'm anchored and squeeze the release trigger. Oh, and if it's a shooter buck, never look at his horns again til he's down. It's a distraction.

    Finally, and no offense but I must say I don't like the "just Does" comment. I like to shoot big bucks as much as anyone you'll ever meet. But they're all magnificent creatures. If when you're out in the woods hunting and you see a deer, any deer and you don't get all excited. And if when you take a deer, any deer you aren't excited and happy then perhaps you should think about why you really hunt. If it's just bragging rights over the size of his rack then i think you're in the wrong business.

    Again no offense, just the way I look at it.

    In no way was I trying to demean the deer by saying "just a doe" - I posted a kill of a young doe earlier this year and quoted "Thanks Jermanator - still get the "RUSH" even with the little ones. When that's gone, I will hang my bow for good, but I don't ever see that happening. I have found the only thing better is watching your kids get the same feeling. "
    Taking a doe versus a mature buck is a whole different dog where I hunt, a mature buck didn't get big because he makes mistakes. Misses on a mature buck versus a doe, just hurts a little more, that is all I was trying to get across.
    I checked my sights, and all seems good - I think I just had one of those days - BUCK FEVER (OR DOE FEVER!) I just pulled the shots I believe.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,226 Senior Member
    Very important questions regarding factors that bit me early on in my bowshooting/bowhunting life: 1) is the bow properly tuned and timed and 2) if you are suing conventional (aka fixed-blade) broadheads, have you practiced with your actual broadheads on a target? Even the best-tuned bow can show some variance in how a broadhead will shoot versus a practice/field point. A poorly-tuned bow or badly timed one can show HUGE differences in how the fixed-blade broadheads shoot versus the field points. I have seen variences of nearly 12" at 20 yards between field points and broadheads using the same exact bow in a bow that had not been properly tuned.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
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