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Sam's medical random clutter thread

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  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,400 Senior Member
    My Dad hit the ER with extreme dehydration. The Doc that took care of him was a gay middle eastern guy. My existence confused the Hell out of him as he was 1) Middle Eastern, and 2) Gay! A straight male Belly Dancer didn't compute! Hell of a good doctor though.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,931 Senior Member
    Sam , been gone a few days prayers are sent from Jen and I, since your my age I like to think of us as a bunch of tough old geezers, and have no doubts you'll will make it through fine :angel2: :angel2: :angel2:

    In reading thru the posts someone said how hard it is to let on that we have cancer, when I was diagnosed with Melanoma , Jen said to post it here and talk to about it, I was very doubtful but did, the outpouring and support was overwhelming, it was the best therapy, and I needed that. It allowed me to tell my family what I had.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Razor and others...

    We're an extended family here, as you all know. We help each other and we don't take no for an answer. So keep plugging and I'll be doing the same.

    Love ya! (in the platonic way of course, ha ha)
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    This afternoon I went back to OC to have the pump removed. Earlier the pump beeped, a low fluid indication. I’d been keeping track of the feed and everything worked fine.

    The drug began to cause me to have spells of dizziness and some buzzy headed feeling, which is one of its listed side effects. Not too bad but definitely makes me unable to drive. Also some mild diarrhea but I’ve got imodium for that.

    The tech removed the pump IV and cleaned the port area, put on a little bandaid. They also gave me another small injection, a drug to enhance white cell (WBC) formation, as the chemo drugs tend to suppress this.

    I’m feeling okay now, still slightly lightheaded. And so my first chemo session is done. Sessions are every 2 weeks.

    Girlfriend has been awesome. I'm lucky to have her in my life. Teach has met her, she's tops.
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Saturday evening and I'm finally feeling clear headed. I was buggy and discombobulated (that's the official medical term I think, ha ha) all day Friday and earlier today. But otherwise the chemo side effects are thus far minimal.

    Several guesses as to why: 1- I'm in pretty good cardio and general health other than the big C harassing my bod, 2- the new drugs are more specific and the side drugs they gave me to alleviate those bad effects seem to work fine, 3- as was said, the chemo is cumulative and later sessions won't be so easy, and 4- I'm an ornery cuss.

    But finally my head is pretty clear and things are aok now.
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,973 Senior Member
    The drug for white cell promotion is Neulasta or Neupogen. One common side effect is bone aches as it ramps up the white cell production in your bone marrow. I just took some Tylenol for it and it helped a bunch.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,400 Senior Member
    Sounding good Sam! Keep yer skirt on straight!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • DanChamberlainDanChamberlain Senior Member Posts: 3,395 Senior Member
    BigDanS wrote: »
    The drug for white cell promotion is Neulasta or Neupogen. One common side effect is bone aches as it ramps up the white cell production in your bone marrow. I just took some Tylenol for it and it helped a bunch.

    D

    BagDans

    You'd be surprised how many oncologists don't tell this to their patients. Then when the pain comes on, the patient is frightened and wonders what the hell's going on.
    It's a source of great pride for me, that when my name is googled, one finds book titles and not mug shots. Daniel C. Chamberlain
  • LMLarsenLMLarsen Senior Member Posts: 8,337 Senior Member
    Sort of like how spinal surgeons sometimes don't tell their patients that taking Percocet around the clock will jam up your plumbing like a corked barrel. :cuss:
    “A gun is a tool, no better or no worse than any other tool: an axe, a shovel or anything. A gun is as good or as bad as the man using it. Remember that.”

    NRA Endowment Member
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    BigDanS wrote: »
    The drug for white cell promotion is Neulasta or Neupogen. One common side effect is bone aches as it ramps up the white cell production in your bone marrow. I just took some Tylenol for it and it helped a bunch.

    D

    Yeah. Drug I got is generic name pegfilgrastin or whatever, trade name Neulasta.

    Doc and RN and the staff gave me a ton of info on the drug, as they did for everything else. These folks have been terrific. I'm pretty much into details and so I wanted lots of goodies and info, and so they've done that. They also emailed me links to sites w. long explanations and similar on all the drugs and treatments I'm receiving.

    So yeah, DanC, the docs did give me the info and all is fine. Very little pain and they said either tylenol or ibuprofen whichever worked best, but thus far I'm only having minor discomfort so no other drugs. Hey, I've had enough drugs for Haight-Ashbury so far, and don't need more!

    But I'm very fortunate in that my oncologist (and the clinic where I'm going) is very up to snuff and is ready to provide me with all the needed info. Kind of an overload but that's fine w. me -- I can filter thru it as I've got time. Which I have plenty of nowadays.
  • samzheresamzhere Banned Posts: 10,923 Senior Member
    Recommendation to others who may be facing similar situations... There's several excellent sites where you can get lots of info, "chemocare" being one of them.

    I've "printed" many of their reports and docs to PDF and saved them, and I later find that I can go back and check for symptoms or other questions I may have, a big help to adding to the knowledge base, and I think that the more informed you can be, the better.

    What I slightly caution is to not get wrapped up in a quixotic journey (real or via the net) for the perfect solution. Yes there are all sorts of pioneering chemo places around but be careful to not become trapped in a search that is essentially a waste of time. And of course don't listen to quack advice, duh. Now a place like Duke University? Gold standard.
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