25-06??

WORLD TWORLD T MemberPosts: 262 Member
This is for all of you 25-06 owners. What do you think of that caliber as a whitetail/coyote round? I sold my 270 to my hunting buddy and need a replacement. I found a Kimber Montana today in 25-06. Nice, light weight rifle. I was looking at the 120 grain Federal Fusion 25-06 for whitetails. My Ruger Gunsite Scout shoots 308 Fusion ammo really well.
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Replies

  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 14,836 Senior Member
    My cousin has been stacking up both deer and coyotes for years with his .25-06...he swears by it...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member Posts: 1,441 Senior Member
    Awesome, and somewhat forgotten (by writers) caliber. A great all-around shoot. I love the .243, but a 25-06 is better with hardly measurable recoil difference. Something about that 1/4 bore and recoil that is magic!
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain
  • WORLD TWORLD T Member Posts: 262 Member
    bellcat wrote: »
    Awesome, and somewhat forgotten (by writers) caliber. A great all-around shoot. I love the .243, but a 25-06 is better with hardly measurable recoil difference. Something about that 1/4 bore and recoil that is magic!

    I think I am going with the 25-06. I just need to figure out what rifle now. I do like that Kimber.
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,102 Senior Member
    WORLD T wrote: »
    I think I am going with the 25-06. I just need to figure out what rifle now. I do like that Kimber.

    Browning makes some nice offering in the quarter bore.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,492 Senior Member
    bellcat wrote: »
    Something about that 1/4 bore and recoil that is magic!

    Whats not to love the 25-06, and in a Kimber, :up: great deer and "lope" cartridge.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    I really like mine.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,461 Senior Member
    100 grain for deer is plenty. They work.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,803 Senior Member
    WORLD T wrote: »
    This is for all of you 25-06 owners. What do you think of that caliber as a whitetail/coyote round? I sold my 270 to my hunting buddy and need a replacement. I found a Kimber Montana today in 25-06. Nice, light weight rifle. I was looking at the 120 grain Federal Fusion 25-06 for whitetails. My Ruger Gunsite Scout shoots 308 Fusion ammo really well.

    If your barrel has a tight enough twist to consistently stabilize the long 120 grain Spitzers they are deadly and at long range. Lots of BC there. If you have a problem with stabilization and/or accuracy you might try the Combined Techonologies 115 grain which come in Partition or Ballistic Tip. I've had good luck in both my .250 Savage and my .257 AI with the Ballisitic Tips. The .257 AI has a 26 inch Shilen Stainless barrel with 1-10 twist and the .250 Savage has a 26 inch Krieger with 1-9 twist. Both shoot these 115 grain Ballistic Tips very well. They're accurate with these twist rates, AND they have a good Ballistics Coefficiency.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Grizz1219Grizz1219 Member Posts: 424 Member
    My personal opinion on the 25-06 is that it is the best whitetail caliber bar none... I would only think otherwise on the larger Canadian whitetails...
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,803 Senior Member
    Grizz1219 wrote: »
    My personal opinion on the 25-06 is that it is the best whitetail caliber bar none... I would only think otherwise on the larger Canadian whitetails...

    I know you want the Kimber and you've seen everyone's opinion of the .25-06, so what's not to love? Get the thing and satisfy that craving. You will love it.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • bhl2506bhl2506 Senior Member Posts: 1,847 Senior Member
    jaywapti wrote: »
    Whats not to love the 25-06!

    JAY

    :that:
    Refusing to conform to the left wing mantra of political correctness by insisting on telling the truth does not make you a loud mouth.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,803 Senior Member
    bellcat wrote: »
    Awesome, and somewhat forgotten (by writers) caliber. A great all-around shoot. I love the .243, but a 25-06 is better with hardly measurable recoil difference. Something about that 1/4 bore and recoil that is magic!

    I agree bellcat, it's a little better than the .243, especially out around 300+ yards. I think it is overshadowed by the .243 because gun writers have pushed the .243 thinking it's better for kids and women. However, as was said its recoil is not enough to make a difference. I also think it's been overshadowed by the big interest in 6.5s because of the heavier longer bullets in rifles with tighter twist rates. The .25-06 is a rifle to deer hunt with and not for shooting targets out to 1000 yards which few here do anyway. I think the .25-06 is in the ideal range for antelope and deer. And I think with the 120 grain bullets it's good enough for whitetail AND Mule deer anywhere, Canada included. As I've said, I have two smaller quarterbores, but someday I will have a .25-06.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,058 Senior Member
    I can't think of a better caliber performance wise in that caliber. It's hot. Can't surpass it easily, although it's a bit long in the tooth, which is fine.

    I think it may be a bit much East of the Mississippi unless it's a beanfield gun, but it's one hell of a round, and very accurate. If I had to buy ONE round and be stuck with it it wouldn't be my first choice, but I wouldn't throw it in a ditch, either.
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,263 Senior Member
    The 6.5-06 does everything the quarter bore does, and does it with a MUCH better selection of bullets.
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 10,058 Senior Member
    ...four, three, two, one...ZERO!
    Not too many problems you can't fix
    With a 1911 and a 30-06
  • wfslttwfsltt New Member Posts: 12 New Member
    Read this:
    http://www.dnr.sc.gov/wildlife/deer/articlegad.html

    Deer traveled less distance when shot by the 25-06 than any other caliber.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,898 Senior Member
    wfsltt wrote: »
    .....
    Oh yeah, welcome aboard, too, to, tew, tu, 2, two.
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 23,898 Senior Member
    You mean shot placement with in the effective range of the cartridge are important?
    A Veteran is someone that served in the Military, it does not matter where they served.
  • MississippiBoyMississippiBoy Senior Member Posts: 819 Senior Member
    NN wrote: »
    You mean shot placement with in the effective range of the cartridge are important?

    Only when you're shooting something lesser than a .270, which will blow them clean out of their shoes, even though deer don't wear shoes.....
  • wildgenewildgene Senior Member Posts: 1,036 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    That's a good read.
    However without seeing where the deer were hit, the results mean squat. They used the distance the deer traveled as a metric, without regards to where the deer was hit.

    ...apparently more deer were hit in the "right spot" w/ a .25-06...
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,051 Senior Member
    wfsltt wrote: »
    Read this:
    http://www.dnr.sc.gov/wildlife/deer/articlegad.html

    Deer traveled less distance when shot by the 25-06 than any other caliber.
    Actually, it's .25 caliber. .25-06 is the cartridge. The .25 caliber can include .257 Weatherby, .257 Roberts, .250 Savage (aka .250-3000 Savage), .25 WSSM, etc. So there's that. The .30 that's listed? .30 caliber. Includes .30-30, .300 Savage, .30-06, .300 Winchester Magnum, etc.

    Issues with distance traveled might just be that the .25 shooters are hitting them better, or the other shooters are more sloppy. I know folks who'll shoot a deer in the heart with their .30-30, and aim for the head or neck with something like a .243 or .25-06. That will change how far a deer runs.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,564 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    However without seeing where the deer were hit, the results mean squat. They used the distance the deer traveled as a metric, without regards to where the deer was hit.

    This.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • USUFBUSUFB Senior Member Posts: 830 Senior Member
    Actually, it's .25 caliber. .25-06 is the cartridge. The .25 caliber can include .257 Weatherby, .257 Roberts, .250 Savage (aka .250-3000 Savage), .25 WSSM, etc. So there's that. The .30 that's listed? .30 caliber. Includes .30-30, .300 Savage, .30-06, .300 Winchester Magnum, etc.

    Issues with distance traveled might just be that the .25 shooters are hitting them better, or the other shooters are more sloppy. I know folks who'll shoot a deer in the heart with their .30-30, and aim for the head or neck with something like a .243 or .25-06. That will change how far a deer runs.

    Something else to consider: who buys a 25-06 for their first rifle? More people are going to buy a 30-06 or 308 for a first rifle. IMO people who buy a 25-06 are more likely to be gun guys with more shooting/hunting experience. They are (or should be) better shots, more capable of placing the bullet in precisely the right spot, leading to shorter tracking distance. As experienced hunters, they are also less likely to succumb to "buck fever" and blow a shot, and thus less likely to lose an animal.
    Sometimes, I lie awake in bed at night wondering "Why the heck can't I fall asleep?"
    NRA Life Member
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,051 Senior Member
    Good point. I noticed that a 6mm/.243 had the longest distance traveled. In my experience, the most common 6mm is the .243 Winchester, which has been given as a "youth" rifle or compact rifle for those who are recoil-shy or just starting out. Those are the ones that will most often make a shooting mistake.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • wfslttwfsltt New Member Posts: 12 New Member
    Someone didn't read the article. :)

    We determined that deer shot in the shoulder ran significantly shorted distances (3 yds.) than those shot in the heart (39 yds.), lungs (50 yds.), and abdomen (69 yds.). There were no significant differences in the efficiency of weapons when grouped by caliber. However, deer ran significantly less frequently (42%), less distance (27 yds.) and left sign more often (88%) when struck with soft type bullets than when struck with hard style bullets (60%,43 yds., and 81%).
  • wfslttwfsltt New Member Posts: 12 New Member
    Of the 493 deer that were harvested, 51 percent dropped when shot and 49 percent ran. If there is no consideration given to shot placement, it would appear that how deer reacted was largely random on this study area.

    How did deer react?

    A total of 493 deer were taken.
    253 deer dropped in tracks, 51%.
    240 deer ran when shot, 49%.
    If shot placement is ignored, how deer react is a coin toss.
  • wfslttwfsltt New Member Posts: 12 New Member
    shot Location # Deer Yards Traveled
    Neck 25 <1
    Spine 27<1
    Shoulder 170 3
    Heart 14 39
    Lungs 152 50
    Abdomen 58 69
  • wfslttwfsltt New Member Posts: 12 New Member
    Firearms and ammunition - Bullet types

    Group 1 – Rapidly expanding bullets such as Ballistic Tips, bronze points, etc. Any soft point bullet of appropriate weight for a particular caliber for southeastern deer.
    Group 2 – Harder or more controlled expansion bullets such as Partitions, Grand Slams, Barnes X, etc. Any bullet that is heavier for a particular caliber than is generally recommended for southeastern deer.


    Soft 360 27 58% 12%
    Hard 84 43 49% 21%

    This may explain the 243 issue. Most people believe you need to use the 100 SP or partitions when many 243 users today find the lighter faster more explosive plastic tip bullet give DRT results in this caliber.
  • wfslttwfsltt New Member Posts: 12 New Member
    Conclusions

    Shooting percentages about 82%.
    The farther the shot, the lower the chance of getting the deer.
    Deer ran about 62 yards on average.
    Shot placement is determining factor. All things considered, broadside shoulder shot worked best compared to others.
    About 50:50, deer run vs. deer don’t run.
    Trained dog expedited recovery of all deer that ran.
    Dog very important in recovering 61 deer that left poor/no sign, 24 deer judged unrecoverable, and 19 live/wounded deer.
    Dog accounted for approximately 15 – 20% of total harvest on hunting area, i.e. 75 – 100 deer.
    No difference in effectiveness of various calibers.
    No difference between factory vs. custom firearms.
    Significant difference between bullet types. This study indicates that rapidly expanding bullets lead to deer running less often and less distance and when they run they leave better sign.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,051 Senior Member
    But while they did make definitive statements about distance travel and bullet location, there's no data showing what actual cartridges were used (they say there were more than 20 used, but they then grouped the cartridges into 5 caliber categories.) Further, while they specified where the bullets hit, they didn't specify what bullets hit where. As you have noted, there's no difference between the calibers themselves. However, the question remains: do shooters who use .25 caliber chamberings (not .25-06) tend to favor shot placements that lead to shorter distance traveled? Examples of this would be shooting in the neck, spine, and shoulder. Of those shooting .284 caliber bullets (160) how many hit the neck, shoulder, lungs, heart, etc.?
    Overkill is underrated.
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