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How long can you stand to eat "Anything Turkey" after Thanksgiving?

Big ChiefBig Chief Senior MemberPosts: 32,995 Senior Member
Me about 2 days max. Not a big Turkey eater, but love the trimmings.

I read something on the Butterball label from ours too that surprised me and that was keep (after cooking in fridge) and eat left overs no more than three days and that's too long for me.

Met a guy in the Army who refused to eat any at all when the Mess Hall had it on the menu. Said when he was young a 20 lb bird was all his family literally had to eat for over a week, they had to eat it all down to the bone and then some..................
It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!

Replies

  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,812 Senior Member
    Our 16 lb. turkey was pretty much devoured. We have enough left for 4-5 sandwiches, maybe. That's just right, for me. Mrs. Bisley made enough cornbread dressing for a small army, so we will have that for a while, but it goes well with a lot of different meals, as long as the giblet gravy lasts.
  • tubabucknuttubabucknut Banned Posts: 3,520 Senior Member
    Depends on how the turkey is made. Baked turkey sucks. Most people overcook the hell out of it. Smoked of fried turkey rocks, and It is a semi regular entree around this house. I could eat on one for days if it lasted that long.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Our Butterball was right at 15 lbs. Last couple years we have been using an oven broiler pan and that is about as big we can go and still put the lid on. Very tender and juicy. We like to stuff that bird with Mrs Chiefs dressing inside and around, plus extra dressing all around. 2X bags Pepperidge Farm corn bread stuffing, apples, raisins and whatever. Good eatin fer sure.

    Didn't make our own punkin pies this year, Mrs Smith's is good and couple stores had buy one get one free deals so a cherry and another punkin still left in the freezer. I think a brand called Edward's was the same sale and I almost bought some Key-Lime pies, but wow the carbs .....................I am looking forward to the next SE Shoot and hope that nice lady brings her homemade Key Lime pies again.............if I can keep Ned away long enough to grab a slice :tooth:
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Until every last bearded gobbling little feathered feast in waiting is in my belly.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Until every last bearded gobbling feathered feast in waiting is in my belly.

    Just call me early two times.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • roadkingroadking Senior Member Posts: 3,056 Senior Member
    Until it's GONE! Ours was about 12 pounds, it was just the 4 of us-we put away a little less than half on Thursday. Picked and made sandwiches yesterday, reheat all tonight, then the carcass gets boiled down for turkey pot pie (PA dutch style...not that carp they call pot pie with the pastry...the soup).
    By monday, I'll be wishing for more while knawing on the jerky youngest and I are making today in the deer schack.
    Have another 20 pounder in the freezer which will get grilled and smoked this winter.

    Matt
    Support your local Scouts!
  • shootbrownelkshootbrownelk Senior Member Posts: 2,035 Senior Member
    The wife and I eat turkey for 2 days and then we vacuum seal and freeze the rest.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Debone the leftovers, and pack them in vacuum-seal bags in portions the size of a snack or a good-sized sandwich or two. They don't dry out that way, and they last a week or so refrigerated, or several weeks when frozen. The real thing beats those "turkey" slices at the deli counter! My parents used to take advantage of the after-Thanksgiving sale prices and stock up on 2-3 frozen birds at dirt cheap prices. They were subject to roast one in the spring or summer sometimes, and freeze the cooked meat that way.
    Jerry
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 11,624 Senior Member
    I smoked a few turkey legs and breasts to supplement the turkey. Holy crap was that good- I'll be firing up the smoker to make more in the next week or so.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,403 Senior Member
    I don't care if the leftover turkey is dry. Tomato and mayo on sandwich takes care of that.....
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • ilove22silove22s Senior Member Posts: 1,467 Senior Member
    I love turkey more so than beef.

    I just love the hot turkey sandwiches after the first day.

    Also, my mom use to make a jook(sp?). It a porridge made of boiling down the turkey carcass and other things and then cook rice in the broth. add some of the leftover turkey meat, shittake mushrooms and green onions and Its a good cold weather stick to your bones food.
    The ears never lie.

    - Don Burt
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    I am a turkey fan, a 16 pound turkey minimum size, my idea is cut up the rest of the turkey and freeze it in sandwhich bags, single servings each.

    Turkey is only dry when the cook does a poor job, usually someone that does not like turkey much anyway.

    I really liked left over turkey in my younger days, I learned to use a steamer to warm up the leftover turkey to not dry it out.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,954 Senior Member
    Until it is gone
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Welcome aboard !

    On careful consideration, I like turkey sandwiches enough to perhaps roast one occasionally and package it up & freeze it for future eating, I like turkey, I detest and hate the prepackaged stuff they pass off as turkey !

    Those cheap turkey tv dinners almost taste something like turkey.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,954 Senior Member
    Turkey tonight----turkey on Monday and some more sked for Tues night.

    Probably have it in between. too.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,812 Senior Member
    DoctorWho wrote: »
    ...Turkey is only dry when the cook does a poor job, usually someone that does not like turkey much anyway.

    I agree with this, because I never cared for turkey 'white meat' until my wife started brining them. Actually, I did like a perfectly fried turkey, and succeeded a few times with that - enough so that people brought me turkeys to fry and take home with them. I usually fried 4-5 every year, for a while, because the only hard part of frying a turkey is the clean-up, so why not do several, while you have 3-4 gallons of expensive heating oil ready to go. I even did baking hens or regular chickens, sometimes.

    But, I tired of this after a few years, and when Mrs. Bisley wanted to get back to traditional baked turkey, I was all for it. The first one that she brined, injected with butter, and placed rosemary and other herbs under the skin was fantastic, even surpassing the fried turkeys, in my opinion. So, now we do them all that way, with the added twist of smoking them with mesquite for a couple of hours, before finishing in the oven. This method is very forgiving, if you happen not to check the internal temperature at exactly the right time. I've cooked them from 165 degrees to 185, with no noticeable difference in flavor. The 185 degree turkeys don't slice as pretty as those that are removed from heat at 165, but they still taste great. I bone everything out carefully, to get as much meat as possible. If you leave the dark meat on the bone, people will take a whole drumstick or wing, and waste half of it, so I bone it all, to make it go further.

    I doubt that I'll ever fry another turkey, although I have no problem at all eating someone else's. :jester:
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    That is interesting about the temperature difference between 165 and185, I did not know it would make such a difference.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,954 Senior Member
    Yep
    3 more days to go.
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,986 Senior Member
    jbp-ohio wrote: »
    I don't care if the leftover turkey is dry. Tomato and mayo on sandwich takes care of that.....

    This; I like to heat the meat in the microwave or pan and add some chili slices.

    We eat turkey for Xmass since there's no Thanksgiving down here. Wife only cooks when there's no other option (Basically for the girls) so we usually eat at my parents', and with a mother that's also a professional chef, a great meal is granted! Usually take both dark & white meat leftovers that will last for 3-5 days, while a Paella-style dish (With rice) mom makes using the bones (For the broth used as base), leftover meat and the innards (Geezers, liver & heart) is divided in portions and froze so it'll last for a few more servings.

    This year holidays are in Chile with the in-laws and over there they don't usually go for turkey, but rather roast beef, pork or other dishes....will miss the tasty bird!
  • TugarTugar Senior Member Posts: 2,350 Senior Member
    Carcass of the bird is on the stove RIGHT NOW becoming turkey jello/stock for the noodle soup I will finish later today. It's cold here and will be eaten greedily.
    Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.
    Winston Churchill
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Big Chief wrote: »
    Our Butterball was right at 15 lbs. Last couple years we have been using an oven broiler pan and that is about as big we can go and still put the lid on. Very tender and juicy. We like to stuff that bird with Mrs Chiefs dressing inside and around, plus extra dressing all around. 2X bags Pepperidge Farm corn bread stuffing, apples, raisins and whatever. Good eatin fer sure.

    Didn't make our own punkin pies this year, Mrs Smith's is good and couple stores had buy one get one free deals so a cherry and another punkin still left in the freezer. I think a brand called Edward's was the same sale and I almost bought some Key-Lime pies, but wow the carbs .....................I am looking forward to the next SE Shoot and hope that nice lady brings her homemade Key Lime pies again.............if I can keep Ned away long enough to grab a slice :tooth:

    Man, I sure miss my mother's dressing. She's too old now to cook it. But she would bake several pans of homemade buttermilk corn bread for the stuffing. She had her old family recipe. She also had an old family recipe for oyster dressing that she made a few times. Her family landed here in this county in 1848 and hear tell that those old Germans formulated several family recipes that included Oysters. One other one was Oyster stew. Man I can eat my weight in that stuff too.
    But back to the dressing. My ex, the mother of my blood kin kids, has that old corn bread dressing recipe and all three of my daughter's have it. My oldest did make it thanksgiving but I was too busy to eat there. My mother was in rehab in Warm Springs in Victoria and between hunting and visiting her I only ate a little of my own fried turkey, no dressing.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
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