Who has a Marlin 336 in .35 Remington?

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Replies

  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,794 Senior Member
    Got the buttstock finished and back on the rifle. I still need to make a filler for the rear sight slot, and do a little touch up bluing in a few places, but it's ready to sight in as is. Still not bad for $160, and the barrel bore cleaned up nice, and the barrel crown is undamaged. It was shot little and neglected much.

    Marlin33635Rem021_zps8768484e.jpg

    New sights.

    Marlin33635Rem020_zpsacd7779f.jpg


    Yes, that's a stainless steel screw in the barrel/magazine band. I have a pack of screws on order to fit it with the proper blued screw. This is an old style rifle and the screw for the new ones DOES NOT interchange. The old style screw is #5-40 tpi, and that screw happens to be about as common as passenger pigeons. So I ordered a pack of 36 that are on the long side, and will cut one down to length when they get here.
    Marlin33635Rem019_zps08a0dde4.jpg
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • JeeperJeeper Senior Member Posts: 2,952 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Not me, I hand load them. The flex tip really aren't anymore expensive than any other quality bullet.

    Agreed. Even in Factory ammo, it's not that much more than any other quality round IMHO. More to the point, it turns a 150 yd gun into a valid 200 yd gun. The ballistics of the .30-30, .45-70, and .44 mag, especially stand out IMHO.

    Luis
    Wielding the Hammer of Thor first requires you to lift and carry the Hammer of Thor. - Bigslug
  • JeeperJeeper Senior Member Posts: 2,952 Senior Member
    BigDanS wrote: »
    I have been hanging out at the Marlin Owners Board over the past few months and it is a great group and really well informed.

    Since I am wading into the Marlin collecting waters, and recently purchased a Rem-lin 45-70 in stainless vs a JM marked gun built in 2008, I see substantial differences. I took the lever out of the Rem-lin and one side is only partially finished that is inside the gun. I assume this is a "doesn't matter" area. The wood is not nearly as nice, and the metal finished edges are not as eased as the other guns. It shoots well, the Rem-Lin has a 6.5 lb trigger, the Marlin a 5 lb trigger.

    I would prefer a JM marked gun based on this experience.


    D

    Agreed. Price dependent of course.

    Luis
    Wielding the Hammer of Thor first requires you to lift and carry the Hammer of Thor. - Bigslug
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,794 Senior Member
    Jeeper wrote: »
    Agreed. Price dependent of course.

    Luis

    My .35 Rem. is JM marked, as is my .30-30. :tooth:
    I don't know if my .38-55 octagon barreled Cowboy model is JM marked or not. But it has Ballard rifling, so I don't mind one way or the other.
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 8,528 Senior Member
    Nice work Tennmike
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,794 Senior Member
    Diver43 wrote: »
    Nice work Tennmike

    Thanks! I checked the SN code and it was made in 1969. Not bad for a 45 year old rifle. Kind of ironic, too, in that it was made the year after GCA '68 went into effect.
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,066 Senior Member
    BigDanS wrote: »
    I have been hanging out at the Marlin Owners Board over the past few months and it is a great group and really well informed.

    Since I am wading into the Marlin collecting waters, and recently purchased a Rem-lin 45-70 in stainless vs a JM marked gun built in 2008, I see substantial differences. I took the lever out of the Rem-lin and one side is only partially finished that is inside the gun. I assume this is a "doesn't matter" area. The wood is not nearly as nice, and the metal finished edges are not as eased as the other guns. It shoots well, the Rem-Lin has a 6.5 lb trigger, the Marlin a 5 lb trigger.

    I would prefer a JM marked gun based on this experience.

    D

    There was a time where the Remlins were not very good rifles. I've seen them, like seven years ago, that were awful...saw one with the front sight non-centered.

    But lately, so I hear, they're a lot better. The JM is just a stamp. My shooting buddy has a Westernfield 30-30 that was made in about 1978 or so, and it's marked "P". He preferred it, since it has a forend cap and not a barrel band. I had one of these, an excellent rifle.

    Not to lessen the JM marked guns, but to point out it's not the final word in Marlin rifles. Some of them, for whatever reason, lack the magic JM. Maybe it was over looked. Finally, it all depends on workmanship rather than a roll stamp. As I said, I have two and have never looked at the barrel stamp. I assume they're marked, but don't care and if not, (made in 1976) that's OK, too.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • Farm Boy DeuceFarm Boy Deuce Senior Member Posts: 6,083 Senior Member
    Very nice work Mike.
    I am afraid we forget sometime that the basic and simple things brings us the most pleasure.
    Dad 5-31-13
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,794 Senior Member
    Very nice work Mike.

    Thanks! I like old rifles. The wood on this one is pretty plain, but I've been on the hunt for a Marlin in .35 Rem. for a while. I'll correct the gap around the top tang when I get the time. That gap is what causes stock splits.
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • Farm Boy DeuceFarm Boy Deuce Senior Member Posts: 6,083 Senior Member
    I love old rifles, I have three or four waiting for me to get off my ass. I am still kicking myself for passing on a Marlin 336 SC
    I am afraid we forget sometime that the basic and simple things brings us the most pleasure.
    Dad 5-31-13
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,066 Senior Member
    Good looking rifle! You got a bargain on that one.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    OOPS! Isn't that why they make a B F H ?
    :tooth:
    Jerry

    Why was your dog giving you a raspberry in that picture ? What did you do to him ? lol !
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,794 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    Good looking rifle! You got a bargain on that one.

    You're seeing the after pictures. The before rifle was pretty sad. Along with neglect to wood and metal, it had a really cheesy scope on it with those see-through mounts. I bought it with full knowledge that I might have to replace the barrel. I put a bore light to it while I was inspecting it, and the bore was full of crud; I may have given it its first ever cleaning. I lucked out on that part, as the barrel was really good inside. The sides of the upper tang had some nasty pitting and rust. I took care of that with some full strength CLR(thanks, CPJ) applied with a Q-Tip and followed up with Oxpho Blue creme to get a good even bluing.
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


  • Farm Boy DeuceFarm Boy Deuce Senior Member Posts: 6,083 Senior Member
    As I recall from cpj's adventure the CLR took it to bare metal. Blueing being a type of rust...
    I am afraid we forget sometime that the basic and simple things brings us the most pleasure.
    Dad 5-31-13
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 25,794 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Cool! When you use CLR, do you have to republish the metal? In other words, if you are just removing the old blue from polished steel, does it dull the finish?

    The ONLY place I use CLR on one is where there is some serious pitting and rust scabs on top. I did use a stainless steel brush for initial cleanup after washing off the CLR, and some 400 grit paper to lightly polish the areas before rebluing. The rust was on the sides of the tang and covered by the wood, so I didn't spend a lot of time trying to get it back to a high polish. If you DO use CLR to remove rust on a firearm, when washing off the CLR, use HOT soapy water to get it all washed out and use a coarse rag (like heavy denim) and a toothbrush. An initial brushing with a stainless steel brush, or chore boy pad to get off any crusty residue. CLR leaves high carbon steel with a white finish that needs removal; it's a thin finish and isn't hard to remove.

    I've tinkered with the CLR on old high carbon tools like diagonal cutters, nippers, and even just scrap pieces to find out how to remove the residue and prepare the metal for bluing. I have some tools that I blued as test subjects, and once they were washed and polished, they took bluing well.
    Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.


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