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Plans for Thanksgiving & Christmas? meals, travel, hunting, etc?

samzheresamzhere BannedPosts: 10,923 Senior Member
We're staying around the house for the holidays. Long distance travel isn't in our stamina driving zone and flying is too pricey for just a visit. My two stepsons and my nephew (living in Hannibal Mo, Oregon City, and KC Mo respectively) all plan to come down here for a few days in the spring, so that will be fine. I've got a very small family and my girlfriend's is nearly as small.

So... Thanksgiving we're going to a big friendly outdoor tavern where they have an annual potluck. We're taking a couple of "gourmet" pies and some other stuff. This tavern is like an extended family (similar to the forum here), and several of the folks will fire up their smokers, so we'll have ham and turkey plus BBQ, and the tables will be laden with all sorts of goodies.

I've mentioned this before, but some years ago there was an article in the AP about bars and taverns hosting holiday potlucks. With our modern society being so spread out these days, and of course with economics a factor, many people just don't do the traditional "over the river to grandma's house" (if that ever was traditional anyway -- most of the Currier & Ives sort of old time New England holiday is of course an image of the imagination). And with "empty nest" families, people either dine alone as couples or go to large hotel buffet service. And many nowadays do the tavern thing.

Regardless, both my girlfriend's and my family are now smaller and widely dispersed. So we're having our Thanksgiving at a friendly tavern. Which sounds commercialized but in fact it's a great fun time, everyone pretty much knows each other and there are jokes and funny stories all afternoon.

After Thanksgiving, my girlfriend will be spending about a week at her sister's house in Pasadena (a suburb of Houston). The sis is in failing health and my gf will graciously help her and her good-fer-nuttin hubbie clean the house and do shopping. A thankless task but I really admire my gf for this outreach.

Tomorrow, Wednesday, she's also going down to the VA hospital here to help the long-term patients have a little moving around and chatting. She'll spend the whole day there and again I am happy that I've got a lady in my life who's caring and loving. Lord knows I need that, ha ha.

Christmas will be a fairly religious time for us. At my gf's church (a large Methodist church near downtown Houston) they'll be presenting Handel's "Messiah" with members of the Houston philharmonic and Houston professional chorale. When I was singing semi-pro baritone I've sung Messiah there and now we're gonna be spectators.

Then at my church, a very "high church" Episcopal (high church means incense, formal liturgy, sanctus bells, formal mass, etc) there will be a choral eucharist and carol service for Christmas Eve.

I'm fine with celebrating Thanksgiving with a fairly boisterous party. It's after all mostly a secular holiday. But Christmas? That's when the real spirit is seen and I tend to focus on the church. Nonetheless we'll have a nice dinner somewhere, maybe an upscale French restaurant. And yes, I'll tip lots to the folks who are working that day.

So... you traveling or staying put? Got any traditional hunting or other type of outdoor stuff? Family feast or dining with a small gathering? Or, as I remember back when I worked as an ASCP clinical med tech, do you work the holidays?

And later, of course, post any fun pics of the family gatherings, okay?
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Replies

  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,914 Senior Member
    Regular Thanksgiving for us, doing a turkey with apple & sausage dressing, cranberry relish, sweet taters, mashed potatoes with giblet gravy...the door will be open for them that want to stop in and stuff their face...

    We'll be having an abbreviated Christmas as Kelli is heading to MI to be present for the birth of grand-baby #8. I'll be driving up after New Year....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Not sure on Christmas, but thanksgiving I'm cooking a prime rib roast, taters, and oyster dressing.
    Then Sunday we are going to my mother In laws house to eat some crappy meal that everyone with no taste buds (everyone but me)thinks is good.

    Years ago when I grew up in KC, my mom had, count 'em, 3 other sisters who also lived in the city, so they'd rotate the Thanksgiving dinner. All were Kentucky country gals and so they were superb cooks.

    However, the 3 other sisters had teatotaler families, which my Dad would grow restless during, particularly after, for the football games. By then I lived on my own, and I'd swing by the family feed, and in the car, I'd take a pint of bottled in bond premium bourbon. Then my dad, my 2 cousins, and I would sit in the car and have a "snack", then go back inside and watch the game.
  • USUFBUSUFB Senior Member Posts: 830 Senior Member
    Rig move is scheduled for tomorrow morning, and I have to be there to make sure the spud load is unloaded correctly- not in the morning, but at 1600. Then I get to lead the truck driver back to the old location to transfer the rest of the chemicals. The transfer will take at least two, and probably three loads. Oh, did I mention the two locations are close to thirty miles apart? If I'm lucky, we'll be done around 0200-0300. I'll get a couple hours sleep in my truck, wake up, run my tests, pass out reports, send an email, and get out around 0700. Then I'll probably just crash at my parent's house until the big lunch around 2 PM. Cowboys game to follow.
    Sometimes, I lie awake in bed at night wondering "Why the heck can't I fall asleep?"
    NRA Life Member
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    We will do a traditional Thanksgiving meal at our house for family and friends who will bring side dishes and desserts - usually somewhere between 30 and 50 people. I'm smoking a 20 lb. turkey after Mrs. Bisley brines it. She's baking another 10 pounder to make the cornbread dressing every body really comes for - fresh sage and herbs to her specifications. Then, Saturday, we will check my mother out of the nursing home and drive up to my sister's for her Thanksgiving family dinner.

    Christmas will be several days of over-eating and 'spirits,' probably a prime rib roast on Christmas Day, since everybody raved about it last year - it will be much more expensive this year with high beef prices, but we won't be buying expensive presents this year. Lots of home-made candy, hot chocolate, and egg nog. Lots of kids, so lots of fun.
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    USUFB wrote: »
    Rig move is scheduled for tomorrow morning, and I have to be there to make sure the spud load is unloaded correctly etc etc.

    So is this a standard on-land rig? Tell us about the rig and whatever. My experience in drilling was mostly offshore, working on the design of jackup rigs. We worked some on semisubmersibles too. And of course our spud load calculations were all computer driven. Nevertheless it's a tough job because the startup needs to be as high as possible (for speed) within all safety and regulation guidelines.

    For those who don't know the term "spud" or "spud load" -- no, it's not how many baked taters you can put into foil and on the coals before they chill out the fire, ha ha.

    When a drilling site is first started, it's called "spudding" -- the first actual drilling begun at that site, whether offshore or onshore. Calculating proper spud load is a critical part of any drilling startup and someone who's good at this job can command good money. Or, in our company's case, good money for the software that did this.

    There's a gazillion separate jobs and actions that go into drilling a gas or oil well. Movies would have you think that you just look up into the sky, say, "Let's drill this dude!" and about 3 hours later, a gusher. Immediately after the gusher, there's either a victory dance or a fistfight, or both.

    The truth is that modern drilling, even small wildcat operations, is highly complex. Just one thing... the drilling "mud" isn't mud at all -- it's a finely tuned polymer based compound that may resemble a mud slurry but the drilling mud is quite expensive. It's specially formulated for various depths and types of rigs, filtered and cleaned and recycled, and carefully monitored. The way it works is that the "mud" is forced down the inside of the drill pipe, and its pressure is used to spin the drill bit. Then the mud flows outside the pipe and returns up the outside of the pipe. If you get a blockage or stoppage in the mud, you can quickly burn out a very expensive drill bit, that then has to be removed and replaced, during which you've got to pull the entire drill string, pipe section at a time. That's known as "tripping" and that itself is expensive and totally lost time during a drill sequence.

    US has a fascinating but tough job.
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    We will do a traditional Thanksgiving meal at our house

    bis, that sounds great! You already know this, but cherish each moment you have your family and friends nearby, especially at a holiday. Those memories are irreplaceable. There may come a time you'll look back at the fun and laughter and good food and cherish those things. Be sure to take plenty of photos.
  • Make_My_DayMake_My_Day Senior Member Posts: 7,669 Senior Member
    We're going to my Step-daughter's house. They are making a regular roasted turkey and a deep-fried one...should be yummy, plus wife is making a sweet potato pie with marshmallows on it and a dark chocolate cake with whipped marshmallow frosting. Mmmm, can't wait.
    JOE MCCARTHY WAS RIGHT:
    THE DEMOCRATS ARE THE NEW COMMUNISTS!
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    We're going to my Step-daughter's house. They are making a regular roasted turkey and a deep-fried one...should be yummy, plus wife is making a sweet potato pie with marshmallows on it and a dark chocolate cake with whipped marshmallow frosting. Mmmm, can't wait.

    Please email a slice of the chocolate cake to me, okay? And it sounds like fun, and the fact that you're on good terms with the stepdaughter shows something.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    I'll be baking a Cornish game hen, making a pan of stuffing, bake a few sweet taters, make a pan of homemade rolls, open a can of corn and add some crispy bacon bits to it, and make a homemade apple pie. And when it's all done, pig out!
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Make_My_DayMake_My_Day Senior Member Posts: 7,669 Senior Member
    samzhere wrote: »
    Please email a slice of the chocolate cake to me, okay? And it sounds like fun, and the fact that you're on good terms with the stepdaughter shows something.
    LOL....will do that, Sam. The first couple of years were a bit rough, but all is good now.
    JOE MCCARTHY WAS RIGHT:
    THE DEMOCRATS ARE THE NEW COMMUNISTS!
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    LOL....will do that, Sam. The first couple of years were a bit rough, but all is good now.

    I realize that the cake needs to be sliced thin to get into the email but it's the thought that counts.

    And a small hint to others -- there are annoying public message commercials about this, but they're true -- if you've got any animosity with a family member, try to find a way to patch it up, at least somewhat. You don't necessarily have to become fast and long friends, but a truce is often workable. I had such a split with my older stepson and now we're good to go.
  • USUFBUSUFB Senior Member Posts: 830 Senior Member
    samzhere wrote: »
    So is this a standard on-land rig? Tell us about the rig and whatever. My experience in drilling was mostly offshore, working on the design of jackup rigs. We worked some on semisubmersibles too. And of course our spud load calculations were all computer driven. Nevertheless it's a tough job because the startup needs to be as high as possible (for speed) within all safety and regulation guidelines.

    For those who don't know the term "spud" or "spud load" -- no, it's not how many baked taters you can put into foil and on the coals before they chill out the fire, ha ha.

    When a drilling site is first started, it's called "spudding" -- the first actual drilling begun at that site, whether offshore or onshore. Calculating proper spud load is a critical part of any drilling startup and someone who's good at this job can command good money. Or, in our company's case, good money for the software that did this.

    The truth is that modern drilling, even small wildcat operations, is highly complex. Just one thing... the drilling "mud" isn't mud at all -- it's a finely tuned polymer based compound that may resemble a mud slurry but the drilling mud is quite expensive. It's specially formulated for various depths and types of rigs, filtered and cleaned and recycled, and carefully monitored. The way it works is that the "mud" is forced down the inside of the drill pipe, and its pressure is used to spin the drill bit. Then the mud flows outside the pipe and returns up the outside of the pipe. If you get a blockage or stoppage in the mud, you can quickly burn out a very expensive drill bit, that then has to be removed and replaced, during which you've got to pull the entire drill string, pipe section at a time. That's known as "tripping" and that itself is expensive and totally lost time during a drill sequence.

    US has a fascinating but tough job.

    Sam, it's just a little land rig. Top drive, not kelly, one armed bandit to bring joints of pipe up to the floor to make connections. The wells this operator is drilling are vertical wells, ~6,000', so nothing too fancy is required.

    Re: the term spud load, I think we're working with different definitions. For me, the spud load is the initial load of drilling chemicals delivered to the well- bentonite clay (gel), barite, lost circulation materials, thinners, viscosifiers, and other additives.

    Its funny you mentioned drilling mud. I'm the mud engineer for this well. I test the density, viscosity, salinity, hardness, pH, and some other properties. I then tell the rig hands which chemicals to add, and in what order, to maintain the mud within desired specifications. In this case, the mud is your standard, relatively inexpensive bentonite (freshwater gel) mud. This smaller operator doesn't have the budget for more expensive polymer or oil-based muds. I've worked with oil-based muds in the past, and don't much care for them. They do have some advantages. It is virtually unaffected by contaminates like salt or calcium, and it is very stable. Once you have the mud properties (density, viscosity) in line with desired specs it does not change. Oil-based mud can also be stored and transferred from well to well to amortize the costs somewhat. However, it is also much more expensive than water-based muds and is messy to work with. Everything winds up smelling like diesel.

    I do enjoy working with my company's proprietary polymer based mud though- good hole cleaning properties, stable, and easy clean up. Pays more too. Because of the cost, though, only a few of our bigger customers can afford it.

    You're right about the tripping taking time. On some of the deeper wells I've worked on, the final trip out after TD (~14k feet measured depth), can take twelve hours.

    Truth be told, my job isn't very physically demanding. It is more about planning ahead and communicating with operator and contractor personnel. I'm far from the highest paid person on site; in fact, floor hands (entry level guys) for some of the larger drilling contractors make as much as me. But as I said, I do virtually no manual labor, and my odds of being killed or maimed in an incident are very low. This struck home last week. During routine maintenance, an air hose connected to the air brake was disconnected. The top drive, which weighs ~15K pounds and was being held in place by the air brake, fell from the top of the derrick roughly 60 feet and smashed onto the rig floor. Fortunately, no one was injured, but that could have easily been a fatal accident. By that time, however, I had been home for several hours. I arrive early in the morning to run my tests, distribute reports, send an email, then leave.
    Sometimes, I lie awake in bed at night wondering "Why the heck can't I fall asleep?"
    NRA Life Member
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,903 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Regular Thanksgiving for us, doing a turkey with apple & sausage dressing, cranberry relish, sweet taters, mashed potatoes with giblet gravy....

    Exactly what the wife is making, the cranberry relish is awesome. Daughter will be here tomorrow morning and will bake apple and pumpkin pie. Just the three of us and a couple and their son for dinner.
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    Having one of our daughters, one grand daughter and boyfriend, and one great grand daughter, for Thanksgiving, don't know yet about Christmas, but the time in between will be spent hunting, hopefully I'll nail a couple of small hogs and a deer or two.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,156 Senior Member
    Just staying home with the wife. Stepson coming home from school......

    Sticking to the basics. Turkey, dressing, mashed taters, sweet taters, green beans, noodles, and dinner rolls. Cherry cheesecake and pumpkin pie for desert...
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • kansashunterkansashunter Senior Member Posts: 1,812 Senior Member
    Turkey day for me will be a little boring. The wife has to work and the kids are at the ex's so I plan on cutting firewood most of the day. The boys will be here Friday and I will be spending the day with them and we are having a dinner on Sunday. I have a turkey to cook and a ham and I will make some rolls. I am sure I will eat too much.
  • gatorgator Senior Member Posts: 1,746 Senior Member
    I'm going out to shoot some dove and quail...that's what's for dinner.
    USMC 80-84
    -96 lbs
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,128 Senior Member
    I am headed over to my mom's for dinner. With any luck, her neighbor's son will come over and crash our family get together. That would be groovy!

    After that, we usually head home and rent some movies, nap, snack on leftovers, etc. Just a nice day to eat and relax.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,914 Senior Member
    Diver43 wrote: »
    Exactly what the wife is making, the cranberry relish is awesome. Daughter will be here tomorrow morning and will bake apple and pumpkin pie. Just the three of us and a couple and their son for dinner.

    Giblet gravy is a food group....
    Late addition will be a bread pudding with whiskey sauce....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,640 Senior Member
    Over to some friends house for Thanksgiving - I'm hoping for ham, but will probably have the usual turkey.Thanksgiving is a meshugge holiday - I've never really been into it, probably because I really don't care for turkey. I'm more into the Christmas season.

    The only thing I know about drilling oil wells I learned from Harry Stamper!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Turkey day for me will be a little boring. The wife has to work and the kids are at the ex's so I plan on cutting firewood most of the day. The boys will be here Friday and I will be spending the day with them and we are having a dinner on Sunday. I have a turkey to cook and a ham and I will make some rolls. I am sure I will eat too much.

    Well, same thing happened to me when I worked for the hospital or for other places where we had to come in on a holiday. Thing is, you can, as you say, celebrate on the next day or two, regardless. That's what matters anyway.
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    USUFB wrote: »
    Sam, it's just a little land rig. Top drive, not kelly, one armed bandit to bring joints of pipe up to the floor to make connections. The wells this operator is drilling are vertical wells, ~6,000', so nothing too fancy is required.
    etc.

    Thanks for the added info, US. For those who don't know, a smaller oil rig (most always onshore) has 2 principal means of turning the drill stem. There's a top drive where the motor is hung from the center and top of the rig and the "kelly" drive where the motor sits alongside the drive and the drill rotation is transferred via segmented links. Larger rigs always use the kelly style because the motor for larger, deeper drilling is too big to hang as a "top drive" arrangement.

    US is right about "spud load" in that there are 2 mixed definitions. The term "spudding" still relates to the first actual drilling of any new site. His term applies to all the necessary equipment and chemicals and other things needed to be ready and available when that string begins to turn. I was thinking about the actual physical load or pressure needed to drill downward. This is controlled by the riggers and is very carefully monitored. Too low and you only make slow progress, too fast and you can bust a drill pipe or bit.

    His story about the motor coming down onto the drill floor is typical. Even a pipe wrench falling from the upper areas of a rig can be deadly.

    His description of drill mud is excellent. It shows just one small area of the complexity of drilling these days. Modern tools and modern drill muds make the drilling much faster and you can go deeper than in the old wildcatting days.

    US, I did some research work on a new type of skid for downhole communication. As a definition for those who don't know, a "skid" is of course the large metal frame on which various components of the drill machinery sit. Skids are heavy steel frames built so they can be winched onto a truck for moving around, and are all about the same general size for ease of planning, about 8-10 feet wide by maybe 18 feet long (I forget the actual sizes). But when you say "skid" you don't necessarily refer to the actual metal skid frame, but the equipment sitting on the skid.

    When you're drilling, in the drill head are various instruments that measure pressure and temperature and other things and then send messages up along the return of the mud via "thumps" in the mud pressure like morse code. Of course radio messages are also used but when drilling thru 10,000 feet of rock, radio signals are sketchy at best. Anyway, there is a receiving station (sitting on a skid) near the drill rig and it receives the thumping signals and this tells the drillers whether they're passing thru hard rock (need to slow down so you don't burn out a bit) or gaseous zones or whatever. And then the drill pressure and rotation speed is changed accordingly.

    Many don't know this, but drilling isn't performed straight down any more. Drill strings can be maneuvered and the drill bit tilted up and down and side to side to drill almost sideways. That way, in a larger operation, say at sea from a drill ship or floating drill rig, you can drill maybe a dozen different wells and start all of them near each other where the bit penetrates the seabed, but then angle the drilling off and catch different pockets of oil or gas.

    The way it's done is to stop the drilling, and then send pulse signals to the drill stem that then turn the drill bit various directions, then you start drilling again.

    The invention I worked with was a new device to change drilling direction while the drilling was still in progress, without stopping the drill. This saves time and time is money in drilling.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Got the bird thawing out.....cold as all get out that morning when I shot it, in fact, it stayed frozen fer a couple weeks....I only had one chance and one .22 cartridge so I had to make a head or neck shot count....storm picking up and a hungry family was eagerly awaiting my return..........so I slowly made my way home in the snow drifts with my bounty slung over my shoulder. In the distance I could barely make out our cabin and the smoke from the wood burning in the chimney was slowly swirling up into the frigid air.........then as I got closer I could just make out the faces of the children sitting around the table...........as I opened the cabin door their forlorn faces turned to sheer joy as they spotted the Tom I was carrying.............

    Then suddenly Mrs Chief hollered for some help to get the Butterball she just bought at Publix out of my MILs car and I was jolted back to reality........The End.............:punch::rotflmao::rotflmao:

    Oldest daughter driving up and MIL coming over.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Diver43 wrote: »
    Exactly what the wife is making, the cranberry relish is awesome. Daughter will be here tomorrow morning and will bake apple and pumpkin pie. Just the three of us and a couple and their son for dinner.

    Size of the gathering is not a factor -- it's the closeness of the family. Sounds good, dude.
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Big Chief wrote: »
    Then suddenly Mrs Chief hollered for some help to get the Butterball she just bought at Publix out of my MILs car and I was jolted back to reality........The End.............
    Oldest daughter driving up and MIL coming over.

    Great and funny story! I was all ready to ask if the turkey was already frozen while you were shooting it...
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,903 Senior Member
    Big Chief wrote: »
    Got the bird thawing out.....cold as all get out that morning when I shot it, in fact, it stayed frozen fer a couple weeks....I only had one chance and one .22 cartridge so I had to make a head or neck shot count....storm picking up and a hungry family was eagerly awaiting my return..........so I slowly made my way home in the snow drifts with my bounty slung over my shoulder. In the distance I could barely make out our cabin and the smoke from the wood burning in the chimney was slowly swirling up into the frigid air.........then as I got closer I could just make out the faces of the children sitting around the table...........as I opened the cabin door their forlorn faces turned to sheer joy as they spotted the Tom I was carrying.............

    Then suddenly Mrs Chief hollered for some help Over the sound of the a/c coming on in our florida home to get the Butterball she just bought at Publix out of my MILs car and I was jolted back to reality........The End.............:punch::rotflmao::rotflmao:

    Oldest daughter driving up and MIL coming over.

    1
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 7,396 Senior Member
    Standared Thanksgiving fare, just immediate family this year as far as I know.

    I am making sweet potato pie tonight, the youngest daughter said she wants to make a peaches and cream pie. Tommorow I will do; turkey with STUFFing, real gravy, candied sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes, boiled carrots, french cut green beans. If the wife wants cranberry stuff, she can make it.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,914 Senior Member
    Great story BC....as an aside...I actually did shoot our turkey....scared hell out of the folks in the meat department.....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Great story BC....as an aside...I actually did shoot our turkey....scared hell out of the folks in the meat department.....

    Thanks all.

    I wonder what really would happen if you shot a frozen Turkey with a 9mm/.45/.44 or even a .308???

    cpj/Zee/anyone? :tooth:
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,640 Senior Member
    YouTube video, or it didn't happen!

    ETA: There's actually several on YouTube - pretty unspectacular.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
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