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Nevada Antelope Buck Success

Six-GunSix-Gun Senior MemberPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
I waited 4 years to draw a buck tag in a unit near one of my work locations in Nevada. Of course, the year I have to move, I get drawn and have to fly back two months after I leave, but I wasn't complaining. Lots of good bucks around this area. The big catch would be the fact that I would be unable to scout until just a day prior to my hunt, but that would turn out to be okay as you will see below.

Day 1 - Not much to report here other than safely arriving in Las Vegas with all of my gear ready to go. I grabbed my rental car at the airport and drove the additional 4 hours up to my hunt unit. My work buddy from up here, Kirk, had not only been keeping an eye on the herds for me while I was away, he also lent me his travel trailer so that I could have a place to stay free of charge during the hunt. That's way above and beyond in my book. To cap it off, he offered to take the day off and join me through the weekend, if necessary to lend an extra set of eyes. I took him up on it and we made meeting plans accordingly. I got a good night's rest and was ready to go for my hunt as a result of his generosity.



Day 2 - This was my planned scouting day and I made the most of it. I used up a full tank of gas driving to every inch of my area, looking high and low for groups of antelope. There were plenty to be seen as I traveled the roads, along with some other native wildlife.

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In the months leading up to my hunt, I vigorously looked at Google maps and took note of the alfalfa fields dotting the otherwise barren landscape. While I didn't think it would be possible to get private access on these fields, I made it a point to stop by the ranches that owned them and see if I could beat the odds. Lo and behold, a little friendly conversation (and a fresh bottle of Crown Royal) goes a long way in securing private land access around here, it seems. I got permission to hunt the most active antelope section that I found in the entire scouting period. While I found some slightly bigger bucks in very isolated stretches in other areas, the number at this ranch were too overwhelming to ignore. He also had a boatload of coyotes on those fields (note to self for a future hunting request).
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During the middle afternoon, I saw two very nice bucks trotting near the northeast fence line with a large group of does. I would've gladly taken a shot at whichever one was closer if the season was open at that moment, but it wasn't. I would have to hold out hope that 1) one or both of the bucks would be back in that spot the next morning and 2) since this fence line was exposed to passing vehicles, I could beat out Joe Public, who would assuredly be setting up near the fence, just chomping at the bit to catch these bucks before they made it onto private land. Having access to the private side, I still felt I had the upper hand in the battle for position. I told Kirk to meet me at the trailer bright and early and that the northeast-most fields would be our starting point he next morning. This is clearly where the biggest bucks wanted to be.


Day 3 - This was it - opening day: game time. Despite the strong temptation to chase a very, very nice buck on public land a few miles south of the field that I saw at the end of Day 2, I stuck to my guns and drove with Kirk up to northeast corner of the ranch. We were in position an hour before daylight and it wasn't long before the public land hunters starting filing up near the fence as I feared would happen. The good news was that Kirk was able to turn the truck facing the fence and the adjoining road and kick on his headlights. As soon as the people along the road realized that someone from the private land was right on top of their position before they had arrived, they pulled up and left leaving just one truck outside the fence who still wanted to try and beat us out.

At about 10 minutes prior to legal daylight, Kirk saw the faintest hint of an antelope that slowly turned into a doe as the sun slowly illuminated her tan and white coat. Since I never did get to see where to group from the day prior went to bed, I asked him to start driving that way to see if others were hidden by the curve of the field. I knew from the day prior, driving around the pivots, that the sight of a truck slowly cruising the alfalfa circles would not spook these antelope. We creeped up near where we had last seen the doe. I had my binos up, scanning a bumpy, washboarded image when I got visual of a single doe that quickly became three as we approached the fence. We were very close when they started appearing, well under 200 yards. Then, suddenly, a buck stood up and showed himself. I immediately said to Kirk, "that's gotta be one of the good ones from yesterday." Kirk got his binos up as I said this and without even taking a moment to formally reply, he said, "that's a shooter, get out of the truck now!" Obligingly, I opened the truck door and slipped behind it, getting braced quickly but calmly on a nearby fence post. The buck didn't spook hard as I set up for the shot, but he did get a little tense and start walking away. I lasered him at 128 yards.

At 5:59AM, exactly 20 minutes into legal daylight and opening day of antelope season, I sent a 100 gr. Sierra Pro-Hunter from my .243 Win. handload at 3,003 fps toward the antelope, who was moving right to left and just slightly quartering away at the shot. I don't normally like taking shots at animals walking even at a casual pace. Past experience has taught me that even at relatively short ranges with good, moving swing on the gun, bullets can hit significantly further back than the point of aim when they arrive at a moving target. However, this was a case of now or never, as he would soon be behind a series of heavy fence posts that would make for a very difficult shot. I lead the buck just a few inches forward, at the front point of his shoulder and dead in line with where the tan and white fur meet. At 128 yards, this load (zeroed at 200) would strike about 1.5" high, well within the kill zone, and I estimated that it would impact right behind the shoulder. The proof would be in the pudding.

When the bullet reached the buck, there was no mistaking the sound of flesh and metal colliding. But, when I came back down from the modest recoil, I was already lost. Out of nowhere, what was once just a handful of does and this buck erupted into 17+ does on the run - all of whom had been bedded and out of sight - with no discernible buck in sight. For a moment, I panicked. "where did he go?" Kirk matter-of-factly exclaimed a moment later, "oh, he folded right up at the shot."

Sure enough, when I looked closely at where I had shot when the does finally moved out of the way, the buck was piled up, deader than death itself. He never took another step.

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Kirk was almost as happy as me and he wasn't even holding a tag. We couldn't believe how well it all came together. It wasn't even legal sunrise yet on opening day and my season was over. It was a great experience to share with him. The buck taped out at 15", a very respectable first buck and definitely above average around here.

I should add, I used this same Tikka T3 Lite Stainless .243 Win rifle on my mule deer hunt a couple years back. This is the same gun that Zee took the time to paint in a custom, Alumahyde desert finish for me. I forgot to post a pic of it with my deer on the last hunt I used it on, so I made sure to get a shot of it with the animal this time. Thanks again, Zee! Once again, the gun brought home the bacon.

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The post-mortem revealed a devastating double lung shot with very little meat damage. The bullet entered the buck just behind the shoulder, just as I planned it and almost exactly 1.5" above my point of aim, like the ballistics software says it should. It blew a beautiful, clean hole through both lungs, smashing the far shoulder blade on the way out. Despite hitting bone and losing some jacket bits at the exit point, as usual, the Pro-Hunter did remarkably little meat damage, one of my favorite features of this bullet. The real test of a bullet, in my mind, is how well it kills at close range while simultaneously saving as much meat as possible. Once again, this bullet got it done.

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Entry wound:
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Exit wound:
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Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
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Replies

  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    All in all it was a great hunt. It was incredibly fun and rewarding to share it with Kirk and to experience his great generosity along the way. He even gave me a hand skinning and butchering it. The buck's cape and head are now at the taxidermist in Reno and will be put up on my wall in honor of this great trip.

    The big takeaway: always, ALWAYS scout as hard as you can within the time you have available. Despite having just one day to scout, I located many potential shooter bucks and earned access to private land that ultimately resulted in the antelope I took home. If I went into opening day blind and guessing, I almost assuredly would've wasted valuable time in areas that turned out to be hit with hunter pressure and had fewer quality bucks. It goes without saying, but I have to say it anyway - NEVER forsake the time you have available. Get the wheels turning, glass on the hills and boots on the ground to make it happen. Virtually every successful hunt I have had involved some degree of quality scouting time, regardless of how long that time actually was.

    The big reward for getting it done early? I'm spending the rest of the week fly fishing in Utah! :applause:
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    I soooooooooooooooo envy you. I want to hunt speed goats something fierce.

    It was a ton of fun and truthfully, one of the easiest big game hunts I've ever experienced. The sucky part is that it will be a long time before I can draw in Nevada again. Apparently, once you score successfully on an antelope hunt, you have to wait 5 years before you can even apply again. That means I have to wait 5 years before I can even start building preference points toward another hunt, so it could easily be a decade before I can do this same hunt again.

    Bottom line: if you want to hunt these critters, you need to start putting in for points NOW. Don't let another season go by without at least applying. I've got 2 point going into next year's Colorado draw, so hopefully that will happen and I can go two years in a row. If not for prior applications, I'd still be sitting on my thumbs and you will, too, if you don't get crackin'. Next year, get a hold of me, JerryBobCo or MHS and we can help you apply.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 25,424 Senior Member
    Amazing hunt, awesome buck, and excellent write-up. You did your homework and it paid off. Well done.

    Ummmmm..........I see no picture
    of the rifle. Just say'n.

    ;-)
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 25,424 Senior Member
    I love hunting antelope (second favorite game animal after muley).
    I love the .243 Winchester.
    I love the Tikka T3.

    There's much love here.


    You you getting a shoulder mount?
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • shootershooter Senior Member Posts: 1,186 Senior Member
    Congratulations on a fine antelope! I love to hunt antelope and can appreciate what you went through hunting both private and
    public ground. My first hunt in Wyoming also ended within the first half-hour of the season with a similar buck.

    I would like to see your rifle, though. Good job.
    There's no such thing as having too much ammo, unless you're on fire or trying to swim!
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,807 Senior Member
    Good shot!

    My last whitetail was a walking broadside at 118 yards, so I felt like I was right there with you when I read your account. I didn't lead at all and was surprised that my shot was a couple inches further back than I expected (still a double lunger, and cleared the off-side shoulder with no damage).
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    Great write up Luis, and congrats on an excellent hunt.

    CPJ, since you are out of state anyway, you could hunt Wyoming or Montana, and they have lots more antelopes.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,924 Senior Member
    Great hunt hey.



    I see cpj was in this pic on the far right
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,974 Senior Member
    Well done Luis!!! :worthy: :beer:
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    I forgot to post a pic of it with my deer on the last hunt I used it one, so I made sure to get a shot of it with the animal this time.

    :uhm: :confused:

    Zee wrote: »

    Ummmmm..........I see no picture of the rifle. Just say'n.
    :that:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,462 Senior Member
    EXCELLENT buck, Luis! They don't grow them like that where I hunt. If they did, I'd probably never hit one, buck fever being what it is.

    I'm glad you were able to "bump" the other hunters out of your field of fire beforehand, but, it kind of bears out the advice "The more, the merrier". Much like dove hunting, the more folks/vehicles milling around the field tends to keep the goats bunched up and moving around instead of laying low. Unless things get crazy-overcrowded (kind of tough to do in antelope country), I've never minded seeing a few trucks and orange vests moving around in my chosen area.

    On a couple of occasions I've hunted antegoats after opening weekend (once with JerryBobCo and once by myself). After opening weekend, at least in these parts, you'll rarely see another hunter afield. On both those occasions, sightings of goats (much less, shot opportunities) were few and far between.

    Hunting antelope, when there's a fair population of hunters in the area, is more like hunting ground-bound dove than deer.

    Great hunt, great memories, and great thread! Congrats.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,462 Senior Member
    Oh, BTW.........did you notice the scent of the antelope I told you about? Not unpleasant, but totally unlike anything else you'll ever smell.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Sorry, guys. I realized that Photobucket wouldn't let me correct the link last night and forgot to update it this morning. I just overwrote the pic with the gun over the one without it (see original post). The brush was relentless in blocking a good view of it, but you can at least see Zee's excellent paint job. I can't stress how perfect it is for this environment.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 13,284 Senior Member
    I am impressed by the quality of the animals and fish you are able to get on in the field, color me envious, that is a nice antelope:up:.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Linefinder wrote: »
    EXCELLENT buck, Luis! They don't grow them like that where I hunt. If they did, I'd probably never hit one, buck fever being what it is.

    I'm glad you were able to "bump" the other hunters out of your field of fire beforehand, but, it kind of bears out the advice "The more, the merrier". Much like dove hunting, the more folks/vehicles milling around the field tends to keep the goats bunched up and moving around instead of laying low. Unless things get crazy-overcrowded (kind of tough to do in antelope country), I've never minded seeing a few trucks and orange vests moving around in my chosen area.

    On a couple of occasions I've hunted antegoats after opening weekend (once with JerryBobCo and once by myself). After opening weekend, at least in these parts, you'll rarely see another hunter afield. On both those occasions, sightings of goats (much less, shot opportunities) were few and far between.

    Hunting antelope, when there's a fair population of hunters in the area, is more like hunting ground-bound dove than deer.

    Great hunt, great memories, and great thread! Congrats.

    Mike

    Thank you all very much! This is a great unit that only has 28 buck tags given out and plenty of quality shooters to pick from. To put it in perspective, around here, my 15" buck barely raises an eyebrow. He's above average, but not a worldbeater. My other friend's daughter shot a 16" buck last year on a similar series of fields in this unit and a few folks a year take 17" goats. I am lucky enough to have access to some of the military-restricted land out here where there is no public access and they can't be hunted. I can say that there's one buck living out there that I won't bother describing because you would call me a liar. I'll just say that most folks will never see a buck like this in their life - unreal height and mass.

    For full disclosure, there was another buck that I strongly considered taking. He didn't have the mass that mine had, but he was tall and had cool horn shape. I went to see if his location was still huntable the next morning as a backup option in case the field was a bust, but someone was already parked on the edge of the road where he had been, well before even we arrived in the pre-dawn hours, and clearly was after that same buck. This was him below (the heat waves kill the clarity, but you get the drift - I'd guess him close to 16"):

    IMG_2308_zps222bfe06.jpg

    There were plenty of good quality bucks around, and Linefinder, I did remember what you said about goat hunting getting charged up when there's a little bit of pressure driving it, but I had driven this particular field the day prior, knew exactly where these goats were and how they were behaving. I didn't want anyone messing that up considering that I knew we would be will within 300 yards of the herd if my hunch about how to hunt them was right. I was really hoping the headlight trick would drive folks away. Thankfully, it played out liked I hoped it would, but your advice was still in the back of my head.
    Linefinder wrote: »
    Oh, BTW.........did you notice the scent of the antelope I told you about? Not unpleasant, but totally unlike anything else you'll ever smell.

    Mike

    Yes, Mike - it was...different. Kirk's wife came out to the garage while we were skinning and processing. Her first words were, "oh, I recognize that smell."
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,462 Senior Member
    Around here, 12" isn't trophy class, but it's sure one you'll consider having mounted. 15" would be a jaw dropper. The buck in the last pic you posted will rarely be seen in this state, let alone the one you bagged.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    Good shot!

    My last whitetail was a walking broadside at 118 yards, so I felt like I was right there with you when I read your account. I didn't lead at all and was surprised that my shot was a couple inches further back than I expected (still a double lunger, and cleared the off-side shoulder with no damage).

    I hear you. That very thing nearly bit me in the butt on my mule deer hunt. I just barely clipped the back of the lung and liver shooting at a buck at 250 yards while he was just strolling along. I aimed behind the shoulder but that is NOT where the bullet landed, more like 6 - 7" back. I realized then why my PH in Africa refused to let me take a shot at a walking animal, even at 80 yards. It's amazing how much the bullet can lag when the critter is on the move.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Linefinder wrote: »
    Around here, 12" isn't trophy class, but it's sure one you'll consider having mounted. 15" would be a jaw dropper. The buck in the last pic you posted will rarely be seen in this state, let alone the one you bagged.

    Mike

    I remember you mentioning the size expectations out your way and have kept that in mind for when it comes time to hunt out there. I don't want to sit all day staring at good bucks because I think something bigger might come along. Ya gotta hunt the hand you're dealt for a given area and would have no problem trusting you or Jerry telling me one was a shooter.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    That's not what I consider a "respectable" buck, Luis. I consider 15" a great buck. The one I have hanging on my wall only goes 14.5. You done good.

    Great hunt, and great story. Well done and congratulations.

    One question. Were you surprised at how brittle the hair is? I remember my first goat, thinking that the hair/fur would be very soft. I was wrong.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    I love hunting antelope (second favorite game animal after muley).
    I love the .243 Winchester.
    I love the Tikka T3.

    There's much love here.


    You you getting a shoulder mount?
    Agree.
    Agree.
    Agree.

    Yes, he's going to be shoulder mounted by Kevin Libby of Trophy Room Services outside of Reno. The guy who shot the biggest desert bighorn in the state last year (a guy who is also a guide up here and a personal friend of mine from work) recommended him. He used to work for Animal Artistry and now runs his own shop, doing some amazing work. His wife gave me a tour of the trophy room in their house and it is drool-worthy.

    Also, I meant to post this pic earlier, but forgot. To give you an idea of how crazy things got at bullet impact, here is a shot of the does that were with my buck and that rose up out of the brush at the shot. This was taken moments after the buck went down. Note how dim it is, since it isn't even 6AM yet. We only saw a fraction of this buck's harem until the bullet report and then they multiplied into this group you see. Talk about a confusing time to see if you need to make a follow-up shot! Thankfully, it was a moot concern.

    IMG_2312_zps098130b4.jpg
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    That's not what I consider a "respectable" buck, Luis. I consider 15" a great buck. The one I have hanging on my wall only goes 14.5. You done good.

    Great hunt, and great story. Well done and congratulations.

    One question. Were you surprised at how brittle the hair is? I remember my first goat, thinking that the hair/fur would be very soft. I was wrong.

    YES! I immediately got concerned about how to handle the goat when I saw how easily the hair breaks off. We went through great pains skinning and packing to minimize hair loss.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Farm Boy DeuceFarm Boy Deuce Senior Member Posts: 6,083 Senior Member
    Very nice buck. I really hope to one day hunt more than whitetail and pigs.
    I am afraid we forget sometime that the basic and simple things brings us the most pleasure.
    Dad 5-31-13
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,346 Senior Member
    Doesn't look like a jack rabbit could find a place to hide out there...... much less all of those antelope!
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Very nice buck. I really hope to one day hunt more than whitetail and pigs.

    Like I told cpj, the time is NOW to start planning for a hunt a few years down the road, especially as a non-resident. Your choices are more limited and you may have to wait a bit longer for a tag. Get to it! You won't regret it.
    jbp-ohio wrote: »
    Doesn't look like a jack rabbit could find a place to hide out there...... much less all of those antelope!

    The terrain is amazingly deceptive out here. What looks flat is actually rolling, and just a foot of rise in enough to completely hide one of these beasts. That's exactly what got us - these goats were all just under a terrain line in the distance from where we had stopped the truck.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    One more request, Luis. I want a range report on the meat. I can see that there's a lot of sage brush in the area, which I think leads to a strong, gamey taste. However, if the goats have not been eating the sage due to the alfalfa, it may be good eating.

    Also, regarding the sudden sighting of the harem, I have experienced similar occurrences. It will seem like there's no place for a jackrabbit to hide when all of the sudden there's a number of antelope in sight. And, I (and Mike) have experienced antelope appearing out of nowhere while I was field dressing one. I even recall Mike shooting a doe while I was gutting a buck I had just shot.

    Even though I don't have any desire to shoot goats any more, I'm looking forward to the first week of October when Mike and I, and maybe Mosseybuck (Paul), head east and try to get a doe for Mike. Chasing goats is dang near the most fun a hunter can have with his/her pants on. It's one time of the year I really look forward to.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    I can definitely do that, Jerry. Stand by for a report on the meat.

    It really is nuts how well these goats can be hidden in seemingly plain sight. I hope that you guys get a nice harem of does showing up like I had here. It'll be a short season!
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,515 Senior Member
    Nicely done Luis...

    I need to do this...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Does western KS have antelope like western NE? I'm sure it's a tough draw, but it would be close if it's possible.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,462 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    I can definitely do that, Jerry. Stand by for a report on the meat.

    It really is nuts how well these goats can be in seemingly plain sight. I hope that you guys get a nice harem of does showing up like I had here. It'll be a short season!

    I didn't even draw a tag last year, and the year before that the drought had moved all the goats well north of where I was hunting. We've had an unusually wet summer this year, though, and hopefully a lot of it fell on Kiowa county.

    But to show you how the drought has affected the area...................In previous years, they'd put out 600 doe tags for the draw, and usually have 300-400 "left over". Last year they put out only 300 tags, and I didn't draw. There were no leftovers. Same thing this year, only I drew. Probably because of the preference point I had for not drawing last year.

    One thing's for sure......until the drought totally turns around, the antegoat population in the SE corner of the state is going to be way down from historical levels.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Linefinder wrote: »
    I didn't even draw a tag last year, and the year before that the drought had moved all the goats well north of where I was hunting. We've had an unusually wet summer this year, though, and hopefully a lot of it fell on Kiowa county.

    But to show you how the drought has affected the area...................In previous years, they'd put out 600 doe tags for the draw, and usually have 300-400 "left over". Last year they put out only 300 tags, and I didn't draw. There were no leftovers. Same thing this year, only I drew. Probably because of the preference point I had for not drawing last year.

    One thing's for sure......until the drought totally turns around, the antegoat population in the SE corner of the state is going to be way down from historical levels.

    Mike

    Yikes - that is a tough situation. I really hope those rains show up soon. Prolonged drought is never a good thing for hunters or game. I'm still confident that you guys will get it done. Have a blast out there!
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 25,424 Senior Member
    I absolutely LOVE the smell of an antelope! It brings up childhood memories and transports me in memories to places I wish I was again.

    Darn near ear the greatest smell on earth.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
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