Removing grime/oil from wood

waipapa13waipapa13 Senior MemberPosts: 715 Senior Member
I picked up a Savage 99 take down in 22 hi power (C. 1924) at the gun show yesterday and the wood is dark and almost black in places with age and accumulated grime and oil/dirt,
what's the best way of getting some of it off, not looking to completely refinish, just a bit of TLC, also was recommended that I shim the barrel to tighten it up a bit, any thoughts on that (headspace?)

Thanks,
Waipapa

Replies

  • KENFU1911KENFU1911 Senior Member Posts: 1,052 Senior Member
    What I do.........sounds stupid.but works......take the stock off.then very hot water and Dawn dish soap....fast scrub and wash,,,,then dry as fast as possible...you don't want the water to soak into the wood..... once its completely dry....give it a couple days to be sure...a few very thin coats OF BLO......and it will look much better.....Ken
    My idea of a warning shot is when the 2nd bad guy watches his 1st buddy go down....
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,305 Senior Member
    I've removed SERIOUS oil with oven cleaner. It should only be done in extreme cases, as it is caustic. I used it on an Enfield and it removed most of the oil. If it's just grime, soap ought to do it. I would avoid taking the stock off if possible, and do not take the action down unless you're a genius. They're not made to disassemble. The takedowns are sought after, so you have a very collectible rifle.

    BTW, a .22 High Power takes .221 bullets or so, won't do to shoot .224. Especially early rifles like yours.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 715 Senior Member
    Thanks, I will try the dish washing liquid route, I've had good luck with it on stained porcelain tea cups before so it doesn't sound stupid to me, and like Gene said oven cleaner is always a last resort.

    As for the barrel, the gist of it seemed to be to pack it out with auto shims around the shank of the barrel, this was an old guy standing next to me trying to put me off buying it (I basically ignored him, think he wanted it for himself) is this wise?, I can see issues with it regarding head space. Thanks for the responses
  • KENFU1911KENFU1911 Senior Member Posts: 1,052 Senior Member
    Oven cleaner......or Foaming engine cleaner.....I only use on old Mil-Surps......it work great on old Mosins and Enfields ..........and a really cosmode P-17........... but I wouldn't use it on that rifle.........Ken
    My idea of a warning shot is when the 2nd bad guy watches his 1st buddy go down....
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,305 Senior Member
    I'd get a gunsmith to deal with the headspace problem. I don't have a clue on fixing it. Possibly the reason it's loose is because someone had been shooting .224 bullets and stretched the frame.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 15,174 Senior Member
    waipapa13 wrote: »
    As for the barrel, the gist of it seemed to be to pack it out with auto shims around the shank of the barrel, this was an old guy standing next to me trying to put me off buying it (I basically ignored him, think he wanted it for himself) is this wise?, I can see issues with it regarding head space. Thanks for the responses

    Buy a set of GO/NO GO gauges...then worry about it when you find out if you actually have a problem...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • 5280 shooter II5280 shooter II Senior Member Posts: 3,923 Senior Member
    I'm with Ken on a fast wash with Dawn. We used Dawn to detail our tanks...that GAA is persistent stuff. I used it to clean up the stocks on an FN/Browning Auto 5 16 gauge......acquaintance of mine was gonna sell it off shoulder at the Tanner show, and didn't know what he had......so I says "hop in the Jeep".......off we go to the ATM.......I pulled 6 bills and handed them right over to him. Since this guy was recently divorced and broker n broke.....you'd think I just parted the seas by the tears welling. Was it an economic deal? Borderline......did it help a buddy out and put a hella cool shotgun in the stall? Priceless!!
    God show's mercy on drunks and dumb animals.........two outa three ain't a bad score!
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 715 Senior Member
    Ok, so a set of headspace gauges is a starting point, from there, if I have no headspace issues I can proceed to pack the shank out?
    Or look to **** the threads for lock up (google search brought that up, I'm loathe to) the alignment slot is about 1/4 inch out when the barrel is tightened fully, the start of the threads is slightly worn, very slightly, also saw something about using a metal saturated aviation epoxy and lead wire for a permanent fix.
    One other solution is something I've used for stripped threads on bolts in cars, something coil, wire which allows a stripped or worn thread to bind.

    Thoughts?
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,509 Senior Member
    helicoil? That could work, I suppose, but it requires you to either drill/tap a female thread, or turn/rethread a male thread. Me? If it's that messed up, I think I'd have a gunsmith weld it, and rethread it. I wouldn't take any chances on a threaded joint that holds the front of my rifle onto the part that's close to my face.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,982 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    I bet Murphys Oil Soap would work.
    That would be a good test and would not hurt anything.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,807 Senior Member
    One option for cleaning the oil out of the stock is to get it hot and hang it so excess oil drips out. Mil-surps covered in cosmoline, take a heat lamp, and put it inside a metal garbage can, and stand it up with the butt at the top. Make sure you have a way to determine the temperature. About 150 F for a few hours will sweat it all out. Wipe off with a shop towel. Murphy's oil soap it and dry immediately. That is about the gentlest way without harming the finish.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • gunwalkergunwalker Member Posts: 470 Member
    Here is a simple thing to try. Get a mister clean foam pad,dampen it and dampen the wood. It should remove most surface dirt. The used murphys oil soap with a coarse rag such as an old dish rag.
    We do not view the world as it is, but as we perceive it to be.
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 715 Senior Member
    I hit it with dish washing liquid and hot water and it worked a treat, I'm letting it dry for now in the hot water cupboard, it'll get another scouring in a couple of days, really took the crap out of it and lightened the wood considerably, can't believe how easy it was, thanks for the advice everyone.

    If I rebarrelled it could it be a .224 barrel with the 22 h-p chamber? Bullet selection seems very limited in .221.
  • KENFU1911KENFU1911 Senior Member Posts: 1,052 Senior Member
    waipapa13 wrote: »

    If I rebarrelled it could it be a .224 barrel with the 22 h-p chamber? Bullet selection seems very limited in .221.

    Should be easy enough for a decent smith to do.....
    My idea of a warning shot is when the 2nd bad guy watches his 1st buddy go down....
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 715 Senior Member
    Thanks for all your help Ken, much appreciated.
    I'm starting to think this might be my project rifle, rebarrel, reblue, re-stock, spend the money and the time to have a fully restored rifle with some higher end native timber and irons.
    I've only got $380 invested in it so with work it won't blow out extraordinarily, especially staggered over the next few years
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,305 Senior Member
    Yes, if you get a rebarrel job, get it in .224.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • brians356brians356 Member Posts: 157 Member
    The vintage guitar repair and restoration experts use naptha solvent (or just common naptha-based lighter fluid) to clean and remove oil and grime from bare wood. It is also harmless to any wood finish, even thin, cracked old nitro lacquer. Those old guitars can be worth well into six figures, so "First, do no harm" applies. Any time older wood needs to be glued or refinished, naptha is typically used as a prep. It works with the finest spruce as well as hardwoods like mahogany, rosewood, maple, and ebony, so will work with walnut or what have you.
    "If this is flag waving, can you think of a better flag to wave?"
    Irving Berlin
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 715 Senior Member
    Thanks for the naphtha suggestion, another good idea,
    I just got quoted $1800 and "I'd rather not" for making a new takedown barrel by a very well regarded smith here, so I'm fairly flummoxed as to what to do, try another smith I suppose, there's only about 5 in the country
  • KENFU1911KENFU1911 Senior Member Posts: 1,052 Senior Member
    Slug the barrel..............I have read lots of reports..of good accuracy from .228........224... .223...... Bullets..........maybe all you need is the head space checked out..............any take to the range.....Ken....
    My idea of a warning shot is when the 2nd bad guy watches his 1st buddy go down....
  • waipapa13waipapa13 Senior Member Posts: 715 Senior Member
    I'm gonna try and do a rough headspace with an empty cartridge and some tape and maybe then I'll **** the threads slightly
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,305 Senior Member
    I made a mistake earlier: the bullet is .227 diameter. So it will take a .224 fine, although it may suffer accuracy-wise. Also, you MAY be able to have the barrel sleeved. I don't know if this is possible with a higher powered rifle, but it's worth looking into.

    Peening the threads is something I don't understand, but I'm no gunsmith. I know some will **** the lug on a double shotgun to bring it back on face, but it's temporary at best.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
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