Carrying / Cleaning

twatwa Senior MemberPosts: 2,231 Senior Member
Just curious as to how often do you inspect / clean your carry weapons? I find myself pocket carrying a bodyguard .380 Smith a majority of the time these days. The dust bunnies catch up quick, it has become habit to grab the can of air here at work a couple times a week and blow it out, including the spare mag I keep in my other pocket. It seems to have worked fine by the range sessions I have had with gun as of late. Just wondering how often others inspect or clean their carry guns to ensure function ability.

Replies

  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 9,450 Senior Member
    Not nearly as much as I should!
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,887 Senior Member
    When I see that it needs to be cleaned.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    As needed.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • tubabucknuttubabucknut Banned Posts: 3,520 Senior Member
    jbp-ohio wrote: »
    Not nearly as much as I should!
    :that:
    It's because I hate Trump.
  • bobbyrlf3bobbyrlf3 Senior Member Posts: 2,465 Senior Member
    After every training session.
    Knowledge is essential to living freely and fully; understanding gives knowledge purpose and strength; wisdom is combining the two and applying them appropriately in words and actions.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,037 Senior Member
    Almost never...guilty. I'm not big on cleaning guns, so "every once in a while" would be the closest answer.

    I know at least two people who clean their guns after each use. This includes .22 rifles (not a carry weapon, but there it is.) I'm astounded by this, especially since .22s seem to shoot better with use. When I was shooting PPC, back on the Old Days, a barrel would lead from shooting lead wadcutters, and we used a Lewis Lead Remover.

    But a jacketed bullet doesn't leave anything harmful that I can tell. Too much oil acts as a dust magnet. If the action is dry, I oil it on an automatic, but a revolver? You have to take off the side plate, and I don't do it.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,046 Senior Member
    It's not hard to oil a revolver. Cock the hammer, drip 5 drops of oil into the action at the base of the hammer where it meshes with the trigger. Cycle the action 6 times or so, you're done.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,037 Senior Member
    It's not hard to oil a revolver. Cock the hammer, drip 5 drops of oil into the action at the base of the hammer where it meshes with the trigger. Cycle the action 6 times or so, you're done.

    Works once, but if you do this say once a month, you wind up with 60 drops of oil in your revolver at the end of the year. Instead of going away, oil ages and forms a scale. Kinda like a minor version of grease. I don't see the problem of not over-oiling in a revolver. It's not like you're going to shoot it like an automatic that requires and is easier to lube.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 4,422 Senior Member
    EDC rig? The only time I clean them (as in disassemble) is before I go to the range. When I'm done with the range trip, I figure if it fired the last time I pulled the trigger, it'll fire the next time I pull the trigger. And with a carry gun, IMO, the next shot is the most important one.

    If I take it to the range and it works flawlessly, stripping it down to clean it afterwards opens up the possibility that something didn't go back together "just right", and if it just goes snap with the next trigger pull, I'm probably gonna be in deep dookey.

    I blow out dust bunnies with compressed air every couple months, but for the most part, that's about it. Unless I know I'm going to the range the next day. Then, I'll do a deep clean.

    Mike
    Decisions have consequences, not everything in life gets an automatic mulligan.
    KSU Firefighter
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,046 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    Works once, but if you do this say once a month, you wind up with 60 drops of oil in your revolver at the end of the year. Instead of going away, oil ages and forms a scale. Kinda like a minor version of grease. I don't see the problem of not over-oiling in a revolver. It's not like you're going to shoot it like an automatic that requires and is easier to lube.
    Oh, I'm not saying oil it every month. Maybe once, twice a year at most. Or if the action gets sluggish.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,046 Senior Member
    Oh, my cleaning regimen: every month or two. Boresnake as necessary. Even though I shoot a lot of lead bullets, the lube I use along with slug size and alloy doesn't lead up. The problem is that the bullet lube is kinda messy if you shoot a lot. Makes your handgun grungy. Doesn't cause ill effects, but it do get dirty.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,976 Senior Member
    I agree with Bream. On several occasions I picked up some of my SS S&W revolvers and noticed they were "Dry" and the cylinder release/latch took some force to release the cylinder. These are guns that have not been touched in months usually. A few drops of oil and some dry firing cures it.

    I also put a drop on the star plunger and the cylinder stop nub/button and exercise it with my finger and then wipe off any excess oil. Especially wipe off any the gets near the charge holes.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
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  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,046 Senior Member
    The lubing is not something I came up with.

    Read it in an article by Bob Milek.

    Unlike Big Chief I don't lube the ejector plunger. Too afraid the oil might attract powder fouling and cause issues.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,825 Senior Member
    twa wrote: »
    The dust bunnies catch up quick, it has become habit to grab the can of air here at work a couple times a week and blow it out, including the spare mag I keep in my other pocket.

    This....I hit my carry guns with the compressor a heck of a lot more often than I do any other cleaning chores...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    I dunno, was on a team, exclusively revolver LE at the time, S&W M-10 or Combat Masterpieces. with 6 inch barrels target sights etc custom made for the team, I liked it so much I had one approved for duty use.

    I never did much else but clean the dirty parts, cylinder & gap etc, never took off a sideplate unless something broke which is almost never on S&W revolvers, even old Victory models, wear and sputting lead from the cylinder gap was a common enough problem in my experience more than broken parts.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • EliEli Senior Member Posts: 3,074 Senior Member
    Linefinder wrote: »
    EDC rig? The only time I clean them (as in disassemble) is before I go to the range. When I'm done with the range trip, I figure if it fired the last time I pulled the trigger, it'll fire the next time I pull the trigger. And with a carry gun, IMO, the next shot is the most important one.

    If I take it to the range and it works flawlessly, stripping it down to clean it afterwards opens up the possibility that something didn't go back together "just right", and if it just goes snap with the next trigger pull, I'm probably gonna be in deep dookey.

    The only time I detail strip a gun is if I know that I'm going to be heading to the range the next day. And even just a field strip and quick wipe down/re-lubing happens once I'm at the range, before I start shooting. The only time I ever clean a gun AFTER shooting, is when I fire corrosive ammo.

    As far as how often....I generally clean my guns after every couple thousand rounds or so, whether they need it or not. Speaking of which....my carry gun has almost 3k through it since the last time I cleaned it......welp, guess I need to head to the range in the next few days. :tooth:
  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,243 Senior Member
    I've cleaned all of my guns at least once. I hated it and try to avoid such silliness.
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