I still get squeamish when gutting game, am I the only one?

shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior MemberPosts: 5,445 Senior Member
The title kind of says it all, but I've been hunting for about 7 years now and I still get a little squeamish when I gut an animal. It was the same thing for me in HS biology, got a little squeamish whenever dissecting came around.

It's all part of the hunt, so I still do it, and I'll even dig around a gut pile to try and find a bullet (my 7mm-08 usually passes through and through though), but I don't particularly like it much. Am I the only one?
- I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
"Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski

Replies

  • shawn1172shawn1172 Senior Member Posts: 588 Senior Member
    You're not alone. I've been hunting for 28 years and I still get a bit squeemish when the cutting starts. Not too bad though. Never thrown up or anything. For me, the worst part is cutting off the poor boys nether regions and cutting out the but hole. The gut, lungs etc aren't that big a deal. Unless it's a gut shot..... then that part can be the worst. My cousin is the worst I've seen. He's been hunting longer than me and gutted more deer but he has the hardest time with it. I've witnessed him lose his breakfast a couple times.
    Worst guttiing experience- the first moose hunt I went on. My dad shot a cow just after she'd been getting it on with the local bull. There was..... stuff. Alot of it. I will say no more.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 7,151 Senior Member
    Hopefully, I'll be able to tell you in about a week.:tooth:

    I haven't done a mammal in a quite a large number of years, but those rabbits were a bit stinky on the inside. I don't have a problem with any of the sights or feels of the gut-piling process, but certain smells can get my gag reflex going. I wouldn't call it squeamishness - more autonomic response. Bananas do the same thing to me - I think I'd rather crawl around inside a dead elephant than be too close to somebody "skinning" one of them.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • SirGeorgeKillianSirGeorgeKillian Senior Member Posts: 5,458 Senior Member
    What big slug said. I got no problems mushing my fingers around in the gut locker, but some of the smells could make me glad I didn't eat a big breakfast.

    Sent from my Motorola Atrix 4G via Tapatalk
    Unless life also hands you water and sugar, your lemonade is gonna suck!
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I'm in love with a Glock
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,270 Senior Member
    Never been too squeamish when it comes to that stuff...just breath through yer mouth...but once I gutted a road-killed nursing doe on a hot day....Yuck!

    I still have to wonder though about those folks who gut a critter and end up looking like they took a bath in it....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,445 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    I still have to wonder though about those folks who gut a critter and end up looking like they took a bath in it....

    This is a true statement. Worst I get is some on my pants and shirt from wiping it off to get a better grip on the knife.
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 15,379 Senior Member
    After the crap (don't even get me started on crap!!!) I have had to see and do in nursing school, gutting an animal just doesn't phase me.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,270 Senior Member
    Jermanator wrote: »
    After the crap (don't even get me started on crap!!!) I have had to see and do in nursing school, gutting an animal just doesn't phase me.

    True...my time in EMS hardened my stomach considerably...Humans can be downright nasty...can you say "Lower GI Bleed?" don't even want to breath through your mouth for fear it will get on your tongue...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,102 Senior Member
    Don't gut then.
    Skin and quarter the animal-gutting is not required.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • temmitemmi Member Posts: 230 Member
    I never had any problem gutting or skinning.


    I guess I just am one of those callus types
  • justin10mmjustin10mm Senior Member Posts: 688 Senior Member
    When I was real young I didn't want to touch that gooey stuff, but it doesn't bother me now.

    If you just ate, you might not want to see this.
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 718 Senior Member
    I've never had an issue with it, cutting or gutting, and the smell is just not a problem for me, to be honest I actually enjoy the whole process, but than again I've been killing and butchering domestic pigs, sheep and poultry my whole life, the way I figure it, whats the reason to be sick? you're preparing an animal that you and your family wil eat together and which will provide you with sustenance, I also eat offal (read guts) too, I think that liver is delicious, as are kidneys.
    I don't begrudge anyone that does mind gutting, but I can't understand it myself, what does get my goat though is when you take someone shooting and then they don't help gutting, or at the least serve as an automated knife block and steel holder, thats when I start to get snake eyed
  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    I actually enjoy it. Love doing necropsies and seeing what the terminal performance of the bullet did to the pieces parts. So, I usually take my time and take the animal apart in layers like an autopsy so I can study the bullets path. That is interesting to me.
    "....the true general purpose big-game cartridges used in this country come in but two calibers, .30 and 7mm. (the .270 Win. is merely a slightly aberrant 7mm whose bullets are .007" undersize.) -Finn Aagaard - American Rifleman, December 1986
  • CaliFFLCaliFFL Senior Member Posts: 4,891 Senior Member
    I enjoy it as well.

    I have always opened fish stomachs to see what they are feeding on. I catalog the time of year, time of day, moon cycle, location, etc. I perform this same process with game. It makes hunting and fishing easier year after year.
    The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me.

    Ayn Rand
  • wildgenewildgene Senior Member Posts: 1,036 Senior Member
    ...parts is parts, what's the big deal???
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,431 Senior Member
    I have no issue getting bloody mitts out of the gutting process. It's the ripe smell from a gut-shot deer that makes me wanna vomit. I've never gut shot a big game animal and I hope I never do, but my buddy's dad put one right through the corn pipe and didn't find it until the next day. I got downwind of that one and nearly, VERY nearly lost my lunch.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,735 Senior Member
    BPsniper wrote: »
    I actually enjoy it. Love doing necropsies and seeing what the terminal performance of the bullet did to the pieces parts. So, I usually take my time and take the animal apart in layers like an autopsy so I can study the bullets path. That is interesting to me.

    Pretty much:agree:. Taking your time and looking during the process will teach you more about terminal ballistics than any charts, tables, or books could ever begin to.

    Doesn't bother me at all. Never has.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,240 Senior Member
    I can handle most issues other than smells. I'm a biologist! We do animal necropsies all the time! The things I can't handle are:
    a. Rotting animal. Which isn't applicable to game.
    b. Infections. Just nasty. Never had the problem with an infected animal myself, but I've been called over to "check this out."
    c. Poo and gut contents. The smell can make me want to vomit.

    Other than that: there's the heart. Lungs look good. Oooh! A spleen!
    Overkill is underrated.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 11,103 Senior Member
    The first couple deer were tough when I was younger, no big deal with rabbits and grouse. After I worked on 3 different cadavers for a year, nothing was gross compared to that. I also tend to check things out on big game as I am gutting it.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • farm boyfarm boy Senior Member Posts: 987 Senior Member
    Never had a problem with it. I have a distinct memory of my Uncle stretching out a steers eye to look at me through it, I was probably six. I had a pet pig when I was five (Dad had a feeder pig), his name was Flower (I had just seen Bambi). I can remember sitting in the back seat of the van having boxes of frozen pork stacked under my feet. When Mom got back in the van I asked "Is that Flower?" Mom answers yes. "Can we have pork chops?"


    In my senior A&P class we dissected cats (minks were to expensive), my group was the only one with a fully caped out cat. The teacher nearly hit the roof when I asked to bring in my own knife because her scalpels were to dull.
    I am afraid we forget sometime that the basic and simple things brings us the most pleasure.
    Dad 5-31-13
  • Wheelsman56Wheelsman56 Member Posts: 225 Member
    When I was a kid learning how to gut deer I nicked a stomach once, maybe twice. I learned quick NEVER to do that again. Gutting animals really doesnt bother me at this point. I can do them very quickly.
  • ADRidgeADRidge Member Posts: 173 Member
    I never enjoy it, but it's not something that makes me queasy or anything. It's one of those things that the sooner you do it, the sooner it's done and you can go inside, drink a beer, tell everyone how the hunt went and watch some football.
    In space no one can hear you scream... but if you put a helicopter up there, some jerk would complain about the noise!
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,737 Senior Member
    Don't gut then.
    Skin and quarter the animal-gutting is not required.

    Where I hunt now in Alabama, I can do that but in some of the other states that I've hunted in, the animal has to stay whole until it reaches it's final destination. In fact, years ago when I hunted in Wisconsin you couldn't put an animal in the trunk or a cooler. Other than field dressing, it had to be left intact with the tagged leg visible while it was being transported.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,953 Senior Member
    I don't know if Squeemish would be the term I would use, but if i have a good supply of clean running water I'm ok. I don't like blood and entrals drying on my hands. Also, I like to wash the gut cavity out good too. And also a sharp knife is a must. I don't usually field dress. I like to take the animal back camp and skin it first, then gut it. It keeps hair off of the meat that way.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,747 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    I think what bothers me the most is grabbing a hold of Mr Whitetails ball sack and cutting it off.

    They make awesome tobacco pouches..................
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • DalebowDalebow Member Posts: 45 Member
    15 years of working in surgery guess has given me an iron stomach. Kind of neat to do surgery on a kill:-)
  • QuinianQuinian Senior Member Posts: 707 Senior Member
    Yeah like others said it's not so much the mess that gets me it's the smell. I call it "deer breath" because it doesn't smell bad until you cut the diaphragm (spelling?). I know this sounds girly but I just hold my breath, slice it open, back up and wave it out for a min before finishing.
  • deadeyedeadeye Member Posts: 73 Member
    I have been known to stop half way through the process and cook a piece of tenderloin and make a sandwich of it. Then finish the job one handed while i finished my sandwich..........Yummmmmmmmm
    No Need To Run, You Will Only Die Tired
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,747 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    My dad got me into the OR for the first time at 12. After that nothing seemed like a big deal.

    Similar story here...............When I did my great OE ( 'overseas experience') I spent 14mths working at Stoke City General Hospital in Stoke-On-Trent..............as a morgue porter and attendant. Tasks included wheeling dead people out of wards in the morning to assisting the pathologist with Post Mortems ( One of them used to eat his lunch while carrying out the PM......as I did also!!).
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
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