Hunting Style

beartrackerbeartracker Senior MemberPosts: 3,116 Senior Member
Post removed
«1

Replies

  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    Holier than thou ?

    I hunt cornfields up my way for bear

    I'll hunt water areas in a dry year

    don't you hunt power lines?

    aren't those man made shooting lanes for you?

    judge not lest you be judged
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    You don't have to be condescending, it is unbecoming of you.
    I'm not I am trying to point out what I see as hypocrocy in your thread.
    Yes, just not planted or baited ones.
    Do the deer come out to browse on them?
    If so your getting a food source not available in the regular woods you hunt and a shot not available also.
    You use of scripture does not apply here,....I disagree

    I was harsh hitiing a nerve on this one Mike


    the only way to hunt nor did I say any other way was wrong. Really?
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,966 Senior Member
    I wait for opening day and go where I hunted before; if nothing happens I walk around.
    The next time I go some other place and repeat.
    Sometimes look at new spots I have not been.
    We have 3 months for gun big game and 5 for small game, not including bow or black pwr; no need to get overly anxious.
    Sometimes I'm right, sometimes I bump into something, or sometimes I find a spot that needs further attention.
    Then, often I do not shoot anything.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 7,038 Senior Member
    I'm with you on plugging what amounts to a "farm animal", however. . .

    I just got back from a week in the local mountains hunting for mulies. We did a lot of stomping around, but also did a day of road hunting simply because Dad and I needed a rest and recovery day - don't feel bad about that in the slightest, even though both methods were equally unsuccessful this trip.

    I understand the viewpoint that spot-and-stalk is somehow "more sporting", and successfully doing it is certainly an impressive feat, but let's not kid ourselves - we've traded in the obsidian spears and arrows made by clan members for refined steel rifles made by some unknown group of people in a factory that could have been delivered by jet plane from the other side of the planet, topped it off with glass that's ground and assembled in the equivalent of a medical clean room, and fueled it with powder made in a massive chemical plant that can reach across entire zip codes. The modern bow isn't any less sophisticated. We hunt wearing synthetic clothing with origins just as complicated, communicate with radios, and navigate our hunting areas using signals beamed down from outer space. When you add all that up, what shame is there, really, in adding an automobile to the mix - especially when you consider that most of us aren't the 20-somethings that the typical cave man would have been, and that many of us may be rolling with arthritis, artificial joints, and a lengthy list of prescription meds? To say nothing of how you get that carcass out of the woods once it's down. . .

    You earn the Platinum Man Card with spears, atl-atls, and unsighted bows with no pulleys. Deduct Man Card points from there.

    Come to think of it, other than my own body, I think my '78 Land Cruiser is my oldest, most primitive piece of hunting equipment. . .
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    Man, would I ever like to start this thread over,
    sounds good....LOL
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    Man, would I ever like to start this thread over,
    sounds good....LOL
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    Wambli there is a HUUUUUGE difference watching baits for cats then sitting over a feeder. Huge. Massive. Enormous difference.

    The bait for cats is actually about 7-20 baits (that you yourself normally hunt, shoot, and pay for as a taken trophy) hung up. You hang them, then most likely the camp PH apprentice spends days driving back and forth (these are often several to dozens of miles apart) to check to feeding, tracks and possible size estimations. 1 of 12 baits might get hit, and it could be a small cat or a hyena or a jackal. You have NO idea if the cat is going to be there the night you are. Only a few outfits use game cams, its not real popular, and those that due are usually doing it because of a lack of staff to check baits, or a short window hunt which means no time to sit on a bait for a week or two hoping a tom comes back.

    Deer feeders are different, and most know here I also don't agree with them. If that is how someone wants to collect wild meat, that is fine by me, I just don't want to hear it called hunting. Those deer/hogs are trained to that feeder. When it goes off, game comes running. Its a Pavlovian response, they are conditioned over months/years to know this spot = food. Then, you just sit there in a blind 50 yards away with pre cut shooting lanes and wait. If that is what it takes to get your deer, again, its legal, I have no problems. I just don't want to hear about how hard that "hunt" was, tell us about your great shoot or harvest.

    edited to add : JerryBobCo and Linefinder and their bison are a perfect example of that last sentence in the paragraph above. They shot some bison, had a great time, got hundreds of pounds of awesome meet, and shared some great pics with us. They made it VERY clear this was not a "hunt". It was a shoot.

    Using power lines, water holes, so on and so forth, is to your advantage and that is fine. The power lines aren't made to attract and condition game, water holes are what they are, water holes. They hunt over them here and in Africa. That is fine, again use it to your advantage. But a man made, man placed, man filled, and man timed feeder, is a different story. Not being sanctimonious here or looking down my nose. I'm hopefully doing this same thing in Feb with some friends, sitting over a feeder to shoot a hog. My odds are near guaranteed by the outfit, and they have several feeders with cams and such set up. I'm going there to SHOOT something, and reap the benefits by bringing home some tasty meat. They offer real spot and stalk hunts as well, and I might opt for a 2nd pig and do it this way, but I won't call feeder watching the "hunt". If I do the spot and stalk, that'll be a hunt.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    I hope you accept my apology
    I'm kind of a sledgehammer type of guy
    My apologies back to you Mike.

    Does this mean you don't want to come up this way after bears?
    I'll let you use a knife
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    Forgot to add, I also do not consider placing a stand/blind over a game trail the same thing as baiting. Luck of the draw or usually weeks/months of watching that trail to know who and what comes through. That is using nature to your advantage
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    I started hunting big game in the west, spot-n-stalk, and it is still my favorite.
    I have hunted over wheat, corn, and alfalfa fields, and have hunted out of blinds, elevated, and ground blinds-natural cover.
    I have also hunted near corn that was poured out or by a feeder-not often.
    I still-hunt on occasion. I have taken one animal in a fenced hunt. Fun, but not challenging.
    Some areas because of heavy cover, limit ones ability to hunt but a few way.
    I use calling when I think it works as well.
    IF it is legal, and you enjoy it-go get em!
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    Wambli there is a HUUUUUGE difference watching baits for cats then sitting over a feeder. Huge. Massive. Enormous difference.

    No there is not. Not one thread of difference. You are taking a source of attraction that was NOT at that location and placing it there in an advantageous maner to the hunter. You are providing a 'draw' to the animal you seek. A feeder does that. A hippo quarter does that. Food is food. Absolutely no difference. Again, you are providing a source of attraction in both situations.
    Just because you put the bait out doesn't mean the animal you seek will come. The male lion you want may never show. The big buck you want may never arrive. Does, lionesses, smaller males, or nothing at all may arrive. No garuntee the particular game you seek is actually going to arrive when the person is there. In either situation.

    Deer feeders are different, and most know here I also don't agree with them. If that is how someone wants to collect wild meat, that is fine by me, I just don't want to hear it called hunting. Those deer/hogs are trained to that feeder. When it goes off, game comes running. Its a Pavlovian response, they are conditioned over months/years to know this spot = food. Then, you just sit there in a blind 50 yards away with pre cut shooting lanes and wait. If that is what it takes to get your deer, again, its legal, I have no problems. I just don't want to hear about how hard that "hunt" was, tell us about your great shoot or harvest.

    See the above about what might show up. Bait is bait.

    Using power lines, water holes, so on and so forth, is to your advantage and that is fine. The power lines aren't made to attract and condition game, water holes are what they are, water holes. They hunt over them here and in Africa. That is fine, again use it to your advantage. But a man made, man placed, man filled, and man timed feeder, is a different story.

    If it's there already, you capitalize on it. If it's NOT there and you put it there, that's just forward planning. In some instances, such as water, you are benefiting the whole spectrum of animals by providing sustinance. Same way as food in some areas.

    In YOUR mind, there is a difference. In reality, there is none. Again, you are providing something that is not naturally there. You are attracting the game. Lion or deer, it's an attractant. Food or water, it's an attractant. Man made or natural, it's an attractant. Calling, scenting.......attractant.

    We all have our preferred methods. We all have our likes and dislikes.

    I know that I prefer spot and stalk hunting. I like still hunting in brushier areas. I like calling and rattling. After that, I don't mind sitting and watching a likely area in the event of something showing up. My least favorite method is sitting over bait. But I've done it. Usually to cull game or provide the kids a chance to see lots of animals and maybe take the one we want. To experience a kill. But I don't prefer it. It's boring to me but the kids like all the activity.

    I DO NOT like high fences! But I have helped cull lots of does and hogs in such ranches. Never shot an antlered animal in one though. Just don't have the desire. Just my quirk. Oh well. Not to mention, I can't afford a hunt like that and if I could, I probably wouldn't pay it. Again, just me.

    So MHS, when you really look at it, no matter your reasoning in your head, there is absolutely no difference. Even though you prefer one over the other. You are, in reality, trying to justify your prefference. One may be harder than ther other, but that probably has more to do with game density than the act of baiting.
    "....the true general purpose big-game cartridges used in this country come in but two calibers, .30 and 7mm. (the .270 Win. is merely a slightly aberrant 7mm whose bullets are .007" undersize.) -Finn Aagaard - American Rifleman, December 1986
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    I disagree. Deer and hogs become conditioned over months/years to a feed station. That is NOT the same thing as hanging random baits hoping you attract a cat. They are not conditioned to find those baits, they are opportunistic feedings. If you randomly scattered some corn and hoped a deer found it, THAT is the same thing. Using man installed machines that attract animals just by the sound, is not the same thing. Lions and leopards are attracted by the smell of rotting flesh, not by a literal dinner bell. Not only are they conditioned to respond to the sound, a lot of feeders are set up on timers! Come on, you KNOW animals are going to show up right around 745am, because that is when you set the time up on your feeder. Harvesting is just fine, collecting meat is just fine, I just hate when people say its hunting.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    And I have no intention or desire to ever hunt cats anyways, so that doesn't play on my wanting to justify anything about the specific statement I was making.

    Anyone can say what they want, I will never consider sitting on feeders "hunting". Its shooting. I have zero problem with someone doing that, I even stated I'll be hopefully doing the same thing in Feb for hogs. But, I am not calling it a hunt because it is not.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    I disagree. Deer and hogs become conditioned over months/years to a feed station. That is NOT the same thing as hanging random baits hoping you attract a cat. They are not conditioned to find those baits, they are opportunistic feedings. If you randomly scattered some corn and hoped a deer found it, THAT is the same thing. Using man installed machines that attract animals just by the sound, is not the same thing. Lions and leopards are attracted by the smell of rotting flesh, not by a literal dinner bell.
    So a nose is ok and an ear is not? When the lion smells the flesh, he knows it means food and will seek it out. This is alright? But, when the deer hears the feeder and seeks out the source, it's not ok? In either case, you are stimulating their senses. You are attracting them. Water does the same thing. Or food placed on the ground in the same place. Yes, they learn that there is often food in a certain area. I've read that baits are hung in the same trees because it is a good spot and has produced in the past. Isn't this kinda similar. It's bait, Dude. It's an attractant. You stimulate the senses. It's the same thing. I know you really dream of Africa but you can't overlook facts is facts. You are baiting a lion just like you are baiting a deer. You won't believe me because you don't want to. I'm cool with that. But you love the idea of Africa so much you are willing to be wrong to accept your preference. Simple as that. No big deal. We justify what we like.
    "....the true general purpose big-game cartridges used in this country come in but two calibers, .30 and 7mm. (the .270 Win. is merely a slightly aberrant 7mm whose bullets are .007" undersize.) -Finn Aagaard - American Rifleman, December 1986
  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    By the way, I'm not defending feeders. I don't like sitting on them. I have and likely will. As I said, to cull and get meat. Sure. When I'm serious about hunting, I prefer other methods. All I'm doing is dispelling your arguement that baiting a lion is hunting and feeding a deer is not. They are both bating. If I hang a feeder in a tree for a week to kill a deer it's the same as hanging a quarter in a tree for a week to shoot a lion.
    "....the true general purpose big-game cartridges used in this country come in but two calibers, .30 and 7mm. (the .270 Win. is merely a slightly aberrant 7mm whose bullets are .007" undersize.) -Finn Aagaard - American Rifleman, December 1986
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,027 Senior Member
    So calling and rattling is an attractant as well
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,545 Senior Member
    What about hunting with a paid guide or outfitter? Does that make the hunt any less fair than a do it yourself hunt? And what about paying big bucks to shoot big bucks on private land as opposed to hunting public land that's crawling with other hunters?

    If you start out with every intention of hunting only on foot, and just happen to stumble across a shootable animal while driving to/from camp, do you jump out and shoot it, or do you pass on it because it would amount to road hunting?

    There's all kinds of criteria one can use to make the distinction between hunting and shooting. When you start judging the criteria that others use, you'd be best off to remember the old adage about pointing fingers. It goes something like this.

    When you point your finger at someone, remember that there are 4 pointing back at you.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    BPsniper wrote: »
    By the way, I'm not defending feeders. I don't like sitting on them. I have and likely will. As I said, to cull and get meat. Sure. When I'm serious about hunting, I prefer other methods. All I'm doing is dispelling your arguement that baiting a lion is hunting and feeding a deer is not. They are both bating. If I hang a feeder in a tree for a week to kill a deer it's the same as hanging a quarter in a tree for a week to shoot a lion.

    That is the key there, as long as people say what you said I have no problems with it.

    And I don't see how me wanting to hunt plains game in africa, has anything to do with what we are discussing, I already said I don't have any intentions on cats, so its a moot point to keep making gestures at something I'd like to do someday saying I'm justifying it just because, I'd love to hunt on the same continent that people bait cats on.

    We don't have to agree, which is fine, but you'll never convince me they are the same thing. Meat is what lions eat, you put it there and yes, use their senses to attract them to hopefully get a shot. Commercially prepared game feed isn't what deer would normally eat, set on a permanent spot, with timers, so that game comes to the same spot ever time that feeder goes off, just isn't the same.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,414 Senior Member
    I hunt deer from a blind in Texas. Why? Because the brush is too thick for an effective stalk, we even tried it one year. It simply is not realistic in that thick brush. Maybe if I used a handgun and was able to scout out the area a few times before, but even then I'd probably just be able to find a place in the brush that the deer passed by, sit, wait, and shoot one from 5 feet away.

    I would love to spot n stalk, and I'm hoping in Colorado next year and maybe New Mexico I'll be able to give it a try.

    I also don't oppose to guided hunts. For me to go hunt Moose, Caribou, Africa, etc, I don't have the funds to go ahead of time and scout out and learn the lay of the land. With a guide who knows what he's doing, I can get pointers that I would not have had otherwise. I PERSONALLY would rather hunt alone, but if I don't know what I'm doing it's a pointless pursuit.
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "It's far easier to start out learning to be precise and then speeding up, than it is having never "mastered" the weapon, and trying to be precise." - Dan C
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    What about hunting with a paid guide or outfitter? Does that make the hunt any less fair than a do it yourself hunt? And what about paying big bucks to shoot big bucks on private land as opposed to hunting public land that's crawling with other hunters?

    I think that all depends Jerry! If you are paying to sit over a timed feeder with guaranteed success, well, everyone knows my opinion now. Do I think there is a little something "extra" about doing it on your own on public land with everyone else in the county? Heck yes! I did a semi-guided hunt last year, and yes it was easier then hunting on my own, it was great to have someone who knew the property and knew the habits of antelope much more so then I. We all know how that ended up for me. This year, I did pay for private access in a good area, but it was not guided. Granted it wasn't what I expected at all, but it wasn't a fish in barrel situation. Now saying that....the 10k private fenced ranch hunts where you get to select your "trophy" from a catalog of predetermined animals based on their size and the price you can afford...no, not the same. I also don't agree with the "Spider Bull" issue either. That outfitter had teams of guys literally following that bulls every move all summer, and when it was time to hunt the guy paid enough to buy a house to basically be dropped right on top of the bull and shot it. Not hunting.

    If you start out with every intention of hunting only on foot, and just happen to stumble across a shootable animal while driving to/from camp, do you jump out and shoot it, or do you pass on it because it would amount to road hunting?
    Not sure why brought up this point, and I don't see the connection to the feeders, but if you see an animal you want to take on your way to the field, what is wrong with that? I didn't knock guys sitting on stands over game trails, or near water holes, so why would I have a problem with a shot of opportunity. That, is exactly what it is, an opportunity. Now if a guy was on his way to his timed deer attracting stand because he knew certain animals would be making their way their soon, stumbles across an animal on the way, its the same thing. That animal was answering his dinner bell, it was a shot of opportunity and I'll be happy to call that one a hunt. My beef is once he inside the blind watching the clock to see how long until the feeder goes off knowing game WILL be coming, calling it more then going out to get his meat.


    I'm not saying anything is right/wrong, so I don't know why people are getting defensive about it, I just say call it what it is. Jerry up above I mentioned you and Mike with the bison because I remember when you posted about that like 2 forum changes ago, you called it what it was : a fun day with friends shooting a bison to get meat.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    Maybe if I used a handgun and was able to scout out the area a few times before, but even then I'd probably just be able to find a place in the brush that the deer passed by, sit, wait, and shoot one from 5 feet away.



    I also don't oppose to guided hunts. For me to go hunt Moose, Caribou, Africa, etc, I don't have the funds to go ahead of time and scout out and learn the lay of the land. With a guide who knows what he's doing, I can get pointers that I would not have had otherwise. I PERSONALLY would rather hunt alone, but if I don't know what I'm doing it's a pointless pursuit.

    Ok dude, you are just baiting us to enable you now. Go start looking at hunting handguns :devil:

    As for the guides in the situations you mentioned, sometimes it is just not an option. There are some places/hunts the require by law a professional guide. There are DIY options for lots of animals, including some DG in one particular country in Africa...can't remember which one, but its rather new to the modern hunting game...its one of the more northern/central recently war ravaged countries. But anyways, a lot of hunts require it by law. How YOU put into and how much you want to be spoon fed, is all personal and the guides will usually ask you specifically how you want things to go down, after all you are the customer.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,414 Senior Member
    Ok dude, you are just baiting us to enable you now. Go start looking at hunting handguns :devil:

    I already know what I want, Ruger Redhawk in .45 Colt, I'm just waiting for one to show up.
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "It's far easier to start out learning to be precise and then speeding up, than it is having never "mastered" the weapon, and trying to be precise." - Dan C
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,545 Senior Member
    I already know what I want, Ruger Redhawk in .45 Colt, I'm just waiting for one to show up.

    Don't you mean .45 LOOOOOOOOOONGGGGGGGGGGGG Colt?
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,414 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    Don't you mean .45 LOOOOOOOOOONGGGGGGGGGGGG Colt?

    No, I can't handle that one... I'll have to settle for the .45 Looong Colt, and I'll probably shoot .45 Short Pony in it for the most part.
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "It's far easier to start out learning to be precise and then speeding up, than it is having never "mastered" the weapon, and trying to be precise." - Dan C
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,768 Senior Member
    Wambli, I had something to say with your post because you actually helped make my point, but I'm done with this thread. Personal digs and stuff that has nothing to do with what I said just isn't going to get anywhere and its arguing for the sake of arguing.

    I'm out.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    Where is the sniping? Where are the personal digs? I certainly didn't mean to do so. If you feel I did, it was a misunderstanding. I'm not arguing the methods one uses. I know what I prefer and what I don't. I don't like hunting over feeders for deer. But I'll do it if that's what I'm told to do. In the same token, I prefer to hunt over a cut field for dove. Just more action. So, am I hypocritical? No, I just like different methods. But baiting is baiting, period. I can't say baiting for deer is wrong, even if I don't like it. Then turn around and say dove hunting over a fresh cut field is right. Though, actual "baiting" migratory birds is illegal, natural spillage during agriculture is ok. In either case, there is food on the ground that attracts game. Baiting is baiting.
    "....the true general purpose big-game cartridges used in this country come in but two calibers, .30 and 7mm. (the .270 Win. is merely a slightly aberrant 7mm whose bullets are .007" undersize.) -Finn Aagaard - American Rifleman, December 1986
  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    Dove hunting over a man made stock tank. Baiting? It's not natural. It's a food source. I KNOW they will be there right before sunset and right at sunrise. Is this a wrong hunting method? I sure as He'll know I will be more successful there than I will in the middle of a dirt field. If I hunt over that stock tank full of water, is it really "hunting"?
    "....the true general purpose big-game cartridges used in this country come in but two calibers, .30 and 7mm. (the .270 Win. is merely a slightly aberrant 7mm whose bullets are .007" undersize.) -Finn Aagaard - American Rifleman, December 1986
  • BPsniperBPsniper Banned Posts: 1,961 Senior Member
    So calling and rattling is an attractant as well
    Yep. You are stimulating their senses and attracting them by an innate desire that they possess. To breed, to fight, to feed, to defend. So forth and so on. It's an attractant.
    "....the true general purpose big-game cartridges used in this country come in but two calibers, .30 and 7mm. (the .270 Win. is merely a slightly aberrant 7mm whose bullets are .007" undersize.) -Finn Aagaard - American Rifleman, December 1986
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,728 Senior Member
    IF it is legal, and you enjoy it-go get em!


    :that:

    I accept that there are many many ways of 'hunting'.......just as there are many reasons for hunting in a particular way, be it taking animals over bait, or stalking for miles with rifle in hand.

    What I think it boils down to is individual choice and individual ethics.
    Even then, individual choice sometimes is not applicable if the only hunting available is of a particular type, for example hunting over food plots.

    Each of us as 'Takers of Game' have our own ethics.

    I enjoy hunting as a form of recreation as well as a meat source. For me, its not about the size of the trophy, its about being out in the natural world, using my skills to put meat on the table and enjoying what god gave us.

    Planting a food plot/feeder/bait and attracting prey to it is not my preferred method of hunting but if it is yours, then far be it for me to impose my 'ethic' on you, provided what you do is within the law.
    The same way that sitting on a hill side with a specialised rig that can reach out beyond where I can see with the naked eye and killing an animal that does not have a clue it forms a major part of a sight picture through a high powered scope is not part of my 'ethic'.

    ( Although I admire those who have the skills necessary to do those things. And if I had the skills and confidence and the territory to do them, maybe I would choose to hunt that way, but I dont, so I dont )

    But thats just me.

    I like getting up close, pitting my skills against an animal where it can use its natural senses and 'taking it on' in its own territory.

    Like everything in life, we all make choices, some of which are based on what we can control and others which are based on circumstances where we only have partial control.

    Having a 'Holier than Thou' mindset when it comes to hunting is not conducive to retaining our chosen sport when we are under attack from all types of people who want to ban what we enjoy.

    In my view, the only 'rule/ethic' I think that should apply to hunting is that we all respect the intended game and treat it accordingly.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • HondoHondo Member Posts: 320 Member
    MHS....I would be lying if I said you didn't touch a nerve with me. You did and I think you are wrong. Like Texas, Florida is thick brush country. You are not going to spot and stalk much here unless you are independantly wealthy and can afford a couple thousand acres. Using a tree stand or a ground blind is pretty much necessary. There are no bluffs for spotting game....it is flat and think land. On my lease we have 11 guys and 1700 acres, and 500+ in inaccessable.....can you say swamp?

    I guarantee you the feeder is not a dinner bell.....doesn't work like that. The feeder simply causes the deer/hogs to program their animal GPS to maybe swing by your place every now and then. Most of the time they come by at night and chow down. If I were in Colorado or some other place where it was more open then I would love to spot and stalk. Not happening here.

    Also , sitting in one spot can be harder. You are limited to 50-150 yds of real estate. You can go a whole season and not get a shot.

    The part that got me the most was the part that "it isn't hunting." I did not appreciate that at all. We work very hard in the off-season just make us able to have a possibility of getting a shot.....maybe. If everywhere in America was like Colorado you MAY have a point. But it isn't. If you were here you would use a stand and feeder......or you probably wouldn't get much, if any, game. I know there are people that have places that they may leave alone for a LONG time and know when the hogs come in....and where. True, that may be harvesting and not hunting. Most people do not have that luxury. But to say I am not a hunter because I do what we have to is TOTALLY wrong.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.