Deer hunting .223

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Replies

  • Cheetoh734Cheetoh734 Senior Member Posts: 714 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    The thing I find most entertaining are the folks who champion the 243 and pooh pooh the 223. I guess that 0.020" (yep 2/100ths) of an inch make ALL the difference.

    A GOOD hit with a properly constructed bullet from either will kill a deer quite nicely, and a poor hit from either (OR anything larger for that matter) won't, plain and simple.
    (And for the record, never been a fan of the 243, nothing wrong with it I guess, just doesn't warm the cockles of my heart)

    According to the Hornady website a 95gr .243 SST has roughly twice the energy of the 60gr .223 Interlock American Whitetail out to 200 yards...both are hunting loads not mil spec or plinking stuff.

    And the 139gr 7mm-08 SST (my personal choice for a beginner) has more than twice the energy out to 200 yards.

    And for the record, I wouldn't buy a .243 either, doesn't do much for me. The 7mm-08 or .308 is the lightest big game cartridge I personally would/have buy/bought at this time, but have less than 10 hunting rifles....so far.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,592 Senior Member
    I'm enjoying this argument.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 6,539 Senior Member
    Cheetoh734 wrote: »
    According to the Hornady website a 95gr .243 SST has roughly twice the energy of the 60gr .223 Interlock American Whitetail out to 200 yards...both are hunting loads not mil spec or plinking stuff.

    And the 139gr 7mm-08 SST (my personal choice for a beginner) has more than twice the energy out to 200 yards.

    And for the record, I wouldn't buy a .243 either, doesn't do much for me. The 7mm-08 or .308 is the lightest big game cartridge I personally would/have buy/bought at this time, but have less than 10 hunting rifles....so far.

    For smaller deer and pronghorns, I really like the .243. As long as the bullet hits the target in the right spot, and with sufficient velocity to allow the bullet to perform as designed, extra energy is pretty much irrelevant. With the right load, the .243 will do this easily at distances to 300 yards and further. I watched Linefinder drop a goat at over 400 yards with his 6mm, and it doesn't deliver that much more energy than the .243.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Cheetoh734Cheetoh734 Senior Member Posts: 714 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    I'm enjoying this argument.

    For me its not an argument, I wouldn't tell you guys that have and do use it successfully to change your ways, most of you guys know more than I do, it obviously does work. How many times have we heard on this forum about old school poachers that did it with .22lr? I'm not even sure if California deer are closer to Texas deer or Midwest/Northwest deer...I was voicing my opinion based on my limited experiences where I'm from, if .22 is legal in California and their deer are more similar to smaller white tail, and the hunter is experienced or has the proper guide, knock yourself out.
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,802 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    The deer in my current neck of the woods are so tiny you could snuff their light with a well placed slingshot hit. :roll:

    Point...

    Most of us in this thread given a .22 long rifle, a 50 yard shot, some pre-practice could put a rimfire round in a deer's ear. We aren't the normal shooters or hunters.

    Would I give a .223 to a rookie? a poor shot? an inexperienced hunter, a kid to hunt deer? I don't think so. I think a .243 is a much better round to do that with because it is accurate and carries 40% more energy making the likelihood of a kill greater than a .223.

    Almost anybody here could take a deer with a .223.

    Those of us that have the luxury of reloading and making rounds that are easy for our kids and wives can make anything we want. The average Joe doesn't do that. They can buy reduced recoil rounds, but have to live with it and their kids experience.

    IMHO

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 6,525 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »

    I taught my grandsons to wait for a right-angle broadside and aim at the crease at the back side of the shoulder, 1/3 to 1/2 of the way up from the bottom of the chest. If they miss a little low, they will still destroy the heart. If they miss a little high, they still wreck the major arteries between heart and lungs, and probably hit both lungs. A head or neck shot is DRT, but also much more likely to be a moving target, so there's a better margin of error for a kill shot to shoot for the heart-lung shot, on a true broadside, and then you just have to be still for a few minutes and the deer will be nearby.
    This is what I taught the kids and the wife. Line the verticle crosshair with the rear of the front leg, and the horizontal about 1/3 rd of the way up. If it goes high, lung, low, heart, fwd, lung shoulder, rear, liver. You get about a 8 in. Circle to play with.

    I dont think the 223 is a "experts" weapon, but it is one that shouldnt be used by people who havent put in the trigger time to KNOW where they are going to hit. Most kids dont have that. I know because deer hunting season comes up at scouts every year and some of the stuff they are getting from home or buddies is just plain stupid. Guys at work told me I was a real Richard head to my daughter and son when they started, but we have never chased deer because of a bad shot.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,496 Senior Member
    CJP: I will admit, my kid got a head start.

    I like it! That is classic! I wish I had taken pictures when my kids were young and shooting. I started my three with Red Rider BB Guns. The plastic stock was still too long so I removed it and made hard wood stocks from 1x4 scraps. Jake got oak, Theresa cherry and Keith birch. They were kept in the safe with my guns. They graduated as to larger calibers as they grew. The mistake I made was trying to teach my oldest to shoot clays with a 410. He did a lot better when I got a 20 gauge barrel for his NEF. It was a better cartridge for the task.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,650 Senior Member
    All I have had to do was set a good example for my grandsons, which, honestly, has improved my own abilities, as well. Their dad taught them to shoot and took them hunting, and made them love it. I have helped them tune up their marksmanship skills a little bit, by teaching them the 'mechanics' of the shot and ironing out some of their bad habits.
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