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Montana Hunt Success 2015

Six-GunSix-Gun Senior MemberPosts: 8,155 Senior Member
Last year, my friend, Rich, and I went into the Montana big game application period completely blind. Rich grew up there, but is a police Captain in Las Vegas and had not been scouting in Montana in many years. Regardless, we made it happen and after scoring a couple of deer, we decided to apply again with the hopes of trying the traditionally much more productive late season. This time, my other friend, Frank (a retired Nevada game warden), would join us with a general deer tag of his own.

The problem was that we had also applied for antelope tags last year, and the bonus points we earned resulted in us drawing an antelope tag instead of banking another point and drawing that tag next year. Not a terrible thing to draw another tag, but it forced us to straddle both deer and antelope season, as well as hunt in another unfamiliar region of the state. This meant that we would be hunting the least prime portions of both seasons in new territory, making the odds of scoring a really big specimen in either season very unlikely. This was exacerbated by the fact that we would be confined to public land.

No worries. We decided that we would remove the stress, take whatever we came across and enjoy the week. The end result was one of the most rewarding, memorable hunts, filled with ups and downs, and resulting in 5 tags filled in 5 days. If that wasn't cool enough, another tag was filled on the fly when the other two guys bought over-the-counter whitetail doe permits with a few days remaining.

This is how it all went down...

We started months out making phone calls to various game agency staff members. One guy in particular was incredibly helpful. He told us the best areas to start looking and saved us from making hotel reservations way further away from the prime hunt areas than we should have. He also strongly suggested buying a specialized GPS/cell phone map application (OnX map system) that denotes public/private land areas. This ended up being an absolute lifesaver, as it was useable even without phone service and distinguishing these boundaries and legal hunting areas would've been nearly impossible without it.

Armed with the location info and the GPS phone app, we set off to try our first huntable area. Right away, the app proved invaluable when a local rancher got confrontational with us, claiming that we were hunting on his land, snapping pictures of Rich's license plate and trying to intimidate us into leaving the area. When I showed him our location on the app, pinging us clearly in public land, he backed off immediately (it didn't hurt that we informed him that our group consisted of a cop, a military officer and a retired game warden), realizing that we knew that this area was legal to hunt and that we weren't going to leave.

What we discovered after the fact is that his property sits nearby and abuts a public area with PRIME deer and elk hunting, along with a few antelope. Our best guess is that he likely charges people to hunt his spot and is infuriated that people can go right onto the public land next to his ranch and score just as well, if not outright cut off his clients to the best game. If it were up to him, he'd likely buy that public land spot up right away. We're pretty sure that he was trying to exaggerate his borders to the uninformed in an effort to keep them away. Even after that early run-in, we saw deer skirting the public land boundary just a bit out of reach.

After the morning hunt, we checked out some other places and made notes of what looked good. We found more deer in a different area in very good numbers, but cover and terrain masking were at a premium, and we couldn't get close with all 3 of us working the same turf. We got 3 decent bucks in range, but found coordination way too hard with that many guys and lost the opportunity when we got spotted. It was not a problem. We had already seen enough deer to know that scoring was only a matter of time and other chances abounded. We also found some antelope later that afternoon, but discovered that as late as we showed up into a non-rut antelope season that they were VERY spooky. We got close, but never got a shot. I had already decided that because I took a nice buck just last year, I had no issue whatsoever shooting a doe as soon as a shot was possible.

On the way home, I was scanning the mapping software, monitoring available hunting land as we drove along. Out of the blue, I spotted an antelope doe alone in a field that was smack in the middle of state land and legal to hunt. She was just 70 yards from the edge of the road and simply stood there as I got my .284 Winchester XP-100 specialty pistol setup, put in my earplugs and assumed a prone position. Just as I deployed the bipod, she finally took off. She ran for what seemed like forever, but I tracked her until she finally hung up broadside at about 260 yards. I aimed accordingly, the trigger broke and the 162 gr. A-Max flew. A solid thump and a bucking kick from the doe indicated a good hit. She ran about 40 yards and tumbled head over heels, going down for good.

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The next morning, Rich and Frank sat the same side of the public land near the curmudgeonly rancher's property. Meanwhile, I crossed the road to the other side of the public land on a fact-finding mission to see if anything else was lurking over there. With the sun barely shining, I found an excellent line of trees leading up a hill that looked like great cover up to a high vantage point. I climbed it slowly, planning to peek through the trees on the way up, looking for game. Almost immediately I found a herd of about 100 elk on the front side of this hill, extending behind it and even all the way into the treeline adjacent to it. A couple of spike bulls even got into a little play fight as the herd slowly made its way into the trees while the sun came up.

The iPhone picture quality sucks in low light, especially when zoomed, but you can see the front edge of the emerging herd as dark spots on the hill:

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After the elk left, I continued on to another small, bald peak about 150 yards ahead of the previous one, getting a full view overlooking the bowl below. Right away, four doe mulies filed in before me. About 30 minutes later, a 3-point buck (3x3 for us eastern hardwood hunters) came down a distant saddle and began to feed just 200 yards from my position, followed shortly by two forkies. I thought long and hard about letting him go for a bigger buck, but decided to stick with the plan, take what I was offered and tag out. This would ensure that I could dedicate my time helping ensure that the other guys filled their respective tags and everyone would go home with some meat.

This time I was armed with my Tikka T3 Lite Stainless in .243 Win. At just 208 yards, the distance was easy and the position offered a prone shot across a flat rock. It was only a matter of waiting for a broadside shot. When the buck finally turned curiously to look back at the two forkies that were headed his way, he gave me a decent quartering angle worth taking. I let one rip and never saw the buck again after coming down from recoil. He disappeared behind the small hump he had been feeding on and the two forkies took off in two different directions. I couldn't tell for sure if the buck was down, but those other bucks staring back at where my buck once stood was all the evidence I needed to know that he had already ate the turf.

When the other deer finally cleared the area, I made my way down and found my buck down just 20 or so yards from where he was hit. Upon further inspection, the 100 gr. ProHunter was found just under the offside hide, strange considering the short distance it travelled and given that it has fully penetrated similar animals on further shots. While it mushroomed perfectly, it appeared to have encountered bone (most likely the shoulder ball given the exit path that it took - not the pushed up dark spot of hair in front of the leg) and had clearly shed a lot of weight. The scale at home showed that it only weighed 37.4 gr. after impact, but the fact that it held a good mushroom despite this was very good to see.

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Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
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Replies

  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    With both of my tags now punched, it was time to play guide and start helping my hunting buddies fill their tags. The next day we returned to the same side of the public land where I had scored my deer. Before we even got to the tree-lined hill where I saw the elk the prior morning, I spotted some whitetails does in a small brushline off to our left. They had already seen us by the time I noticed them and took off, but there was plenty of cover down there and I was convinced that more deer were bedded in it. I had the guys get into shooting position on our hill as I went down to the base of the hill and pushed that brushline at a painfully slow pace. Sure enough, a small buck popped out, trotted away and hung up only about 25 yards from me, staring inquisitively as to what was moving near his bed. The problem was that he didn't separate enough from me for a safe shot on their end, so they had to hold off and let him walk.

    A short time later, we went further up looking for mule deer. Rich and I climbed the same hill I had shot my deer from, but a miscommunication led to Frank accidentally walking right up into the saddle where the deer had come from the day prior, spooking them right out the other side. We thought that the hunt was blown, but never in my life would I dream up what happened next.

    Presuming that our morning was done, Rich and I started working back down the hill just as Frank retreated from the saddle. We all started heading toward each other. Though we were looking for deer at the time, Rich was still holding his antelope tag. As Frank crested the last hill before getting to us, a lone antelope doe came running over it away from him, but then just stopped and stared back at him. This put her perfectly broadside to me and Rich. Most importantly, she was far enough from Frank to offer a safe shot. I quickly gave Rich a 190 yard laser range and he promptly got prone.

    After seeing how much confidence I had in my .243 Win using 100 gr. bullets, Rich decided to bring one of his own in the form of a Remington 700 SPS with Federal Premium softpoint ammo. He let one rip and got a solid report, indicating a great hit. The antelope ran a couple of aimless circles in the field. Frank reported seeing an enormous amount of blood pouring out of the doe just before she went down and Rich's confidence in the round was cemented. The frothy blood on her muzzle and post-mortem inspection revealed a beautiful double-lunger tucked neatly behind the shoulder.

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    After Rich's field dressed his antelope, we decided to rest that area and try someplace new. We pushed much deeper into our unit and found incredible numbers of deer in several places, but had issues as a result. With that many deer and two hunters with bad knees, unable to get completely down to a low crawl, stalking proved very difficult. We had several encounters that ended with deer and antelope extremely close (inside of 70 yards on a couple of occasions), but spooking before either guy could get a clean shot.

    Great fortune struck when Rich and I worked on a distant herd of deer. Frank stayed behind at the truck, but spotted a herd very close by and decided to make a move. As Rich and I came back toward the truck, flustered by the fact that we lost sight of the spooky herd we were after, Frank began vigorously signaling us to get down. We were perhaps 100 yards away, and little did we know that he had a forkie just 60 yards below him!

    Frank was in a good, seated shooting position and blasted the forkie in the neck with a 175 gr. Trophy Bonded Bear Claw from his Remington 700 chambered in 7mm Rem mag. The damage was remarkable and the deer never took another step...

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    With just one deer tag left to fill for Rich, we all returned to the public land honey hole that, despite being only about 1 square mile, had already produced a deer and an antelope, along with the amazing sight of all of those elk. Just as we got enough light to scan and ensure we wouldn't bump something, we followed the exact same route as the previous hunts, leaving the road for the tree-covered vantage point en route to the slightly higher bald peak just a short distance away. As luck would have it, we never even made it that far.

    Just as we walked up to that first clutch of trees, I spotted what were clearly two mule deer on the side of a hill just 130 yards to the right of where I shot my deer. A quick look through the binos and rangefinder confirmed that the left deer was a buck at just 220 yards! I gave Rich the range, instructing him to quickly but calmly get prone on the edge of the hill and aim for that left deer, now standing almost perfectly broadside. A split second after the crack of his shot, the deer leaped about 4 feet in the air and took off downhill. It appeared to go over a bend as the doe he was with took off, but we never saw him emerge with her. A quick look in the area we last saw them showed that Rich had just dropped a 4x3 mulie that never made it 10 yards from where he was hit.

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    Yup. We had just filled 5 tags in 5 days with time to spare. Guess what? There were plenty of whitetail B licenses (aka antlerless tags) left. A quick mental check made me realize that because I flew in, there was no way I was going to be able to take home any more meat, but since Rich and Frank drove from Las Vegas in an F250, they most certainly could. From our previous hunt, Rich and I knew that scoring a whitetail doe was doable, so both he and Frank bought tags.

    We had some chances the very first time we went out, but it was the second night when things materialized. We scanned a small sliver of BMA land (state-leased private land legal for public hunting) and saw what were clearly two antlerless whitetail deer bedding right in an open field. We had ample daylight to conduct a stalk, and the taller grass at the edge of the field made for a crouched approach that was much easier on Frank and Rich's knees. We had a building in the background during the initial approach, but a patient stalk to a better angle corrected that issue easily. I had both shooters set up at 160 yards behind a pair of wheels on a dormant field pivot that was stowed in the tall grass. As the daylight grew dimmer, each shooter was to take the deer on his respective side based on whichever one stood and presented a broadside shot first. The one on Frank's side finally did just that. Another 7mm Rem mag shot later, a buttonbuck was down in a heap.

    Upon inspection, I told Frank that he should never bring that blasted rifle out again. The heart was bifurcated, lungs destroyed and leg broken. My, what a mess! :vomit: Regardless, he had his whitetail and now everyone had two tags filled!

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    Long story short, despite having a couple of chances, Rich ultimately decided to not go out after the second day of the whitetail hunt in order to spend some time with his cousin in Helena. We know for a fact that he could've finished out this hunt with a score, but he wasn't too concerned after the already great hunt. Seeing well over 1,000 deer, antelope and elk, punching 6 out of 7 tags purchased, and harvesting several hundreds pounds of meat between all of us was more than ample indication that we would have to come back out this way again. It was a phenomenal time and all of us agreed that it will have to happen sooner rather than later!

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    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,456 Senior Member
    Most excellent hunt!
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,456 Senior Member
    Really glad the A-Max worked well for you.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Thanks a lot and, indeed, the A-Max worked very well. Placing a shot and knowing that it will land where you aim it always makes life easy. It doesn't hurt that it buried that antelope quite nicely.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,494 Senior Member
    Very happy for you.
    Good to see the XP draw blood
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 18,113 Senior Member
    Nicely done Luis...congratulations on a great hunt
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member


    When the other deer finally cleared the area, I made my way down and found my buck down just 20 or so yards from where he was hit. Upon further inspection, the 100 gr. ProHunter was found just under the offside hide, strange considering the short distance it travelled and given that it has fully penetrated similar animals on further shots. While it mushroomed perfectly, it appeared to have encountered bone (most likely the shoulder ball given the exit path that it took) and had clearly shed a lot of weight. The scale at home showed that it only weighed 37.4 gr. after impact, but the fact that it held a good mushroom despite this was very good to see.

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    Contrats on a nice buck and a great hunt. Sierra bullets, whether Pro Hunters or Game Kings, just work. Nothing fancy but they're accurate and they bring down game reliably. I've even seen them do this out of a .270 a time or two. I mean who'd a THUNK that?
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 12,135 Senior Member
    Congratulations to you all. What an awesome hunt.
    Thanks for sharing your experience
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,813 Senior Member
    Great report on a productive hunt, and some very good shooting. :up:
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 14,186 Senior Member
    Perfect shot on your antelope with the XP! I would have taken a picture of that rancher with my cell phone and called a CO just because he harassed me on my vacation, he must have back pedaled a lot for your companions to not call it in. Lots of cutting and dressing, good thing you got on them early in the week:up:
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • Farm Boy DeuceFarm Boy Deuce Senior Member Posts: 6,083 Senior Member
    Sounds like an excellent time. That XP of yours is awesome.
    I am afraid we forget sometime that the basic and simple things brings us the most pleasure.
    Dad 5-31-13
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Thanks, boys. It was seriously a party in the field. Yes, it was hard work, but the amount of game seen and the memories made it all worth it.
    CHIRO1989 wrote: »
    Perfect shot on your antelope with the XP! I would have taken a picture of that rancher with my cell phone and called a CO just because he harassed me on my vacation, he must have back pedaled a lot for your companions to not call it in. Lots of cutting and dressing, good thing you got on them early in the week:up:

    I felt really stable and secure making that antelope shot. It's a lot of work getting ready to shoot an XP with a single-digit ounce trigger pull weight, and Ernie and I discussed the fact that you never even dream of loading the thing until you are set up on target. The muzzlebrake requires earplugs, and I really should've had the band type that go around your neck and can be deployed rapidly rather than individual foamies, but it all worked out in the end.

    You may not believe this, but after we set that rancher straight (and I already knew his name before he told us because it was in the plat data on the phone app), his tone changed completely and he assumed a good disposition. We actually came back to see him before we left. With a few days to consider things, we figured that there could be a lot to gain by making good with him. That public spot we found near his land was incredible, and if we ever down an elk back there, he might actually be keen on letting us borrow or rent an ATV or some hauling gear. We all shook hands and left on good terms.

    The meat logistics were definitely helped by shooting most of our animals early in the hunt. In fact, another part of why Rich decided to skip on trying to connect on his whitetail after the first couple of sits was directly attributable to the cost of rush processing. It nearly doubled the cost to have it done in 1 day, so he figured it just wasn't worth it.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 4,546 Senior Member
    Always envious of your ability to travel and hunt across the country as you do. Great story, thanks for sharing it with us.

    Sako
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    I don't know what wound was more impressive the 284 pistol or the 7mm mag.
    Its unfortunate that honest hunters have to waste precious time dealing land use disputes. I think it's a problem that will increase dramatically with time.
    I encountered out of state hunters in the area a couple of season's ago. I went out of my way to be friendly. When I packed up to go home they gave me a deer (legal here under certain criteria)and a very valuable cooler. I intend to continue to foster this type of good will in the future. Its really the only solution to more crowded land use.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    Congrats, Luis, on a great hunt and a great story.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    My pleasure sharing it, fellas.
    early wrote: »
    I don't know what wound was more impressive the 284 pistol or the 7mm mag.
    Its unfortunate that honest hunters have to waste precious time dealing land use disputes. I think it's a problem that will increase dramatically with time.
    I encountered out of state hunters in the area a couple of season's ago. I went out of my way to be friendly. When I packed up to go home they gave me a deer (legal here under certain criteria)and a very valuable cooler. I intend to continue to foster this type of good will in the future. Its really the only solution to more crowded land use.

    It really is sad that it's gone this way, but the reality of life is that the almighty dollar has just increased competition for ever-limited resources and decreased people's willingness to tolerate each other. It's refreshing to hear that those out of state hunters were so kind to you. I think a lot of what the rancher we encountered forgets (along with many other locals) is that non-resident hunters dump an enormous amount of money into their economy. Butchers, airports, shippers, restaurant owners and so on all benefit from the cash surge that hunting season bring. The problem is that they only benefit directly when a non-resident hunter pays for their specific patch of turf. The ancillary cash benefits suddenly pale in comparison when a non-resident gives someone a direct $7000 payment.

    Oh, and an update on the meat:

    I normally process my own game locally, but I think the airline attendant would've looked at me funny if I brought two entire deer/antelope carcasses to the baggage check. So, I was forced to use local processing.

    We taste tested the antelope last night and I have to say, it was just as good from the local processer in our area as the one me and my other buddy, Kirk, processed with me in Nevada. My wife's exact quote was "just shoot antelope from now on, please." Yeah, to my surprise, it was that good.

    We'll be trying the deer this weekend.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • twatwa Senior Member Posts: 2,245 Senior Member
    What a wonderful write up and hunt...I envy you!!!! Congrats to all your party that is awesome.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,244 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    OnX map system
    Alright jackass, you just cost me $30!!!

    I went and got the deluxe Michigan edition for my Android phone and it rocks! I bought some land in northern Michigan and have been waiting for the surveyor to come out and stake the corners for me so when I put the trailer up there and clear out an area for a camp, I know for sure it is actually my land. With Michigan deer season starting in a week and a half, I am running out of time. The app lets me find my lot lines and everything via GPS. If I can't find the corner stakes with the app and a metal detector on Friday, I know I will be at least close enough to know I am not setting up camp on either my neighbor's or Federal land.

    Great hunt! Thanks for the report.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I agree with you with one caveat. When I was a landowner PLENTY of folks approached me over the years to ask permission to hunt my land. Many more just tried to help themselves to the game by trespassing without permission.

    No one, ever offered to help me foot the 5 figure land tax bill I had every year or the huge liability insurance premiums I had to pay to protect myself from a potential yodel breaking his freaking neck while putting an illegal tree stand on my trees. Not one of them ever offered to help out around the place, even the guy who interrupted me loading 300 bales of hay into my barn loft and could not understand why I had no time for him while trying to get my hay under a roof before the rain came. No one ever helped pay for the seed and work I put into food plots even though many neighbors benefited from a ridiculously well fed and healthy herd of deer (almost all does on my land threw twins with many dropping triplets every year). Not one ever came in with a token gift or offer of anything on their end. Just a big smile and an assumption that my land was a public playground, and a complete (and sometimes rather arrogant) lack of understanding of why I didn't see it their way when I said no. Thanks for being kind to the rancher, of course I expected that from you. I'm sure it will pay off in the future.

    Anyway back on subject. Great hunt and great, very well written story! Thanks for sharing so I can live vicariously through you and your friends!

    I hear you when it comes to guys wanting to hunt YOUR land, but in our case, we were exclusively hunting on public land. We were not bothering this guy for permission at all, and still contributing to the local economy in the form of our trip expenditures. That's where I had the problem. If we wanted to hunt his land, I can understand him expecting something in return given the property tax situation alone for a lot that size.
    Jermanator wrote: »
    Alright jackass, you just cost me $30!!!

    I went and got the deluxe Michigan edition for my Android phone and it rocks! I bought some land in northern Michigan and have been waiting for the surveyor to come out and stake the corners for me so when I put the trailer up there and clear out an area for a camp, I know for sure it is actually my land. With Michigan deer season starting in a week and a half, I am running out of time. The app lets me find my lot lines and everything via GPS. If I can't find the corner stakes with the app and a metal detector on Friday, I know I will be at least close enough to know I am not setting up camp on either my neighbor's or Federal land.

    Great hunt! Thanks for the report.

    It's great, ain't it? There's no guess work at all. Sounds like you found an awesome use for it given your situation and you'll be able to hunt without fear!
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,577 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    Really glad the A-Max worked well for you.

    Seems to be a great animal killing "not for hunting" bullet. Ha. The new ELD-X may prove useful.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 2,035 Senior Member
    six gun, that rancher that tried to B.S. you about owning public land has a Wyoming counterpart that tried the same thing with me. One said that a fence was the property line and got downright ugly about it. I calmly showed him the GPS and assured him that I knew exactly where I was. He said he'd call the warden, I told him go ahead and call him. He grumbled to us about not spreading the word around, and left...pissed-off. That fence he said was the property line was almost a 1/2 mile on public ground. Congrats to you and your buddies in tagging out. Nice animals, every one. Enjoy the meat!
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 25,125 Senior Member
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    six gun, that rancher that tried to B.S. you about owning public land has a Wyoming counterpart that tried the same thing with me. One said that a fence was the property line and got downright ugly about it. I calmly showed him the GPS and assured him that I knew exactly where I was. He said he'd call the warden, I told him go ahead and call him. He grumbled to us about not spreading the word around, and left...pissed-off. That fence he said was the property line was almost a 1/2 mile on public ground. Congrats to you and your buddies in tagging out. Nice animals, every one. Enjoy the meat!

    Yup. We actually *invited* him to call the warden so we could see who was right. That was right about when he did an about face in attitude.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    six gun, that rancher that tried to B.S. you about owning public land has a Wyoming counterpart that tried the same thing with me. One said that a fence was the property line and got downright ugly about it. I calmly showed him the GPS and assured him that I knew exactly where I was. He said he'd call the warden, I told him go ahead and call him. He grumbled to us about not spreading the word around, and left...pissed-off. That fence he said was the property line was almost a 1/2 mile on public ground. Congrats to you and your buddies in tagging out. Nice animals, every one. Enjoy the meat!

    That ain't nothing, guys. Linefinder and I had a psycho rancher stop us in the middle of a county road and accuse us of poaching on his property. I had had a previous run in with him, so I told him he could write down my license plate and call whomever he wanted to. I then started my truck and drove off.

    I later learned that even the locals didn't like this guy.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    That ain't nothing, guys. Linefinder and I had a psycho rancher stop us in the middle of a county road and accuse us of poaching on his property. I had had a previous run in with him, so I told him he could write down my license plate and call whomever he wanted to. I then started my truck and drove off.

    I later learned that even the locals didn't like this guy.
    I remember that story. That guy sounds like a REAL fruitcake!
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,992 Senior Member
    :worthy:
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 18,113 Senior Member
    It's still a common practice around here for folks to start hanging "No Hunting" signs on State Land. - good to know where boundaries really are. That app sounds like it would make things easier..

    In Utah, it was fairly common for ranchers to try to close access roads to BLM land as well...some went to far as to use a back hoe to do it...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 14,186 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    It's still a common practice around here for folks to start hanging "No Hunting" signs on State Land. - good to know where boundaries really are. That app sounds like it would make things easier..

    In Utah, it was fairly common for ranchers to try to close access roads to BLM land as well...some went to far as to use a back hoe to do it...

    In MN, if the sign is not posted properly with your name and phone #, it is invalid
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    One of my "neighbors" decided to get froggy with me while I was field-dressing a deer over 100 yards from his property line. After about 5 minutes of listening to his tirade, I had to remind him that threatening someone with a loaded .30-06 in his hands might not be such a good idea! He finally got the message!
    Jerry
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 7,949 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 wrote: »
    In MN, if the sign is not posted properly with your name and phone #, it is invalid

    https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=609.605
    (ii) in paragraph (b), clause (9), means the placement of a sign at least 8-1/2 inches by 11 inches in a conspicuous place on the exterior of the building that is under construction, alteration, or repair, or in a conspicuous place within the area being protected. If the area being protected is less than three acres, one additional sign must be conspicuously placed within that area. If the area being protected is three acres but less than ten acres, two additional signs must be conspicuously placed within that area. For each additional full ten acres of area being protected beyond the first ten acres of area, two additional signs must be conspicuously placed within the area being protected. The sign must carry a general notice warning against trespass; and

    (iii) in paragraph (b), clause (10), means the placement of signs that:

    (A) carry a general notice warning against trespass;

    (B) display letters at least two inches high;

    (C) state that Minnesota law prohibits trespassing on the property; and

    (D) are posted in a conspicuous place and at intervals of 500 feet or less.
    Subd. 5.Certain trespass on agricultural land. (a) A person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor if the person enters the posted premises of another on which cattle, bison, sheep, goats, swine, horses, poultry, farmed cervidae, farmed ratitae, aquaculture stock, or other species of domestic animals for commercial production are kept, without the consent of the owner or lawful occupant of the land.

    (b) "Domestic animal," for purposes of this section, has the meaning given in section 609.599.

    (c) "Posted," as used in paragraph (a), means the placement of a sign at least 11 inches square in a conspicuous place at each roadway entry to the premises. The sign must provide notice of a biosecurity area and wording such as: "Biosecurity measures are in force. No entrance beyond this point without authorization." The sign may also contain a telephone number or a location for obtaining such authorization.

    I hear that a lot in PA, and it isn't true here either.

    Not saying the rancher is right, but with his reaction, how many times do you think folks parked where you did and hunted right across the line with the "I didn't know" or "my buddies wifes cousin twice removed said it was OK." defense?
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
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