Looks like I will be antelope hunting afterall

Six-GunSix-Gun Senior MemberPosts: 7,226 Senior Member
...but not where I expected.

After 3 unsuccessful years of putting in for a very good area near my work, I unexpectdly drew a Nevada buck antelope tag. I had only three bonus points and about a 1:10 chance to draw one of only 23 resident tags for the area. It figures that it would happen the year that I have to move, forcing me to fly back only 2 months after I head out of here. LOL.

So, uh...any tips?
Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.

Replies

  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,726 Senior Member
    Shoot the one with the 20" horns;).
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,226 Senior Member
    Ah, got it. Sounds easy enough!
    :p
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • KENFU1911KENFU1911 Senior Member Posts: 1,052 Senior Member
    Fly back earlier......spend lots of time scouting............where I'm at goats are easy.....with a tag............the tags my take 20 years of bonus points...........lots of scouting........and good luck..........You Suck...............Ken
    My idea of a warning shot is when the 2nd bad guy watches his 1st buddy go down....
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,726 Senior Member
    Would it help to hire a guide with your time constraints and change of residence?
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,440 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »

    So, uh...any tips?

    About the only advice I can give is that they're usually farther away than you think they are. Antegoat hunting is the only big game game I've played where 250 yards is a "gimme".

    Have fresh batteries in your rangefinder. You'll be using it. A lot.

    Mike

    Oh.....practice (even in your living room) the sitting position. Better than bipods or monopods when things are happening fast. But, when assuming the position for real, watch out for cactii.

    Oh....another another thing. I've found a 250 yard zero to be the most useful for antegoats. If you use your 6mm Rem (my weapon of choice against the mighty beasts), you're good with a center of chest hold out to around 325 or so, and a top of back hold out to 450 or so. The one I shot at 440 a couple years back was with about 6"-8" of holdover above its back (with a 250 zero), and I hit it slightly high through the shoulder. Beyond that range, you usually have time to dial the shot. But, a 250 yard zero covers you nicely from muzzle to a quarter mile.
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,482 Senior Member
    You may see them at a distance, or one or more may pop up right in front of you unexpectedly. In other words, be prepared for finding them just about any where.

    If you see some at a distance, sit and watch them for a spell. Sometimes one will simply walk to you, especially if it's early in the season. They are curious animals. And, sometimes you can figure out where they headed and get there before they do.

    Like Mike said, make sure you have a good range finder, as estimating distances over wide open ground is tricky at best.

    Good luck.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,226 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 wrote: »
    Would it help to hire a guide with your time constraints and change of residence?

    The area I got drawn for should preclude the need for a guide. It has a large cluster of alfalfa fields in it and when you are in an otherwise barren desert landscape, the place with lush green and flowing water, as you can imagine, is the happening place for antelope to hang out. All you need to really do is figure out their ingress routes to the private land and seeking permission isn't a factor. The hard part is beating out the handful of other successful applicants to the good spots. The nice thing is that a few of the guys I work with live in the area I'm hunting, too, and have already agreed to keep an eye out for me since they didn't draw this year.

    I will definitely be practicing the sitting position . With my B&C reticle and my .243, I'll be keeping my 200 yard zero since it's dead-on accurate out to 500 yards, field verified.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 10,726 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    The area I got drawn for should preclude the need for a guide. It has a large cluster of alfalfa fields in it and when you are in an otherwise barren desert landscape, the place with lush green and flowing water, as you can imagine, is the happening place for antelope to hang out. All you need to really do is figure out their ingress routes to the private land and seeking permission isn't a factor. The hard part is beating out the handful of other successful applicants to the good spots. The nice thing is that a few of the guys I work with live in the area I'm hunting, too, and have already agreed to keep an eye out for me since they didn't draw this year.

    I will definitely be practicing the sitting position . With my B&C reticle and my .243, I'll be keeping my 200 yard zero since it's dead-on accurate out to 500 yards, field verified.

    A day or so of scouting is probably good enough anyway, but hate to waste an opportunity, good to have folks scouting for you.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,440 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »

    I will definitely be practicing the sitting position . With my B&C reticle and my .243, I'll be keeping my 200 yard zero since it's dead-on accurate out to 500 yards, field verified.

    Wow, I must have missed something. When did you get a .243?
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,440 Senior Member
    Another tip, especially if the area you're hunting has knee high grass or cover.

    You may see a herd of antelope a mile away milling around, and after watching them for a while, decide they're the only goats in the area. You hop in your truck to move a half mile or so, and before you've traveled 200 yards, there's a group of goats 200 yards away, seemingly appearing by magic.

    Nope. They're the ones that were laying down in cover that you thought wouldn't hide a squirrel.

    If most of what you're seeing is out of range or across property lines, don't be afraid to move around. Chances are good you'll kick up a shooter or two.

    Mike
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Use your .284 Winchester XP-100 pistol.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,226 Senior Member
    Linefinder wrote: »
    Wow, I must have missed something. When did you get a .243?

    I bought it a couple if years back to hunt my mulie. It's the Tikka T3 Lite Stainless that Zee was kind enough to paint the on for me. It lives up to it's name. You hardly notice it's there until it's time to shoot.
    CHIRO1989 wrote: »
    A day or so of scouting is probably good enough anyway, but hate to waste an opportunity, good to have folks scouting for you.
    . I will definitely be adding a couple days to the top of the trip to get re-acquainted. You are right about not wanting to waste a great tag.
    Linefinder wrote: »
    Another tip, especially if the area you're hunting has knee high grass or cover.

    You may see a herd of antelope a mile away milling around, and after watching them for a while, decide they're the only goats in the area. You hop in your truck to move a half mile or so, and before you've traveled 200 yards, there's a group of goats 200 yards away, seemingly appearing by magic.

    Nope. They're the ones that were laying down in cover that you thought wouldn't hide a squirrel.

    If most of what you're seeing is out of range or across property lines, don't be afraid to move around. Chances are good you'll kick up a shooter or two.

    Mike

    Good to note. I will be keeping that in mind. Aside from the alfalfa, there's very little cover out here, BUT the rolls in the ground will hide a 'lope as good as anything.
    Zee wrote: »
    Use your .284 Winchester XP-100 pistol.

    Heh...yeah, I would, but...let's just say that the guy who initially built it managed to destroy the stock bedding so badly that twice McMillan tried to repair the bedding block over the past 4 months and twice they failed and finally, just this past week, declared the stock unsalvageable. He tried to hide it by burying the broken bits in bedding compound, which of course failed after a limited number of shots. I took pics of it if you really want to be horrified. The only good news is that McMillan is giving me a one-time replacement for free. It still means a few more months wait and that the gun won't be up and running until way after the goat season ends.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Dang. That sucks.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,226 Senior Member
    It sucks, but the good news is that, if I was willing to forego a marble finish and take a paintable one instead, McMillan had three in stock that merely need painting. That takes the turn time down from 6 months back in line down to just a few weeks. Of course I took the offer, so I should have a desert camo replacement in about a month. The real killer for making it ready for antelope season is the need for all new bedding work to fit the new one. That will take more months and pretty much kills any hope of using it for its intended purpose, at least this year.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    Whoever jacked up your stock made a douchebag move. Bedding your stock takes a day and a night. You can have that done before the season.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,226 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    Whoever jacked up your stock made a douchebag move. Bedding your stock takes a day and a night. You can have that done before the season.

    With the centergrip and a Dell Taylor trigger bar, you do apparently need to do some mill work to make it all fit with the aluminum bedding block, but it should never have gotten THIS ugly or complicated. I'll send you a pic of the damage shortly.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.