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Havalon piranata knives?

tubabucknuttubabucknut BannedPosts: 3,520 Senior Member
Anyone use one of these or their like? Is this a gimmick type thing or is there value to having one in the field?

Replies

  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,396 Senior Member
    My father and I gutted both our deer with them last year, and were inspired to get them after I skinned his 2012 deer skull in preparation for a European mount boil with a loaner. Great little knives. The replaceable blade concept is helpful. They're using good enough steel to where you can get at least a couple big critters out of one, and a replacement blade (or ten) is lighter than carrying any of a number of sharpening gadgets I can think of. You might want to have a pair of pliers handy for changing the blade - at least for the first couple changes - as the joint is pretty tight when new. I carry a multi-tool in my pack for emergency problem solving anyway, so no real hassle there.

    But my big attraction to them is WEIGHT and size. Leaving the Buck zipper and sharpener behind dropped at least a pound and significant bulk out of the pack. I think if you hunt close to your vehicle or on your own smallish property the benefit is minimal, but if you're boonie-stomping, it's a good thing.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • tubabucknuttubabucknut Banned Posts: 3,520 Senior Member
    Thanks for the hard info Bigslug.

    Knite those have kinda been my thoughts, but all the reviews are glowing about people switching and not looking back. I was just curious.

    Some thoughts

    The best price on blades I have been able to find is $36 per 100. That is $.36 per blade. If you can do two medium game animals per blade as bigslug thinks is possible, that is just $.18 per animal. I don't know if those numbers mean anything to anyone, but there they are.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    They are very handy knives. I borrowed one from a friend when breaking down my antelope this past summer. Light weight and sharp as hell out of the package. It makes breaking the fascia and removing the skin a snap. The big caution I'll give when skinning with a fresh blade is that you must be EXTREMELY careful if you are trying to save the skin. It will slice the hide in a heartbeat if you dig in.

    The main reason I won't replace my Buck and sharpening stone with a Piranta is that what you save in weight you lose in durability: you really can't lean into the blade on leg joints and such for critters like elk with the Havalon blades, lest you risk snapping them. It took some serious twisting and prying to take the ivories out of my elk's skull and there's no way that those thin Piranta blades would've stood up to it. The other thing that was noted above is that the regular Piranta requires use of a set of pliers to safely change the blade out. If that's really the only safe way, you just lost any weight savings in the field if you don't normally carry a Leatherman or set of pliers around.

    In the end, it's all about what you plan to use it for and the tradeoffs you're willing to make. The Piranta makes for an awesome small and medium-big game (whitetail/mulie/antelope) knife. If you're doing bigger stuff like moose and elk regularly, you may be better served with a traditional blade.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,396 Senior Member
    Sixgun's got some good points, and I should probably elaborate. It's a field-dressing knife, and it would probably make a pretty good hide removal knife. You could do a fair amount of butchery with it - hey, our ancestors did it with obsidian flakes - but it's not a heavy lifter by any means. My pack kit still consists of a Gerber bone saw for the pelvis, a pair of pruning shears for the sternum, and a "real knife" is still in attendance - the Benchmade Griptilian thumb-opening clip knife that's with me whenever I'm dressed. The SOG multi tool occupies the "hope I never need it" pouch with the firestarting, first aid, space blanket, and water purifier.

    Problem is, I'd rather not clean blood out of something as intricate as a Leatherman, and since the Benchmade is the daily beater knife, the state of the edge is dependent on whatever recent chores it's faced. I never let it get dull enough to where it couldn't do the job if called upon, but the Piranta is in the pack for pretty much the single mission of deer dismantlement, and when it comes out, it's a razor. Since this basically makes three things on my person or in my kit that could skin a deer if need be - four if your count the fact that the SOG has two blades - I don't want a two pound Bowie in there.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,813 Senior Member
    I'll probably buy one some day, just because I have a weakness for good tools. The concept is sound, so it's bound to work pretty well. Meanwhile, I'm still a little bit awed by the 4" Benchmade Griptilian that I've carried every day for the last five years. I skin and quarter in the field, and it is perfectly suited for those chores, and others. I sharpen it once or twice a year and touch it up with a steel for fine work, and that's the kind of service that makes you fond of a tool.
  • HvyMaxHvyMax Senior Member Posts: 1,826 Senior Member
    I have been checking those out when Sportsmans Guide has them on sale. I have been using a Wyoming knife for close to 40 years though and am still happy with the performance.
    Wal Mart where the discriminating white trash shop.
    Paddle faster!!! I hear banjos.
    Reason for editing: correcting my auto correct
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 2,035 Senior Member
    My Elk hunting buddy just bought one last year. SixGun is correct, they don't take much abuse before they snap-off. They sure work great for skinning though. And SixGun, I learned an easy way to remove Elk Ivories without using a knife from a Wyoming G&F Warden. A foot long piece of 2x2 and a hammer. Put the wood against the tooth and smack smartly with the hammer....the tooth pops right out without damage. I've been doing it that way for 25+ years now.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    That's an awesome trick, shootbrownelk. I will definitely give it a shot next time out whenit comes time to remove the ivories. The try-and-pry method I used flatly sucks.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 2,035 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    That's an awesome trick, shootbrownelk. I will definitely give it a shot next time out whenit comes time to remove the ivories. The try-and-pry method I used flatly sucks.
    Yes sir Six-Gun, that pry/pound/cut method certainly does suck. I can have both of them out in a couple of minutes. I usually do that back in camp at my leisure. I've got a MiracleWhip plastic jar plump full of ivories.
  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member Posts: 2,040 Senior Member
    Anyone use one of these or their like? Is this a gimmick type thing or is there value to having one in the field?

    Great knife! I got one and then got my boys one as well!
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 25,146 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    If you have a knife made of quality steel, and the skill to sharpen it, I don't see the value of it. HOWEVER, if you lack either, then I can see it being useful.
    :that:
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