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Montana Hunt Success 2015

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  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    With land access as precious as it is, it doesn't surprise me in the least to hear that people go to those extremes.

    To say that the app makes things easier is an understatement. I would go so far as to say that in Montana (and several other western states), it's almost impossible to hunt without it. The state doesn't mark the BLM boundaries on any of the huge number of accessible plots. The areas are rarely easy to discern and if you don't know where you are, you will either be trespassing, or getting pushed off of land you are free to hunt due purely to ignorance.
    https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=609.605

    I hear that a lot in PA, and it isn't true here either.

    Not saying the rancher is right, but with his reaction, how many times do you think folks parked where you did and hunted right across the line with the "I didn't know" or "my buddies wife's cousin twice removed said it was OK." defense?


    Varmintmist -

    In our case, when the rancher calmed down, he actually told us that he's had problems with people trying to drive elk off of his land onto the state land. We assured him that 1) we didn't have elk tags and 2) we had no intent to hunt anywhere past the state land marked in the mapping software.

    Oh, and as for the part I bolded above, a friend of mine almost got his/my ass in a sling due to exactly what you just described. He and his friend had been hunting on said friend's neighbor's property (yes, you read that right) for a year or so. His friend said that we were all good to hunt back there. One day, I asked him if he had ever gotten *direct* permission from the neighbor to hunt on his land. "Oh, no, [friend] said that he talked to [neighbor] for us and that we're good to go."

    I didn't buy it. I told him that people get burned by this exact sort of "mother's cousin" info, and that I didn't want to hunt back there until I shook hands with the guy and heard him say it was ok in person. More importantly, in Ohio you need a specific written permission form signed by the landowner to legally hunt on private land that's not your own. Sure enough, when we went to ask, the neighbor had never been asked by anyone if it was ok to hunt back there. My buddy was pissed at his friend, but I told him that he had learned a valuable lesson about trusting anyone who tells you that you have second-hand permission to hunt on someone else's property.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Nothing more entertaining than waking up to find 4 guys you don't know loading hunting rifles in your backyard before the sun is up.

    Add a little alcohol to that scenario, and things really get interesting. Early one morning while I was working in Nashville 85 miles away, three "hunters" in an old pickup pulled into our driveway. When Mary stepped out the door to investigate, they announced their intention to hunt, saying "We know the owner of the place". The driver reeked of alcohol, even though it was just barely daylight. She told them to leave, as we were the new owners, and they hadn't asked our permission yet, and weren't likely to receive it. Here's "the rest of the story"- - - - -

    "Whatcha gonna do if we don't leave, lady, we got guns!"

    "Is your gun in your hand?"- - - - -as a .22 High Standard pistol suddenly appeared about six inches from the driver's nose!

    He sobered up in record time, and spun gravel from his tires until they were completely out of sight!

    Don't mess with Mary!
    :yikes:
    Jerry
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Wambli

    What made the situation I described above more infuriating to both of us was that his friend clearly was too lazy/complacent to ask for permission to the point that he lied to my buddy and was willing to let us sink if we ever got caught back there.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    We have a similar problem in Colorado. It's not unusual to find small patches of private land in the middle of a large tract of public land. And, according to what I have been told, it's not the landowner's responsibility to post the property. It's the hunter's (or whomever's) responsibility to know boundary lines. Other than the psycho rancher I mentioned earlier, I've never had a problem with this, but I make every effort to stay off of private land if I don't have permission.

    The app would certainly be nice to have.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 2,035 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    Yup. We actually *invited* him to call the warden so we could see who was right. That was right about when he did an about face in attitude.

    I love it when that happens....they know you caught them in a lie. Their body language shows it.
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 2,035 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    It's still a common practice around here for folks to start hanging "No Hunting" signs on State Land. - good to know where boundaries really are. That app sounds like it would make things easier..

    In Utah, it was fairly common for ranchers to try to close access roads to BLM land as well...some went to far as to use a back hoe to do it...

    Posting public land is against the law in Wyoming and ranchers/outfitters can be fined for doing it. I can't think of a single instance where the Sheriff or G&F ever ticketed one however.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,364 Senior Member
    Looks like you guys had an excellent hunt Luis. Love the scenery.

    Helping others to fill their tags is just as good, if not better than filling your own I reckon. Well done.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • DurwoodDurwood Senior Member Posts: 972 Senior Member
    WoW, fantastic hunt!
    You have the right to your own opinion, but you don't have the right to your own facts:guns:
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Durwood wrote: »
    WoW, fantastic hunt!

    Much appreciated, but that buck of yours is better than all 3 of ours combined!
    orchidman wrote: »
    Looks like you guys had an excellent hunt Luis. Love the scenery.

    Helping others to fill their tags is just as good, if not better than filling your own I reckon. Well done.

    I loved the helping part as much as my own hunt, for sure. Yes, there were some head-slappers along the way, but both guys got it done and came home with two tags filled a piece.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    orchidman wrote: »
    Helping others to fill their tags is just as good, if not better than filling your own I reckon. Well done.

    :agree:
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 7,949 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    Wambli

    What made the situation I described above more infuriating to both of us was that his friend clearly was too lazy/complacent to ask for permission to the point that he lied to my buddy and was willing to let us sink if we ever got caught back there.
    OH is pretty serious about it to. Police and game wardens arrest for trespass, and the min fine is 500.00 last I heard. I wish PA would go to written permission. Did you know that hunting while trespassing (Taking game by illegal means ie, poaching) is not a game law violation in PA? Game Commission does not have the authority to arrest for trespass. If someone is caught say taking a sub legal buck while trespassing, they can add the charge. The fines are not as much as a case of beer and a full gas tank either.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Paper permission like we have here in Ohio saves a lot of effort for the game wardens: you either have the permission slip signed by the landowner when you walk on/off private property with hunting equipment, or you get cited. It's that simple and PA would do well to implement the system. It's sickening that a guy can trespass and get away that easy as the law currently stands.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Tennessee has an optional written permission form that can be downloaded directly from the wildlife department's website that even has a space for plat map coordinates of the permitted area, as well as the landowner's and hunter's information.
    Jerry
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