Hat Trick on Hogs - .30cal 125gr Hornady SST Field Report

ZeeZee Senior MemberPosts: 20,564 Senior Member
Went after Hogs with the .308 Short Monday night.

308Shortcompleted30.jpg

Taking full advantage of the full moon, I got on location to the agricultural fields about 9:00 that night. Initial fears of clouds turned out to not be much of an issue. There were plenty of breaks in the clouds that provided almost daylight conditions. So, I parked the truck, gathered my gear, and started walking. The hogs are hunted heavy here as the owner has a serious problem and they destroy a large amount of his crop. But, they are usually hunted at night by hunters driving around with spotlight. Because of this, the hogs bail at the first notion of a vehicle. Decided to pull one over on them by walking without light.

Eventually, I saw a large boar off in the distance. In the process of stalking closer, another boar crossed the fence and entered the field in front of me. I knelt down, placed the rifle on the Bog Pod shooting tripod I had with me, located the boar, and started tracking as he walked. Now, there had been some discussion on this forum as to whether the 125gr SST would be too fragile for deer sized game. So, as I aimed at the boar, I have to admit that this concern was in my mind. Because of this, I decided to stay away from the shoulder and the boar's shield. Holding back of the shoulder, I sent the bullet on its way at about 50 yards. On impact, the boar let out a quick "ROINK" and rolled over with his legs kicking in the air. After a few seconds, it was over. I walked up to a stone dead boar of about 150 pounds.

Upon inspection, there was no exit wound.

We will call him..........Pig 1.

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I left him by the road and walked back to the truck. Since everything in this field was on to me now, I loaded up and drove to another field a couple miles away. Walking around there ended without sightings. The farmer had recently harvested several of his crops and the hogs had been foraging on the fresh cut produce. Unfortunately, by the time I'd gotten there, the farmer had already plowed the majority of the fields for his next crop. Not much more than dirt in the fields at this point. So, I went back to the original field to see if things had calmed down.

Back at the start, I took pics of Pig 1 and loaded him in the truck. Then, started walking again. Off in the distance, I see a big boar come out of the remaining corn and and start feeding in the harvested melons. The stalk began. I initially ranged him at 450 yards and knew I needed to get closer as the bullet drops below 1,800 fps in this 16" barrel just past 400 yards. So, the cat and mouse began. I couldn't stalk perpendicular to the harvested rows as the remaining crop was too noisy. What I did was move up and down the road until I was even with the boar and then walk down the crop row to close the distance. Problem was, the hog kept changing directions. I'd get going down a row and the boar would feed off the other way. I'd have to return to the road and get even with him again to start down the crop row. Just to have him head off in another direction. Back and forth we went until I finally got a bead on the direction he wanted to go. Moving off down the row to intercept him..........I laid down and let him approach.

At approximately 150 yards, he turned broadside. Knowing that this was a larger boar than the first and that he'd have a thicker shield, I still held back of the shoulder. I fired and heard the impact. The boar sat on his haunches and squealed, then took off in a dead run doing acrobats as he went. He'd run and leap in the air, then spin around and take off again. Leap, spin, run over and over for about 50 yards until on one of his spins..........he fell over dead.

Walking up to him, I realized he was a pretty good size hog. I also realized there was an entrance AND exit wound. We will call him, Pig 2 and estimate his weight at around 250 pounds.

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(The blood you see is from the exit wound. Entrance was on the other side closer to the shoulder.)

Took some pics, loaded him in the truck next to Pig 1, and went to another field.

Walking through this other field, I could see a large band of hogs off in the distance. As I got closer, I could tell there was another large boar in the group. But, I wanted something more eddible this time. There was a large sow with little pigglets and two medium sows with older pigglets. Unfortunately for one of the medium sows, she was multi-colored and stood out really well in the moonlight. Target acquired!

At approximately 175 yards, she turned broadside. Now, knowing that the second bullet had exited the large boar at 150 yards and knowing that the sow was both further and lacking a thick shield.............I held tight to the shoulder and fired.

She hit the after burners! Running straight away like a rocket losing altitude, I saw her getting lower and lower to the ground until..........POOF!!!!!...........in a cloud of dust she nose dived into the dirt and rolled to a stop.

For a few seconds, the rest of the heard paused and for an instance I considered shooting another. Well, I usually say that indicision kills. Not this time. The brief waivering in my mind to shoot or not shoot resulted in little black dots and big black dots scattering everywhere across the field. No big deal. I had my work cut out for me anyway.

Retrieved the truck and drove up to the sow. Took some pics and loaded Pig 3 (about 125 pounds) in the truck. You will notice the exit would in this picture as well. Interestingly enough, I shot all the pigs on their left side that night.

CopyofDSC_0041.jpg

It was 1:30 in the morning and time to head home. I had work to do.

Autopsy photos next. There will be blood!
"To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
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Replies

  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,978 Senior Member
    Most excellent!
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,053 Senior Member
    So did the first one have a house made of straw, the second of wood, and the third of brick?
  • timctimc Senior Member Posts: 6,583 Senior Member
    Nice shooting and good looking porkers.

    I never doubted the 125 grain SST's I use the 129 grain SST's in my Grendel with very good results on pigs. I have been very happy with them, when I had trouble was when I dropped to the 55 grain Vmax and loaded them into my 22-250, I had 3 different pigs with head shots at ranges from 100 to 200 yards that when hit would roll about 3 times then get up and run like there was nothing wrong with them.

    This is an exit wound on a pig shot just behind the ear at about 100 yards with the 6.5 Grendel and 129 grain SST. The hole measured about 1/2" and the pig was DRT.
    PigJanuary21exitwound.jpg
    timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
    AKA: Former Founding Member
  • Dr. dbDr. db Senior Member Posts: 1,541 Senior Member
    Brilliant strategy and tactics! Do you need recipes? Pork tamales? Pork green chili? Prosciutto? Sourwood honey glazed ham? Pulled pork? Ham hocks and collards? Pork and beans? Ribs? Smoked pork loin? Pork breakfast sausage? Chorizo? Soused hog face?I'm offering my services as taster.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 8,528 Senior Member
    That is one OUTSTANDING report zee.
    I am reading this from work so am unable to see pictures but will be checking when I get home.
    Thanx for sharing your experience.
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    At home, I butchered the sow first as she was the one I was going to eat. So, autopsy photos will be in reverse order.

    Pig 3

    Empact Location
    DSC_0047.jpg

    Entrance Wound
    DSC_0049.jpg

    Entrance Wound w/out Shoulder
    DSC_0051.jpg

    Broke 2 Ribs on Entrance
    DSC_0052.jpg

    Entrance into Chest Cavity. (Notice broken ribs and congealed blood over the lungs.)
    DSC_0059.jpg
    DSC_0060.jpg

    Bone Fragments and Bullet Path
    DSC_0061.jpg

    Congealed Blood Removed and Wound in Lungs (Notice secondary wounds caused by bone fragments.)
    DSC_0064.jpg

    Bullet Exit from Lungs
    DSC_0065.jpg

    Bullet Exit from Chect Cavity (Broke 1 rib.)
    DSC_0067.jpg

    Bullet Exit Under Shoulder
    DSC_0057.jpg

    Bullet Exit Through Shoulder
    DSC_0053.jpg
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    So did the first one have a house made of straw, the second of wood, and the third of brick?

    Other way around, as you will see in the autopsy.

    :popcorn:
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Big Boy was next.

    Pig 2

    Impact
    DSC_0070.jpg

    Shield Thickness at Entrance Location
    DSC_0072.jpg

    Entrance Wound
    DSC_0073.jpg

    Entrance Under Shoulder
    DSC_0078.jpg

    Two Broken Ribs and Entrance to Lungs
    DSC_0080.jpg

    Permanent Cavity to On-Side Lung
    DSC_0089.jpg

    Entrance to On-Side and Off-Side Lung
    DSC_0090.jpg

    Entrance to Off-Side Lung and Bruising from Temporary Cavity Expansion
    DSC_0091.jpg

    Exit from Off-Side Lung and Temporary Cavity Bruising to Both Lungs
    DSC_0092.jpg

    Entrance to Abdominal Cavity w/ Protruding Intestines
    DSC_0093.jpg

    Damage to Liver
    DSC_0096.jpg

    Exit Wound
    DSC_0074.jpg
    DSC_0076.jpg
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    OK, by the time I got to the first pig.........he was bloated like a balloon and stunk......well.........like a pig. Stuff was bubbling out of him in a gaseous manner............so..........I wasn't about to open him up. Besides, It was 5:00 in the morning and I'd already been up sice 7:00 the previous morning. In light of that.........Pig 1 got the abridged version.

    Impact Location
    DSC_0098.jpg

    Bullet Lodged Under Skin on Off-Side
    DSC_0099.jpg

    DSC_0101.jpg

    DSC_0102.jpg

    The bullet retained 68.6 grains upon recovery.

    IMG_3125.jpg

    IMG_3126.jpg
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Impact Velocities

    Pig 1 - 2,750 fps

    Pig 2 - 2,488 fps

    Pig 3 - 2,425 fps

    (approximate)
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,788 Senior Member
    nice work!

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,702 Senior Member
    You cant argue with the performance of the projectile. It did everything that was required and then some!

    Good score.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,552 Senior Member
    That's a heck of a report on a well executed hunt. I'm happy to get some real-life info on the light .30 calibers. :up:

    One question: How did you load the big hog in the truck?
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 6,978 Senior Member
    As always great pics and descriptions:up:
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    One question: How did you load the big hog in the truck?

    With THIS little Gem.

    IMG_3130.jpg

    Had a hunter give this to me years ago when I used to manage and guide on a ranch. This simple little tool is a life (back) saver. Works on deer and hogs and is great for dragging short distances. Loop it over horns or around necks and twist to tighten.

    To load the pigs, I loop it over their heads and around their neck up next to their jaw and ears. Twist the handle to tighten and climb up on the tailgate of my truck. I have to lift a little to get their head and shoulders off the ground, but I'm then able to get in a squatting position and lift with my legs. Once the head and shoulders are above the tailgate, I just walk backwards and drag them into the truck.

    The big boar wasn't easy by any means..........but it was easier than just trying to muscle him in there from the ground. Probably saved my back as well.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 3,321 Senior Member
    Awesome writeup. Great information. Thanks for sharing. :beer:
  • EliEli Senior Member Posts: 3,074 Senior Member
    Awesome.


    But dude.......LATEX GLOVES!
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Here is an interesting question to ponder.

    On both Pig 2 & Pig 3 there were TWO (2) ribs broken on entrance. BOTH pigs were broadside at the shot. There is a span of at least 1" or maybe more between each rib.

    So, how did two ribs end up getting broken? The bullet wasn't wide enough to impact both ribs.

    All I can think of is that the trauma caused on impact (blunt force?) fractured both ribs. Any other ideas?

    Pig 3
    DSC_0052.jpg

    Pig 2
    DSC_0060.jpg
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Eli wrote: »
    Awesome.


    But dude.......LATEX GLOVES!

    Meh. What's a little blood?
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,243 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    Meh. What's a little trichinosis?

    FIFY.

    Thanks for this. This goes right along with my thread a couple days ago, about poly-tipped bullets. Looks like SSTs would work fine.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    FIFY.

    Thanks for this. This goes right along with my thread a couple days ago, about poly-tipped bullets. Looks like SSTs would work fine.

    I can't SPELL that! Let alone CATCH it!!!

    :tooth:

    And yes, Hornady SST bullets should do you well.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,243 Senior Member
    Wasn't there some issue long ago with Nosler's initial poly-tipped bullets blowing up on impact? I think that may be what had me boogered about them. Plus that one deer I saw with the "burn wound" with no penetration.

    If they'll do that to a hog... My poodle sized 'tails don't stand a chance. It does look like they separate more than a traditional C-n-C, going from 125 to 68. But I don't know if that's a bad thing. Certainly wasn't in this case.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    125grHornadySSTLoadWork14.jpg

    w/ 49.0gr of H4895
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,243 Senior Member
    Zee, just curious but what made you use the 125 grain instead of the more traditional (what is it?) 150 grain?
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    Wasn't there some issue long ago with Nosler's initial poly-tipped bullets blowing up on impact? I think that may be what had me boogered about them. Plus that one deer I saw with the "burn wound" with no penetration.

    If they'll do that to a hog... My poodle sized 'tails don't stand a chance. It does look like they separate more than a traditional C-n-C, going from 125 to 68. But I don't know if that's a bad thing. Certainly wasn't in this case.

    You have to consider, I'm using light for caliber bullets (odd for me to actually do that). Muzzle velocity is 2,888 fps and impact velocity at 50 yards (the one bullet I recovered) was 2,750 fps.

    Now, it may seem odd to have recovered the closest impact bullet, but it's actually not. The higher impact velocity caused the bullet to upset quicker. Add to that, the shield of a hog (even back from the shoulder) is somewhat more substantial than the skin of a deer. So, higher impact velocity and stouter hide equated to more resistance. Like diving into water at 100 miles per hour.................you're gonna shed some serious weight if not fully come apart.

    I would fully have expected that first bullet to have exited had the target been a deer of equal weight.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    Zee, just curious but what made you use the 125 grain instead of the more traditional (what is it?) 150 grain?

    I have killed a slew of critters with 150, 165, 168, 175 grain bullets out of a .308 Winchester. Call it boredom..............I just wanted to try something else. Tired of using the same thing.

    I'd thought about using the bullets for a reduced load for the kids. But, the reduced load I'm running in my .243 Short is working just finr for them. So, I'll just load these to full speed.

    Maybe.........just maybe.........I'll appease CPJ and load one in my .300 Remington Ultra Mag and see how fast we can get it. :fan:
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,053 Senior Member
    Buffy-- Those SST's are just cup and core bullets with a bit of a modern twist. The cannula is there to lock that core in. The red plastic makes them look dangerous. Essentially, the SST's are a good, inexpensive bullet. I got them in lots of calibers and they shoot pretty good.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,053 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    Maybe.........just maybe.........I'll appease CPJ and load one in my .300 Remington Ultra Mag and see how fast we can get it. :fan:
    Yes please.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    Buffy-- Those SST's are just cup and core bullets with a bit of a modern twist. The cannula is there to lock that core in. The red plastic tip gives them a higher BC. Essentially, the SST's are a good, inexpensive bullet. I got them in lots of calibers and they shoot pretty good.

    FIFY
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,053 Senior Member
    It is kind of interesting seeing how they perform on a bone shot like CPJ's deer, then the others through the ribs with one of them recovered. I get the impression that the SST's will perform well with any reasonable shot on deer sized game in pretty much any caliber.
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