"there will be a rifle behind every blade of grass"

gaimangaiman BannedPosts: 60 Member
"you cannot invade the United States". Japanese admiral yamamoto was trained here in the US, so he was aware of the production ability of the US. what he didn't know was that we knew that those old clunk battleships were history, and we suckered him into rousing the US populace against Hitler, too, just like FDR planned it.
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Replies

  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Can you come to my house and talk to my garden? Fertilizer is getting pretty expensive these days!
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
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  • FlashoverFlashover Member Posts: 390 Member
    Think is his case it's a tool behind every bud of grass
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 26,222 Senior Member
    Flashover wrote: »
    Think is his case it's a bong behind every bud of grass

    Fixed it for you. If he were a tool, he'd be a broken one, like a pipe wrench with the lower jaw missing! :rotflmao:
    If the U.S. Congress was put in charge of the Sahara Desert, there would be a shortage of sand in under six months.



  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,953 Senior Member
    Well, he's partially right, but most of this is common knowledge. Admiral Yamamoto did say that if they invaded the U.S. there would be a rifle behind every blade of grass. But I don't think he ever said that the U.S. couldn't be invaded, AND I don't think this is why they didn't try it. It was merely a word of caution to some of the more zealous eager beavers among his peers. In fact, the Japanese considered it for a while. But, cooler heads prevailed. Had they done so, the casualties on both sides could easily have been as high as they were predicted for our own proposed invasion of Japan at the end of the war.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Re: "there will be a rifle behind every blade of grass"

    And a Buffoon on every Internet forum.

    buf·foon /bəˈfo͞on/
    noun
    noun: buffoon; plural noun: buffoons

    a ridiculous but amusing person; a clown.synonyms:

    clown, jester, fool, comic, comedian, wag, wit, merry andrew, harlequin, Punchinello, Pierrot More
    "the king's buffoon"
    fool, idiot, dolt, dunce, dunderhead, dullard, ignoramus
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,270 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Well, he's partially right, but most of this is common knowledge. Admiral Yamamoto did say that if they invaded the U.S. there would be a rifle behind every blade of grass.

    No...he's not right...(Like everything else he posts) it was post war rhetoric made up by a historian...Yamamoto never uttered those words....

    see this http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Isoroku_Yamamoto

    particularly, this

    "You cannot invade the mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind every blade of grass."

    "It has been declared this attribution is "unsubstantiated and almost certainly bogus, even though it has been repeated thousands of times in various Internet postings. There is no record of the commander in chief of Japan’s wartime fleet ever saying it.", according to Brooks Jackson in "Misquoting Yamamoto" at Factcheck.org (11 May 2009), which cites Donald M. Goldstein, sometimes called "the dean of Pearl Harbor historians", writing "I have never seen it in writing. It has been attributed to the Prange files [the files of the late Gordon W. Prange, chief historian on the staff of Gen. Douglas MacArthur]".
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    gaiman, your quote is correct but your supposition is not. That's urban legend. You REALLY need to check your sources before you come out with this goofy stuff, as it's not helping your image in the forum. Best to play the cards close to the vest, eh?

    Yamamoto went to school at, I think, UCLA but it was some California school, and knew the US very well. He was typical of the "new breed" of Japanese naval commanders, very worldly. Whereas the army was still mired in the Shogunate era and it was they who pushed and persuaded Hirohito to attack the US (not that the emperor needed much pushing, as he was gungho for war anyway).

    Yamamoto campaigned against bringing the US into the war but after the decision was made, he worked long and hard to do his best as any loyal military man should. The true story was that he was up 2-3 days with little sleep, prepping the attack, and when the planes took off, he crashed out with orders to arouse him when they returned. His junior officer woke him and said "Great victory!" and Yamamoto calmly asked "How many aircraft carriers were sunk?" and the aide replied "None" (all our carriers just happened to be at sea).

    It was then Yamamoto said his famous and true prediction, that "We have awakened a sleeping giant that will arise and crush us."

    As we all know, Yamamoto was on a visit to his battle groups in the Pacific and to avoid detection, he flew in a small plane with just one or two escorts. But the Japanese didn't know that we'd cracked the Purple Code and knew his plans. So Adm. Bull Halsey sent a squadron and they shot down Yamamoto, killing him, and removing the single best naval mind they had.

    A small addition... During the 80s I worked for a Japanese computer company startup in the US, in the SF Bay Area. We were all flying to Boston to a joint conference with our east coast branch, and we left from San Jose early and flew, got breakfast, switched to a "heavy" (big plane) in Salt Lake, then flew flew flew hours, were served lunch, flew flew. And I was sitting next to Kenichi Katsube, one of the engineers (who spoke perfect English), and he said "We've been flying for hours and we're just half way. What they should have done in 1939 was to make every Japanese officer travel across the USA just to see the immense size -- there was no way possible for the US to be defeated. So many lives lost, such a terrible thing, all so stupid."

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,240 Senior Member
    Sam, you are confusing the move "Tora! Tora! Tora!" with the truth. Yamamoto was never documented as having said the line about the sleeping giant, nor was he shown to have said to have said anything about rifles behind blades of grass.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Well, I'll bet ole Yamamoto said 'CRAP I've had my last cup of Saki' when he realized P-38 Lightnings were waxing his butt over the Pacific Ocean that glorious day!

    https://www.google.com/search?q=p-38+lightning+shot+down+Yamamoto&sa=X&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&ei=WxOSU8iCCrHNsQTM0YGoBg&ved=0CCwQsAQ&biw=911&bih=400

    Videos from both sides about it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39-yZ_2aao0
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,270 Senior Member
    samzhere wrote: »
    gaiman, your quote is correct but your supposition is not.

    No Sam, his quote is not correct....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,953 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    No...he's not right...(Like everything else he posts) it was post war rhetoric made up by a historian...Yamamoto never uttered those words....

    see this http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Isoroku_Yamamoto

    particularly, this

    "You cannot invade the mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind every blade of grass."

    "It has been declared this attribution is "unsubstantiated and almost certainly bogus, even though it has been repeated thousands of times in various Internet postings. There is no record of the commander in chief of Japan’s wartime fleet ever saying it.", according to Brooks Jackson in "Misquoting Yamamoto" at Factcheck.org (11 May 2009), which cites Donald M. Goldstein, sometimes called "the dean of Pearl Harbor historians", writing "I have never seen it in writing. It has been attributed to the Prange files [the files of the late Gordon W. Prange, chief historian on the staff of Gen. Douglas MacArthur]".

    Why? Because Wiki said so? Well here is more info about it that doesn't necessarily prove it is so, but it makes Wiki's view at least suspect. Also, you can't always count on Wiki to be correct because it's a bunch of everybody's opinion. Anybody can contribute to Wiki. When I was in school on line, none of my professors would admit what Wiki said as a source for a paper or assignment.
    Here's some other sources I found that add credence to the opinion that he did infact say it.


    Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/cannot_14.html#AOckpyZ6MXs3OxrE.99

    You cannot invade the mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind every blade of grass.
    Isoroku Yamamoto

    Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/cannot_15.html#CMcYovCfCQ6u90Bp.99
    http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/united.html
    Conflict of whether Yamamoto said about a rifle behind every blade of grass.
    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2817517/posts
    To: Hugin
    And for the record, before someone posts it, Yamamoto never said invading America was impossible because there would be a rifle behind every blade of grass.
    Why because Wikipedia says so? There's a bastion of valid American research for you. In fact, 5 seconds on Google found at least this, though the author is obviously loathe to admit it. Nevertheless, it appeared he did indeed say it in an interview, and therefore probably off the record as well.

    There is some poorly documented evidence that Yamamoto, in an alleged interview with a small New England newspaper, when asked if the Japanese intended to invade the US responded with the "blade of grass" quote.
    http://thehunterslife.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13584
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,270 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Why? Because Wiki said so?

    No..Wiki has nothing to do with it...I don't rely on wiki for an education, however, in this case it was merely the most convenient way to get the information. Whether he did or whether he didn't was something we discussed and researched in a college history class many years ago...in the end only the good General knows for sure...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    That does it, lets go dig that **** Admiral up and ask him :tooth:
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Hell, he might have a whole book of quotes someplace, most we ain't never heard about. Most high ranking officers have/had a captive audience so to speak, of lower ranking military who have to suffer through their rants/opinion/sayings/lectures and can usually just nod their heads in agreement.

    The better career they had, the more famous they were, the more they are quoted or attributed to saying whatever and a lot of it gets misquoted or misinterpreted as time and circumstances pass. Especially, back in the days before video was widely used.

    Ole Custer might have said "I really screwed up and my scalp will be hanging in a Tee-Pee tonight" who knows?
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,953 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    No..Wiki has nothing to do with it...I don't rely on wiki for an education, however, in this case it was merely the most convenient way to get the information. Whether he did or whether he didn't was something we discussed and researched in a college history class many years ago...in the end only the good General knows for sure...

    I'll meet you in the middle and agree on that.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,953 Senior Member
    Chief I think you're closer to right than any of us here. We will never know for sure though. But for sure I love your imagined possible quote Custer may have said.

    "I really screwed up and my scalp will be hanging in a Tee-Pee tonight" who knows?

    I just wish someone would have witnessed it, :rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao:
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,203 Senior Member
    Mind. Blown.

    The Arizona was what, 24, 26 years in service when it was bombed? Hardly clunker battleship....

    So to make the attack realistic we put all those sailors on the ships? :roll:

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • Pelagic KayakerPelagic Kayaker Banned Posts: 1,503 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Why? Because Wiki said so? Well here is more info about it that doesn't necessarily prove it is so, but it makes Wiki's view at least suspect. Also, you can't always count on Wiki to be correct because it's a bunch of everybody's opinion. Anybody can contribute to Wiki. When I was in school on line, none of my professors would admit what Wiki said as a source for a paper or assignment.
    Here's some other sources I found that add credence to the opinion that he did infact say it.


    Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/cannot_14.html#AOckpyZ6MXs3OxrE.99

    You cannot invade the mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind every blade of grass.
    Isoroku Yamamoto

    Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/cannot_15.html#CMcYovCfCQ6u90Bp.99
    http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/united.html
    Conflict of whether Yamamoto said about a rifle behind every blade of grass.
    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2817517/posts
    To: Hugin
    And for the record, before someone posts it, Yamamoto never said invading America was impossible because there would be a rifle behind every blade of grass.
    Why because Wikipedia says so? There's a bastion of valid American research for you. In fact, 5 seconds on Google found at least this, though the author is obviously loathe to admit it. Nevertheless, it appeared he did indeed say it in an interview, and therefore probably off the record as well.

    There is some poorly documented evidence that Yamamoto, in an alleged interview with a small New England newspaper, when asked if the Japanese intended to invade the US responded with the "blade of grass" quote.
    http://thehunterslife.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13584

    Many are quick to dismiss history based on the works of what one particular historian has deemed and take those opinions as gospel. In truth, we'll never know what Yamamoto said. However, the "quote" was most likely uttered in one context or another either by Yamamoto or other Japanese officers. Like Yamamoto, many Japanese officers were partially educated here in the states prior to the outbreak of hostilities and had full knowledge, as well as respect, for American industrial/resource capabilities as well as our armed citizenry. Also true, Yamamoto was opposed to any US/Japanese conflict, however, in the end, he followed orders.

    Up until June, 1942, the IJN was a formidable foe that was more than capable of crushing our entire naval fleet. Even with forlorn hope, had the IJN been given free reign without Japanese Army bureaucracy questioning every plan of Japanese naval officers, the war in the pacific would have no doubt lasted until the late 40s or even early 50s. Rest assured Snake that that quote was said more than once (by many IJN officers) regarding the idea of a mainland invasion.

    btw... for further reading on this subject read "Samurai" by Saburo Sakai and "Japanese Destroyer Captain" by T Hara.
    "The reflection upon my situation and that of this army produces many an uneasy hour when all around me are wrapped in sleep. Few people know the predicament we are in" ~General George Washington, January 14, 1776
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Sam, you are confusing the move "Tora! Tora! Tora!" with the truth. Yamamoto was never documented as having said the line about the sleeping giant, nor was he shown to have said to have said anything about rifles behind blades of grass.

    Never saw that movie all the way through, thought it was overly long and quit watching, so I never saw the Yamamoto scene. I did however read the "sleeping giant" quote somewhere, years ago, forget where. If it's fiction, sorry, Same for the blade of grass quote. Read it somewhere and thought it was accurate. Sometimes stuff like that gets embedded into the general story line of things, and then is transferred into the urban legend area and then gets repeated in legit stories or books. I know for certain that I read both of those quotes in some "authentic" article or book, not fiction, but things like that get transferred sometimes into "fact" when they're not.

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    JasonMPD wrote: »
    Mind. Blown.

    The Arizona was what, 24, 26 years in service when it was bombed? Hardly clunker battleship....

    So to make the attack realistic we put all those sailors on the ships? :roll:

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk

    Okay, you got me. I really don't understand the thrust of your post. Please elaborate. Thanks.

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Big Chief wrote: »
    That does it, lets go dig that **** Admiral up and ask him :tooth:

    No digging, I think he went down at sea, right?

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,371 Senior Member
    No, Yammamoto went down in the jungles of Bouginville, which he was going to inspect. I have no idea if he said the blade of grass thing or not, but I doubt it. Japan simply could not invade the US. Several thousand miles from Japan to the US. Hitler couldn't invade England, which was only 20 miles away from occupied France. Yammamoto studied at Yale for two years.

    I saw Tora, and as I remember from that movie, what was alleged to have been said, "I fear we have awakened a sleeping giant and filled him with a terrible resolve." I don't know if that's true or not either.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    I thunk a **** Field Marshal did say (something to the effect of) after the US entered the war, all was gonna be lost fer Germany because of our natural resources/industrial might and it was well documented.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    Gens. Rommel and Guderian were very reticent about America getting into the fight. I remember a passage from one either's books...."yes our soldiers are better trained......we have unit cohesion, we have better equipment, we are defending the Fatherland........but they have more of everything, and will overcome us in the end........when that time comes.......I'd rather my divisions surrender to the Americans so they will live, because there will be no mercy with the Russians."
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,203 Senior Member
    samzhere wrote: »
    Okay, you got me. I really don't understand the thrust of your post. Please elaborate. Thanks.

    :uhm:

    It was a sarcastic retort to gaiman's moronic assertions about the ships at Pearl Harbor.

    Sometimes I think you read posts with a predisposed conclusion; making reading any of the words pointless.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • Pelagic KayakerPelagic Kayaker Banned Posts: 1,503 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    No, Yammamoto went down in the jungles of Bouginville, which he was going to inspect.

    And an incredible feat that was! It was Yamamoto's punctuality that killed him. Being a stickler for insisting on always being on time it was just a matter of P-38 pilots using dead reckoning, plotting intersection/resection and using a stop watch for intercepting a target gathered by a chance intel communiqué. Great book on this story. Also, the kill went to a different pilot years later.
    "The reflection upon my situation and that of this army produces many an uneasy hour when all around me are wrapped in sleep. Few people know the predicament we are in" ~General George Washington, January 14, 1776
  • Pelagic KayakerPelagic Kayaker Banned Posts: 1,503 Senior Member
    JasonMPD wrote: »
    :uhm:

    It was a sarcastic retort to gaiman's moronic assertions about the ships at Pearl Harbor.


    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk

    In fairness, the battleships were "clunkers" and almost useless. The Pacific Theater was a carrier campaign. The main intent of the Pearl Harbor raid was to destroy our carriers and oil reserves. ...both failed. Many don't realize that there was supposed to be two separate raids that Sunday with the "afternoon" raid destroying oil reserves and other targets.
    "The reflection upon my situation and that of this army produces many an uneasy hour when all around me are wrapped in sleep. Few people know the predicament we are in" ~General George Washington, January 14, 1776
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,203 Senior Member
    In fairness, the battleships were "clunkers" and almost useless. The Pacific Theater was a carrier campaign. The main intent of the Pearl Harbor raid was to destroy our carriers and oil reserves. ...both failed. Many don't realize that there was supposed to be two separate raids that Sunday with the "afternoon" raid destroying oil reserves and other targets.

    Clunkers by what standard? There were newer ships, but the Arizona and her sister ships were far from useless.

    Sam has emersed himself in a few different lines of conversation on this thread and read mine with predisposed assumptions about its context--including that I was somehow trying to get in his conversations. It didn't fit with any of his conversations so demanded an explanation to it's meaning.
    Fact of the matter is it was a one-liner retort to the OP, nothing more.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    JasonMPD wrote: »
    :uhm:

    It was a sarcastic retort to gaiman's moronic assertions about the ships at Pearl Harbor.

    Sometimes I think you read posts with a predisposed conclusion; making reading any of the words pointless.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk

    Er, no. I simply didn't understand the sarcasm. Or rather, whether you did mean sarcasm or were trying to be factual.

    Sent from my trusty HP Pavilion using Sprint 4G

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    No, Yammamoto went down in the jungles of Bouginville, which he was going to inspect.

    Thanks for the correction. I thought he'd been lost at sea. Keen.

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. - Groucho Marx
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