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Goose....it's whats for dinner

twatwa Senior MemberPosts: 2,238 Senior Member

Replies

  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,676 Senior Member
    :up:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    They are delicious. My favorite waterbird to eat - congrats!
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,187 Senior Member
    Mmmmmmmmmmmmm............Goose, the other red meat........How are you gonna cook it?
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Down here our favorite Goose is the Specklebelly. They call it the Rib Eye of the Sky. But I mostly killed Canadas like that when I used to hunt geese, well those and Snows and Blues. My favorite way to cook a goose is to fry it like a turkey in Peanut or cotton seed oil. Of course being somewhat smaller than your average turkey they don't take near the volume of oil or the time to cook. But if you're careful with them they come out delicious. I like to shoot em up with a brine pump and liquid garlic and rub em inside and out with a good spicy rub. Then I leave 'em in the refrigerator overnight to marinate. Then bring your oil up to 350 and baptise that baby in the holy oil. Leave it til it floats. That's some good vitals for sure.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • twatwa Senior Member Posts: 2,238 Senior Member
    orchidman wrote: »
    Mmmmmmmmmmmmm............Goose, the other red meat........How are you gonna cook it?

    I filleted the breasts, marinating with soy sauce and teriyaki for 24 hours, wrapping in bacon and throwing it on the grill.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,187 Senior Member
    twa wrote: »
    I filleted the breasts, marinating with soy sauce and teriyaki for 24 hours, wrapping in bacon and throwing it on the grill.



    I kinda hate you right now............Just spent 20mins going through my freezer looking for a pair of Geese breasts.............and couldn't find any!!!

    ( Did find plenty of venison back steaks so I have some defrosting as I type this)
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,867 Senior Member
    Interesting gun
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,384 Senior Member
    Having never eaten goose, I am wondering. Is it anything like duck? I do believe I need to make an addition to my must try food list.
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,076 Senior Member
    Around here, the Canada geese are residents, and I've heard unfit to eat. I haven't tried it. I think the farther north and west you go, where the birds feed on grain, the better the meat will be.

    I remember the first time I saw a flock of Canada geese, I was thrilled. They didn't stay over then. Now they're a pest in golf courses and anything that has a pond and green grass.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 2,035 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Down here our favorite Goose is the Specklebelly. They call it the Rib Eye of the Sky. But I mostly killed Canadas like that when I used to hunt geese, well those and Snows and Blues. My favorite way to cook a goose is to fry it like a turkey in Peanut or cotton seed oil. Of course being somewhat smaller than your average turkey they don't take near the volume of oil or the time to cook. But if you're careful with them they come out delicious. I like to shoot em up with a brine pump and liquid garlic and rub em inside and out with a good spicy rub. Then I leave 'em in the refrigerator overnight to marinate. Then bring your oil up to 350 and baptise that baby in the holy oil. Leave it til it floats. That's some good vitals for sure.

    Sounds great Snake. I'll have to try it, If I ever get out waterfowl hunting again.
  • twatwa Senior Member Posts: 2,238 Senior Member
    NN wrote: »
    Interesting gun

    Benelli Super Black Eagle II, it is a pleasure to carry in the field, light weight and has never failed me.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    twa wrote: »
    Benelli Super Black Eagle II, it is a pleasure to carry in the field, light weight and has never failed me.

    They are excellent field guns. The only time I ever had cycling trouble with mine was when I forgot to degrease it before a day out in extreme (sub-zero) cold. Any standard lube at those temps thickens too much and slows the bolt down cosiderably. Once it gets into the 20's, I know totally degrease the gun. It runs just fine dry in that kind of cold. If you feel that you must lube it, a specialty artic lube or dry lubricant would be best.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Diver43 wrote: »
    Having never eaten goose, I am wondering. Is it anything like duck? I do believe I need to make an addition to my must try food list.

    Around here where and what they've been eating is a crucial point. When they first get here in November they are full of grain and can be very delicious, if prepared right. But as the pickins get slimmer and they start feeding on Grubs and crap they deteriorate a lot. For some reason the Specklebelly doesn't deteriorate as much. They are always ranked from pretty good to excellent table fare. But the snows, blues (same bird-different coloration), and Canada's can really suck later in the season. But they all seem pretty edible if you prepare them as I described. My mother would try to cook them like a chicken hen or a turkey in the oven. I swear it smelled like a tire burning. And it tasted to match. My brother in law's mother was born and raised in and around New Orleans, being of French extract. Now she wasn't a cajun but all of those peoples can cook. And she used to cook ducks and geese in a sauce with rice, sort of a Jambalaya style and they were out of this world. I have no idea what she did, but it was some kinda New Orleans black magic that performed miracles.

    I do know that copious amounts of onion and garlic, black pepper and maybe chiles plus time will remove a lot of wild gamey taste. If you do that and cook slowly enough to get it tender without drying it out or burning it, the results can be very good.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • HAWKENHAWKEN Senior Member Posts: 1,720 Senior Member
    One of my shooting buddies turned some Canadas into jerky. The meat was red like beef or deer, but tasted different, but not bad.......Robin
    I don't often talk to people that voted for Obama, but when I do I order large fries!
    Life member of the American Legion, the VFW, the NRA and the Masonic Lodge, retired LEO
  • snakeoilsnakeoil New Member Posts: 4 New Member
    Allways pick the bird....then put it into a a roaster pan (covered) two sticks of butter,an two cups of rice...add celery(chopped) and one chopped onion....salt and white pepper...cover and cook on outside grill for around 3 hrs(low heat)...all the natural flavors will come out...
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