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Hunting clothes, high tech or old school?

MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior MemberPosts: 4,805 Senior Member
Seasons are almost upon most of us, some of us already started!

So, we have talked footwear, ammo/bullets, rifles, distances, glass, range finders.....lets chat up our choice in hunting clothes!!

I do a mix of both. Old school being some trusty Mil-Surp wool pants. New school being Under Armor and high tech poly jackets and such. Going to pick up some outer fleece at BPS since they're on sale freakin CHEAP and 3rd rifle season is now in November, could be 65, could 5. I have always wanted some fleece outer wear stuff, love the silence of it. Gotta pick up some more UA stuff too, but DAMN is it expensive....of course, when your life might literally be on the line I guess you can't put too high a price tag on life. Besides, death is free :wink:
Wambli Ska wrote: »
Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
«1

Replies

  • beartrackerbeartracker Senior Member Posts: 3,116 Senior Member
    Little of the high tech, but mostly old school.
  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    High Tech, I guess. UA and Berber Fleece. Or some type of fleece layer depending on the weather. If it's cold.....Windstopper is the BOMB! I don't buy any cold weather gear without Goretex Winstopper or some type of wind proof layer in it.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,148 Senior Member
    For colorblind animals as dumb as deer, simply sitting still in whatever you're presently wearing with the wind to your advantage is often good enough. Conversely, I'm finding better results with some sort of modern cammo pattern, particularly with ducks or other color sensitive critters. I've had occasions wearing Max-4 on all of my clothing, caught between the decoys and my grass blind, where I simply laid into the bank of the slough and had the approaching birds circle right over me oblivious to my presence. On many of those occasions they surveyed the spread for a bit, with me right next to it, and came right into firing range. That is typically not the case before I had my waterfowl jacket and had to wear the plain sweater top.

    I know a lot of folks have killed a lot of stuff in the days before fancy printed patterns, but I believe there is an advantage in certain circumstances. Pheasants? Yeah, right...jeans, whatever top is appropriate for the weather with a blaze orange vest/hat. Ducks/Geese? I'm using anything and everything I can muster in a good camo pattern if a box or layout blind is not an option.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • gatorgator Senior Member Posts: 1,746 Senior Member
    Dove and Quail is jeans and a earth tone shirt my vest is camo though.
    Deer is jeans and maybe a camo shirt,or something dull.
    Coyotes is camo head to toe,with gloves and a facemask.
    USMC 80-84
    -96 lbs
  • U TU T Member Posts: 423 Member
    Not much high tech for me. If it's cold, I have some good polypropolene or fleece long underwear, then $7 Walmart sweatpants with final layer of lightweight camo pants, and I buy them xxlarge so I can layer up thick if necessary. Boots are normally Danner pronghorn with thinsulate. If it's not cold, I wear the xxlarge pants modern camo, and they're baggy. I almost always wear a cabelas hooded sweatshirt xxl so I can layer up under it, but ony wear the hood if it's cold and windy, and always a camo baseball cap. Gloves, I don't like thick ones, just normally camo jersey gloves, the long cuff ones that go up my wrists, and with the trigger finger cut off, for my bow realease or gun trigger. I do have higher tech rain coat and pants, in modern camo. What's so great about Under Armor? Seriously, is it worth the money? I think I stay as warm as my buddies that spend all that money on UA? UA is now making boots, but I don't know if they're triple the cost of regular ones?
  • beartrackerbeartracker Senior Member Posts: 3,116 Senior Member
    gator wrote: »
    Coyotes is camo head to toe,with gloves and a facemask.

    Amen, plus hiding in the cover around me :that:
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,740 Senior Member
    We hunt out of blinds around here (brush too thick for effective spot n stalk), so I usually just wear jeans and a t-shirt with appropriate cold gear. In years past I would deck out in camo, fancy boots, etc... But then I wised up and realized that for what I do, I don't need it. The closest I get to camo is an old BDU Field Jacket. I tend to like cold weather (why oh why do I live in Texas?), so I'll wear just a T shirt and a sweater or light fleece until it gets down to about 40 or the wind picks up.

    If it gets really cold I'll throw on a base layer (but really cold in Texas is 30). I think the worst I've hunted in is 20 something with a high wind, nothing too bad with long johns and a good jacket.

    Hell, one year a glass table fell on my foot and sliced it open, and I hunted in tennis shoes 2 sizes too big to accommodate the bandage and swelling.

    I think if dad and I go on a NM pronghorn hunt like we keep threatening to, I may *gasp* spring for a camo hoodie. Or not, I've found ACU's actually work well out in the NM desert.
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,740 Senior Member
    U T wrote: »
    What's so great about Under Armor? Seriously, is it worth the money? I think I stay as warm as my buddies that spend all that money on UA? UA is now making boots, but I don't know if they're triple the cost of regular ones?

    I think UA is great, but not for the same reasons everyone else might. For me the number one reason I go with UA is to prevent chafing and rubbing, plus some of their products actually do insulate really well (such as that turtle neck cold weather undergarment thing). I feel like their sweatshirts, jackets, shoes, backpacks, etc are all just a marketing scheme, but their basic stuff really does work.
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 11,150 Senior Member
    My hunting is pretty similar to SS3, except I still get decked out in Camo since I stalk the way into and out of the blind. Plus, if the deer aren't coming in, I like to get out and see if I can scare something up.

    But I use mostly old school stuff in layers. A thin wind stopper outer jacket 2 sizes larger than I need, with layers underneath so I can shed them if it warms up. Since I have hunted in 4 degrees all the way up to 80 degrees (the widest temp swing in one day of hunting was 25degrees in the AM, and 60 in the afternoon)- you have to shed layers.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    What I like about UA is the light weight and quick drying aspects. I can layer with half the bulk and weight and attain the same amount of warmth. I am a firm believer in layers! As I'm shifting layers with the changing temps or mobility, I can ball up the cloths and stuff them in my ruck with little space taken up and nominal weight. I'm a mobile hunter so changing layers is a must to prevent overheating and bulk.
  • bklysenbklysen Member Posts: 476 Member
    Mostly the higher tech stuff. I agree with SS3 on the UA gear, I believe their base layer stuff is worth every nickel, the outer stuff no better/worse than far more economic choices.

    For the very cold weather, I use Cabela's (MT050?) bibs/parka - both are a fleece-like outer, wind stopper stuff that is completely silent and incredibly warm. I'm sure others sell the same thing, different label. But you can sit in it for hours in some very cold temps. The feet become my downfall in weather like that.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    BPsniper wrote: »
    What I like about UA is the light weight and quick drying aspects. I can layer with half the bulk and weight and attain the same amount of warmth. I am a firm believer in layers! As I'm shifting layers with the changing temps or mobility, I can ball up the cloths and stuff them in my ruck with little space taken up and nominal weight. I'm a mobile hunter so changing layers is a must to prevent overheating and bulk.

    This.

    I don't sit and wait to shoot, I actively hunt. Sometimes you can luck out and catch elk on the move if you know some common routes, but they aren't like white tail who will use the same trail their entire life. You gotta get out and find them if you don't catch them moving right at first light. When you are bundled up too much and start walking straight up hill, you'll sweat buckets. Then you are wet. Then...you risk hypothermia. I'm a bit surprised by how much cotton is worn! The saying out here in the West is "cotton kills". It holds water and doesn't insulate, you get caught out in a bad storm or fall in a creek through the ice or something, your life could seriously be at stake in a VERY short time.

    I always played off the UA stuff as over priced gimmicks...until I tried them. They really are comfortable, and the compression garments really do help keep the blood flowing in the right places.

    I put much stock into camo patters, not because they don't work, but because in this state I have to wear 500sq" of blaze orange, so, not much point lol. I do have some camo stuff basically because, well, thats what hunting gear comes in now. I try to find patterns that are close to the environment I hunt in though, help break up the outlines a bit. Problem is I hunt in varying terrain, from white/tan sage brush meadows to thick, dark timber. Almost have to choose where you hunt that day before you gear up lol.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    U T wrote: »
    What's so great about Under Armor? Seriously, is it worth the money? I think I stay as warm as my buddies that spend all that money on UA? UA is now making boots, but I don't know if they're triple the cost of regular ones?

    I think it is. Do I wish it was cheaper? Hell yes! But, you get what you pay for, that is for sure. I use the base layers and I have a blaze orange UA beanie. That thing is light as can be but REALLY keeps you warm. I also have my giant football helmet orange beanie thats like a toasty campfire on your head (it was in my pic of the elk I shot 2 years ago on the old board, most poked fun at it lol) when its REALLY cold.

    I guess a lot of it really comes down to what/where you hunt. Here in the late rifle seasons, cold is C O L D. I've gone out at 3:30am when its -15. When you start getting down to around 20 or so, in our incredibly dry air, your nostril hairs start to freeze. Very odd feeling. I know people have hunted there for hundreds of years with lesser clothing, I did as well for a long time. However, since starting to buy and use the UA and high tech stuff, my comfort level has sky rocketed, and when you are comfortable you don't get tired, when you don't get tired, you can hunt harder.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,939 Senior Member
    Little of the high tech, but mostly old school.

    +1.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,920 Senior Member
    Really all depends...mild days during bird season, it's pretty much every day clothes(jeans, etc) and a pair of good walking boots...
    When the weather goes south, I'm all about UA,(I find that UA glove liners are amazingly warm) fleece, gore-tex type wind stoppers. Layers are definitely the way to go. All in all the new stuff is lighter and in truth more efficient than heavy wool garments.
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,713 Senior Member
    Whatever I can find that suits our climate and fits. Oh, I also look to see if they have made new changes that do not work as well as old school.

    Last time I needed an upland coat, for example, all the new gear had shell loops on the outside instead of in the pockets. That is just dumb and causes lost ammo.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • wildgenewildgene Senior Member Posts: 1,036 Senior Member
    ...low tech/ high tech, tweeked thru 30yrs. of cruising timber all winter...

    ...base layer of SmartWool, wool retains heat even when wet, no synthetic does...

    ...wool or fleece running pants/ wool shirt/ balaclava. If you want to control your core temp, think of your neck as a radiator, w/ two large arteries/ veins very close to the body surface...

    ...outer layer of camo, wind-resistant, soft, quiet material, generally a "compressed" or finished fleece. I'm not really concerned w/ "waterproof", between the wool & wind resistant outer layer, along w/ movement I can retain enough body heat to stay comfortable & functional, pretty easy to adjust layers...
  • 1965Jeff1965Jeff Senior Member Posts: 1,644 Senior Member
    A mix of both; hunted in WY when in the AM temp was -3 , also experienced that here in KS last year. Use UA and like how it works throughout the day. Also bought a Cabelas windstopper jacket @ 5 yrs ago & LOVE it. Wool socks combined with liner socks combat cold feet very well.Not sold on gore-tex water proofing,( is anything totally waterproof). I feel scent free clothing is a oxymoron long on moron part and a waste of $$.
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,973 Senior Member
    low tech..... skin's and loin cloth, stick and string. ;)

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,110 Senior Member
    Summer hunting: Woodland camo BDU pants, T shirt, woodland camo shirt, carry a camo polar fleece hoody ( one of the ladies that works for me is a seamstress and she makes them up to my design....Over size hood, large twin front pockets and about 2 sizes bigger than my size)

    Winter hunting: Polar fleece pants with built in waterproof fabric from waist to mid thigh, ( allows me to sit/crawl on wet ground without discomfort) Thermal longjohns/ long sleeve skivvy, t shirt, the liner from one of my BDU jackets, BDU shirt, same hand made polar fleece hoody, polar fleece beanie.
    All clothes washed in sportwash to get rid of UV enhancers.

    Layering is where its at for me as well. All layers are lightweight and compress to very small 'packages'

    Problem I have is that during the week in summer I am working in anything up to 50c+ temps in the orchidhouses for up to 12 hrs.When the sun goes down and the temp drops to 20c, the temp difference makes me feel cold. (Most other hunters here wear shorts and T shirts in summer.)

    I can hunt when cold and I can hunt when wet..........I cant hunt/stalk when cold and wet irrespective of season.

    Duck hunting in winter on the 'salt', where I sit in the boat without movement I may have 6-8 lightweight layers on top and 3 on bottom.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    BigDanS wrote: »
    low tech..... skin's and loin cloth, stick and string. ;)

    D

    Pics or I call BS lol
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • SlanteyedshootistSlanteyedshootist Senior Member Posts: 3,947 Senior Member
    BigDanS wrote: »
    low tech..... skin's and loin cloth, stick and string. ;)

    D

    You work for Geico?!? So easy......
    The answer to 1984 is 1776
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,575 Senior Member
    Mostly high tech. I haven't found any UA that was comfortable to me, yet. I felt like I was stuck in a sausage casing, so I returned them. BLEH!
    Anyway, since I work outside year round, it's pretty important for me to be warm, dry and comfy. I mostly stick to polypro long underwear, with some heavy silk and fleece ones for really cold days. Wool or smartwool socks, always. I'm trying to wean out cotton, but it's tough. Working on adding more layering weight fleece. I have some of the MTO50 hunting outerwear, as well as some windstopper stuff for hunting. Quite often, though, I just wear heavy canvas, double knee Columbia hunting pants, and a Cabelas hoodie.
    Of course, working construction, Carhartts are a neccessity, 2 or 3 sets of them, in varying weights, and my winter hunting boots usually pull double duty as my winter work boots.

    Although, one of my favorite pieces of hunting gear, is decidedly old school. Filson tin chaps. Awesome, awesome. I don't go rabbit or pheasant hunting without them.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,035 Senior Member
    For me it's mostly hi tech stuff. I'm a big fan of GoreTex.

    But, I've developed a new found appreciation for good wool products. Throw a little GoreTex over some wool and you can tackle darn near anything. I bought a Filson Mackinaw cruiser about three years ago and I don't think I've ever worn anything quite as warm with no more bulk than it has. Granted, the Browning 4 in 1 deal is probably a bit warmer, but it's three times the bulk.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,625 Senior Member
    A mix of wool and polar fleece and synthetic longjohns for deer hunting with some quilted bibs over that for the subzero days. Some waterproof camo parka from Gander for cold duck hunting and wool pants in hips or chest waders for water fowl, whatever with an orange vest for grouse and pheasant. I am very happy with my Columbia wool BDU's, orange Elmer Fudd hat, and orange light jacket that is wind and water proof.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    Picked up some Redhead 1856 Fleece from BPS today. What all that means? Not a clue, except decent enough fleece for 20$ tops or bottoms! Got both! Got a poly/cotton blend hooded sweatshirt too just cause....well, it was by the register and on sale for 15$ lol. I'm horrible like that.

    For you guys that use wool....how the heck do you clean your stuff? Mine honestly haven't been cleaned in....oh, ever. Always afraid of shrinking them or screwing them up, I only use them as an outer layer over 1-3 layers under that. But, I know they'll do their job better if they are clean. Dry clean?
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,625 Senior Member
    I dry clean them at the end of the season, otherwise they get stuffed into a heavy duty garbage bag and layered with spruce boughs.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • beartrackerbeartracker Senior Member Posts: 3,116 Senior Member
    Linefinder wrote: »
    Throw a little GoreTex over some wool and you can tackle darn near anything.

    Mike

    Yes, Mike you said a mouth full there. That is what I mean by some high tech (a little GoreTex) and mostly old school (Wool and Silk). When it is cold and damp, and you are spot and stalking, with the potential to sweat, "Cotton can kill", I avoid cotton in my cold weather stuff. It makes for pretty good summer wear because it holds moisture, but that's a killer in cold weather.

    Cotton is a hydrophilic fabric which means it easily absorbs moisture , as in sweat from your body to the material itself, and is horrible for wicking it away from the skin. It just lays on you feeling cold and wet. Cotton will become damp even on humid days.


    You can use this to your advantage on hot days by constantly keeping your cotton shirt and bandanna wet. This will not only keep you cooler but you'll lose less body water because you aren't sweating as much since your already "wet". Put a wet 100 percent cotton shirt on and go out side in the snow then take it off, realizing that being naked feels much better than being soaked with a cotton shirt. Let's say you fall in a lake during winter and you were stranded, it is better to go naked over wearing it until you can dry it out with a fire. Cotton has no insulation when wet - meaning get it wet and it will cool you off not keep you warm. Now you do the same with wool and it will still keep you warm even though it is soaking wet.



    Cotton when hot is GOOD - DRY Cotton when cold is sort of OK (if it does not rain, you do not sweat much, or you do not fall into water) - BUT - WET Cotton when cold is a death sentence.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Both.
    And I have seen the fleece that BPS has on sale. I plan on getting one of the jackets. I LOVE that camo pattern. Not sure why, But I think its cool.
    And the UA stuff (base layer stuff) is the bomb.

    Hopefully they have your size when you go. They didn't have my size in the non-hooded jacket when I went yesterday, the gal running the department said that stuff has been FLYING off the hangers. Go a size or two bigger then normal, that stuff runs a bit small. I had to get an XL jacket if I actually wanted to wear anything under it.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,953 Senior Member
    Super quiet with ease of movement.......usually wool
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