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Court rules against environmentalists seeking EPA regs for lead bullets

Big ChiefBig Chief Senior MemberPosts: 32,995 Senior Member
Good.............................Enviro-nuts say a good alternative is Copper, yeah right.........who could afford that...............sounds like an attempt at backdoor gun control to me...........

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/12/24/court-rules-against-environmentalists-seeking-epa-regs-for-lead-bullets/
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Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
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Replies

  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    You know, I honestly believe that the hardcore enviro-Nazis genuinely think that they are doing the planet a favor by banning lead and aren't directly trying to advocate any sort of backdoor gun control *in this context*. Conversely, just from casual exposure to these folks, I think that most of them happen to ALSO be anti-gun, but not necessarily in this context. The anti-gun politicians are the ones who see this as a dual-purpose weapon to impose backdoor gun control and will gladly pander to their enviromentalist contstituents while also pandering to their anti-gun agenda/constituents.

    Regardless of the intent, it's great to see the whole thing get scuttled. The notion that banning lead will somehow save the condor (hey, why aren't the rest of us dropping dead from the very same lead since we're the ones eating the bulk of the carcass?) is absurd as is a lot of the other junk science trends hitting the airwaves these days.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Kinda sorta reminds me of the CDC trying to get into firearms regulation as a "Health Issue".

    I agree most Enviro-nuts may think it is just a way to make Happy Nature better for Mother Earth. Most are anti-hunting too, don't forget that angle.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,324 Senior Member
    Good news indeed, and hopefully good news for those of us in the California Condor Cuddling Collective.

    I went to Barnes coppers for my .30-06 because of the likelihood that California legislators would expand their lead ban from the known condor range to the entire state (which they have - takes full effect in 2019 unless shot down prior). The positive is that they are very accurate and VERY effective, and I'll probably keep hunting with them because of that regardless of the political outcome. The negative is that, yeah, they're expensive - to the tune of about $0.80-$0.90 apiece for my 168 grain TTSX's.

    Rotometals has an experimental casting alloy out that's made of bismuth and tin. Increased production may knock it down from the introductory rate of about $20 a pound. (traditional casting alloys are about $2 a pound IF you're not mining the range berm or scrounging wheelweights). Probably workable for most of us shooting BPCR and such, but I doubt it'll be soft enough for the traditional muzzleloader crowd.

    Then there's the added fun of carrying the receipt or box for your ammo, bullets, or lead-free casting alloy so you can prove to the nice Fish & Game cop you aren't hunting with political plutonium.

    I've often said that there's little chance of us winning much against the Moonbat Multitude in the California legislature, and that we inevitably have to wait for the courts to slap their nonsense down. Good to see it starting to happen.:up:
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Bigslug wrote: »
    Good news indeed, and hopefully good news for those of us in the California Condor Cuddling Collective.

    I went to Barnes coppers for my .30-06 because of the likelihood that California legislators would expand their lead ban from the known condor range to the entire state (which they have - takes full effect in 2019 unless shot down prior). The positive is that they are very accurate and VERY effective, and I'll probably keep hunting with them because of that regardless of the political outcome. The negative is that, yeah, they're expensive - to the tune of about $0.80-$0.90 apiece for my 168 grain TTSX's.

    Rotometals has an experimental casting alloy out that's made of bismuth and tin. Increased production may knock it down from the introductory rate of about $20 a pound. (traditional casting alloys are about $2 a pound IF you're not mining the range berm or scrounging wheelweights). Probably workable for most of us shooting BPCR and such, but I doubt it'll be soft enough for the traditional muzzleloader crowd.

    Then there's the added fun of carrying the receipt or box for your ammo, bullets, or lead-free casting alloy so you can prove to the nice Fish & Game cop you aren't hunting with political plutonium.

    I've often said that there's little chance of us winning much against the Moonbat Multitude in the California legislature, and that we inevitably have to wait for the courts to slap their nonsense down. Good to see it starting to happen.:up:

    Is this for real?? :yikes:
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 25,125 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    Is this for real?? :yikes:
    I'm not sure everywhere; a game warden showed me a box with a battery operated sensor that was able to tell if shotgun shells were loaded with lead or something else.

    Been awhile, don't know for sure if it is still used.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    NN wrote: »
    I'm not sure everywhere; a game warden showed me a box with a battery operated sensor that was able to tell if shotgun shells were loaded with lead or something else.

    Been awhile, don't know for sure if it is still used.

    When steel was the only option for waterfowl and upland hunting on state reserves that required it, a good magnet was all that was required. With bismuth and some of the other exotic shot, I have no idea how they could discern what was in it short of a portable GCMS machine.

    Tis one of the reasons I quit duck hunting. I reloaded my own shells with bismuth shot(cost 1/3 the price of loaded shotshells), and the filthy little troll of a game warden in my county didn't like that one bit. We had more than one heated discussion on the subject on the water. Now why would I reload my own other than to save money? Simple reason is that I did not own, nor did I intend to buy a shotgun that shot 3" or 3 1/2" magnum shotshells just to duck hunt. My previous years of duck hunting had been with shotguns chambered for 2 3/4" shotshells, and with lead shot, and later bismuth, they were totally adequate for the task. When steel came out, I had no shotgun rated for steel shot, and didn't feel the need for buying a replacement barrel just to shoot waterfowl, so I quit until the bismuth shot became available as a reloading component.

    I did win a Rem. 870 that shoots 3 1/2" mag. loads in steel, bismuth, or lead in a Wild Turkey Federation raffle several years ago, but now I'd probably just get into another profanity laced argument with the filthy little troll of a game warden when he went ballistic over my reloads again! :roll2: :jester:
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    ― Douglas Adams
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Sounds like you and the Possum Police ain't drinking buddies :tooth:
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Big Chief wrote: »
    Sounds like you and the Possum Police ain't drinking buddies :tooth:

    This particular Possum Policeman is as worthless a human being as I have ever had the misfortune to encounter. We've had some fine ones here in this county. The one he replaced was busted for growing marijuana on state land in a particularly hard to get to area(locked gated entry)and the TBI caught him tending the crop. It could have been for medicinal purposes, I guess. A total of around an acre of plots; he must have had some bad rheumatiz, or sumpin'.:rotflmao: And the one before that was forever deep in a bottle of Jack Daniel's. Only thing I can figure is that East TN gets the ones barely above reject level.

    The head guy in the county to the East is a short little feller with a Napoleon complex. And the female warden that takes care of the upper end of this county and the lower half of the county North is forever getting in trouble for being an anus chapeau with most of the encounters she has with hunters/fishermen. She's a real piece of work.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,324 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    Is this for real?? :yikes:

    That's where we seem to be headed in Cali. Part of why they set the full implementation of the law back to 2019 is so DFG can hear concerns and figure out how exactly they're supposed to implement this piece of crap. Seeing as most of their salary comes from licensing fees, and this stands to drive a fair number of folks out of the sport, I can't see them as being real gung-ho regarding anything to do with it.

    There also exists the possibility of the Fed banning NON-lead bullets on the grounds they are "armor piercing", which would pretty much hamstring the California law - not that either is a good option.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Bigslug wrote: »

    There also exists the possibility of the Fed banning NON-lead bullets on the grounds they are "armor piercing", which would pretty much hamstring the California law - not that either is a good option.

    If the Feds ban non-lead bullets that would throw a wrench in the works for Barnes. I do see a new niche in bullet manufacturing for non lead cup and core bullets using bismuth alloys and other heavy metals as core material. They would be expensive, though. Surprised that they haven't already been offered(to my knowledge)except for the .22 rimfire stuff that is required in California. Maybe sintered depleted uranium cores?
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Pure lead cannot be toxic. No way! There are areas of the Deep South where the damn yankees dropped so many Minnie' balls and the Rebels shot so many....I mean millions....that if there was any danger it would have been long ago evident!
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 24,981 Senior Member
    Just another facet of the world wide anti-Pb hysteria. Started in Europe, and spread here. Google "RoHS" - thanx Europe...
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
    )O(
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Condors aren't endangered because of lead- - - - -the prehistoric buzzards just ran out of Wooly Mammoth carcasses to eat!
    :roll:
    Jerry
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,324 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Condors aren't endangered because of lead- - - - -the prehistoric buzzards just ran out of Wooly Mammoth carcasses to eat!
    :roll:
    Jerry

    Oh, it's even better than that. . .In the Pleistocene, they almost assuredly ate whales that beached themselves. . .the same whales the condor-hugging crowd works fervently to shove back in the water, or take down to Sea World until they get better. Greenpeace is starving the condor!
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    I was just reading an electronics book "How To Diagnose And Fix Everything Electronic" By M J Geier also a Composer and Jazz/Classical/Pop musician. He was talking about solder with lead 60/40 and said sodering irons (most?) don't get hot enough to cause lead to vaporize and the smoke is from the rosin core and he mentioned that stupid RoHS regulation.

    Lead will melt at 621 degrees, but I don't know what temperature it vaporizes at?

    The lead free solder has warnings not to breathe the fumes either and naturally wash your hands after handling.

    Guy had his own repair shop at age 8 and was featured in the Miami News.
    It (the book) was a Christmas present from one of my daughters... on my Amazon wish list. Along with the latest Shooter's Bible and Gun Digest she gave me..............so I have plenty to read.


    OK lead vaporizes at 1750 C and 3182 F, if I got that straight.

    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/melting-boiling-temperatures-d_392.html

    So if ingested, lead is harmful, but in solder the smoke is rosin, what about bullet casting.. is the smoke from impurities or other metals?????

    Indoor ranges say no.............because of spatter on backstops putting particles of lead in the air? To my knowledge when shootin lead bullets the smoke is from the lube...correct. How hot does burning powder get?

    Why all the fuss then? I mean I wouldn't wanna drink from a lead/pewter mug and don't carry bullets around in my mouth like a tailor does pins...............
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Well, back when I was in nuke power we had a yearly whole body scan to check for methyl ethyl bad stuff that we might have breathed in/ingested during the year. I was casting a lot of lead bullets, sinkers, and crappie jigs during those years. Long story short, with all that lead casting, ingot molding from nasty wheel weights, handling all that lead from bullets and jigs, I did NOT have an elevated level of lead in my carcass.

    However, I DID have some elevated levels of other metals from welding on farm equipment and other stuff. Metals like molybdenum, nickel, and a few others I forget. So with a data set of one (me) I know that all that lead casting I did during those years didn't cause me to ingest mass quantities of lead. I did a lot of soldering on electronics stuff back then, too. The machine the nuke plant used to detect the metals was not a cheap machine; it required about a half hour of standing still in something resembling a fiberglass coffin while the machine scanned you.

    And the even better news is that I didn't have any elevated levels of nuclear grade uranium, plutonium, or any fission products, either.

    Most of the elevated lead levels in people is from hongry kids eating lead paint chips in old buildings. Lead has a sweet taste in paint according to doctors (I assume that they asked patients with high lead levels how the paint chips tasted, and didn't do a paint taste test themselves :silly:).
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,813 Senior Member
    Bigslug wrote: »
    ...The positive is that they are very accurate and VERY effective, and I'll probably keep hunting with them because of that regardless of the political outcome. The negative is that, yeah, they're expensive - to the tune of about $0.80-$0.90 apiece for my 168 grain TTSX's.

    The only experience I have with solid coppers is in 70 grain Barnes Triple Shock in .223, and I can testify that they hold the same sight-in as 68 grain Hornady Match, and compare very favorably with the accuracy of the match bullets, using exactly the same charge. As for terminal performance, my 7 year old (at the time) grandson killed two small deer with .223 55 grain Barnes TSX factory loads, and the wounds were comparable to wounds I've seen with .243 and .30-06 standard ammo.

    The Barnes bullets weren't experimented with due to any anti-lead bias, but because they work.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Don't get me wrong, I do think lead can be dangerous if ingested/swallowed or vaporized and breathed in your lungs. And I know in FLA they call it a "Fisherman's Disease" when they cast their own lead sinkers, but I'm not sure how they get get lead poisoning more than a bullet casting person does?????

    I'm not suggesting you drink a glass of ice water with lead cubes for ice either. Lots of crazy Royalty like Kings/ Queens characters and others in history were found with forensics to have ingested lead through goblets and eating utensils and even given it to drink by doctors as a cure- all along with arsenic!

    And I guess millions and millions of lead solder connections buried in landfills from old computers may eventually find its way into into water supplies and soil.

    I think the dangers are real and common sense practices have to be followed to stay safe from it ill effects.

    Gun grabbers and anti hunting/fishing groups love to bring up the evils of lead.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Where did the lead come from in the first place- - - - -Mars or somewhere? I'll bet it got mined, just like other metals. Lead has been in the environment since time began- - - - -we just learned how to use it, like copper, iron, zinc, mercury, and a few rare metals that Mike used to play games with at the nuke plant! Tell a tree hugger that and watch his brain explode!
    Jerry
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Bigslug wrote: »
    Seeing as most of their salary comes from licensing fees, and this stands to drive a fair number of folks out of the sport, I can't see them as being real gung-ho regarding anything to do with it.

    There also exists the possibility of the Fed banning NON-lead bullets on the grounds they are "armor piercing", which would pretty much hamstring the California law - not that either is a good option.

    I think this is the main goal of the libtard anties and a lot of them don't give a rat's ass about the environment. Or at least they really don't believe lead actually hurts it as bad as they want people to believe. With the true believers it's all about being anti gun. They know that if they can choke hunting to death they will ultimately trash the 2nd Amendment and outlaw guns.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    You know, I honestly believe that the hardcore enviro-Nazis genuinely think that they are doing the planet a favor by banning lead and aren't directly trying to advocate any sort of backdoor gun control *in this context*. Conversely, just from casual exposure to these folks, I think that most of them happen to ALSO be anti-gun, but not necessarily in this context. The anti-gun politicians are the ones who see this as a dual-purpose weapon to impose backdoor gun control and will gladly pander to their enviromentalist contstituents while also pandering to their anti-gun agenda/constituents.

    Regardless of the intent, it's great to see the whole thing get scuttled. The notion that banning lead will somehow save the condor (hey, why aren't the rest of us dropping dead from the very same lead since we're the ones eating the bulk of the carcass?) is absurd as is a lot of the other junk science trends hitting the airwaves these days.

    Yeah but it's hard to draw a line here. Saying that on the one hand they're just environmental radicals but on their next page in another chapter they are anti gun is like saying I want my car to make efficient power, but I want it to get good mileage too, they're actually one and the same. So I don't trust them no matter what. Myself I think it's all one and the same and the same mindset.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Where did the lead come from in the first place- - - - -Mars or somewhere? I'll bet it got mined, just like other metals. Lead has been in the environment since time began- - - - -we just learned how to use it, like copper, iron, zinc, mercury, and a few rare metals that Mike used to play games with at the nuke plant! Tell a tree hugger that and watch his brain explode!
    Jerry

    :spittingcoffee: More truth to that statement than you know!

    Inspection of new fuel bundles: They came two to a carrier. If Big Chief saw one of those carriers, he'd swear that they contained some kind of missile. After the accelerometers on the outside of the casing were checked for no impacts to trip them, the case was opened. Thin cotton cloth gloves were used from this point on. Once the cover was removed, the two fuel bundles were visually checked for defects. This inspection was with a flashlight to shine between the fuel pins (12 feet long x about 5/8" dia.) to check for stray metal, scratches, or foreign material. The fuel assemblies were in individual cradles; once initial inspection an overhead crane was attached to the top of the cradle and the fuel assembly was turned up vertical. We then positioned the two man lift to do inspection of the fuel bundle. As we checked the assembly from bottom to top, we ran our gloved hand on the outer fuel assembly pins to check for burrs in the zirconium tubing. With those thin cotton gloves a decent burr was not hard to find, especially if it went through the glove and snagged your finger! :silly: Flashlight beam was shone inside the bundle and your face was close enough to kiss the outer pins the whole time. Radiation level was less than a CRT TV tube at three feet at this point. We had to wear the cotton gloves to prevent getting finger prints on the fuel assembly. Oils in the fingers transferred to the zirconium tubing caused bad corrosion to the tubing in the reactor from gamma rays and neutron flux.

    We used hydrazine and ammonia for oxygen scavenging in the condenser to get all O2 out of the feedwater. O2 is BAD as it caused corrosion at the high temperatures in the feedwater heaters and the steam generators and piping. Breathing hydrazine and ammonia fumes is BAD, and the stuff we used was really strong stuff and mixed with water as needed.

    The boric acid we used to control the nuclear reaction was 99.9% pure stuff, and breathing the dust would give your lungs and nose holes a fit, but a cheapo paper dust mask was more than adequate to take care of the dust. Ingesting a little of that stuff into your stomach would give you a case of the screaming squirts. :roll2:

    Some of the chemicals the Chem Lab used were just plain nasty stuff. And some of the radioactive sources used by the Rad Con bunch were strong enough that they were stored in a lead 'pig' to shield them. And the pigs were kept in a vault lined with lead bricks.

    And then there was the stuff we injected into the raw water going into the heat exchangers in the Auxiliary Building to take care of the microbially induced corrosion (MIC) that caused corrosion of the stainless shells and tubes of the heat exchangers and piping. Nasty little bugs! The stuff offgassed in the 40 acre cooling pond.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microbial_corrosion

    And then there was the sulfuric acid and caustic(sodium hydroxide) used for regenerating water treatment resin beads that was at so high a concentration that all acid and caustic lines had high temperature heat tape on it, and the tanks were heated to 180° and insulated and the product under constant circulation to prevent solidifying.

    And the 'methyl ethyl bad stuff' injected into the diesel fuel storage tanks to prevent bacteria from growing and eating the diesel fuel, and making a mess. Got a single droplet of that stuff on the back of my hand, and it burned like a piece of hot metal until I got it washed off.

    A tree hugger that got a load of some of that stuff would fill their britches pretty fast! :rotflmao:
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Life would suck hind teat working on the Iranian Nuclear project compared to all the safeguards you used. You ever seen the pics on TV of open smelting of something or the other with Radiation Warning symbols/signs posted everywhere?????

    I wish the Israelis would have bombed them to smithereens early on before they went underground and got better air defense weapons.............we should have joined them too!

    Iran needs Nuclear Energy about as bad as Russia needs to import Vodka.

    They want a Nuclear Bomb, plain and simple and it is a foolish fantasy to believe otherwise.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Mike, those same little bacteria, or at least their first cousins, lived in the boundary layer between JP-4 jet fuel and any moisture that happened to accumulate in the fuel tanks of the B-52's and KC-135's I worked on for several years. They produced a slimy mess that had a bad habit of shorting out the capacitive fuel quantity gauges in the tanks. The instrument technicians who maintained the fuel gauges and the fuel cell maintenance guys who cleaned the tanks hated those little bugs with a purple passion!
    Jerry
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Going back to the lead problem that doesn't exist, unless the soil is really acidic the lead will develop a black lead oxide coating pretty quick from exposure to air and moisture, and will cease leaching into the soil pretty quickly. I've got a pure lead slug from a muzzleloader that was fired into the bank across the road about 5 weeks ago. Just happened to see it after one of the recent rains. The slug was flattened pretty bad from smacking a buried rock, but the point is that the shiny silver colored pure lead is now a flat black piece of lead. The oxide forms pretty quickly.

    If the envirowhackos were honest, they'd admit that most lead dissolved in water is from lead deep in the ground exposed to groundwater that is slightly acidic and leaches it out, along with minerals from the rocks. Same with mercury, although coal fired power plants put out a lot of mercury that is contained in the coal.

    Kind of like all that radon gas in certain areas of the U.S. being a problem. Well, it isn't actually a problem; it's building homes over underground deposits of uranium and plutonium that is the problem. And that isn't the real problem; it's the decay of uranium and plutonium which produce the radon gas, along with some other nasty stuff.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
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  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Where I was living in Huntsville had some sort of an pipe to evacuate Radon gas from the foundation with a fan that blew it out the roof through a vent.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Big Chief wrote: »
    Where I was living in Huntsville had some sort of an pipe to evacuate Radon gas from the foundation with a fan that blew it out the roof through a vent.

    Radon gas is the #1 cause of lung cancer after smoking. Good to get that stuff out of basements fast. It's got a pretty short half life measured in days.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    Going back to the lead problem that doesn't exist, unless the soil is really acidic the lead will develop a black lead oxide coating pretty quick

    Dig a few inches deep around any battlefield from the yankee invasion, and you'll find 150-year-old Minie' bullets in remarkably well-preserved condition. Guess what they're made of?
    Jerry
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Yep, Jerry.....
    I referenced this in an earlier Post saying there were areas in the Deep South where the yankees DROPPED, and the Confederates FIRED millions of Minnies' to no ill effect from lead poisoning. Nobody picked up on my poking fun at the yankees, however! I still have about a 100 that I picked up as a child in my great grandmother's front yard near Kennesaw Mountain north of Atlanta. Used to pick 'em up then quarter 'em with a hatchet and make fishing leads. Been thinking about melting a few down and making .60cal round balls and busting a couple of hogs just for "recycling" fun!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    ........................ Guess what they're made of?
    Jerry

    Little Yankee Balls :tooth::roll2::roll2:
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
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