Home Main Category General Firearms

1944 German K98 all matching value?

Subroc12Subroc12 New MemberPosts: 3 New Member
Hi there guys, well you guys are the experts and i'm most certenly now. I was wondering what you think this is worth? It is a German K98 BYF 1944 with all original markings and a WWII K98 sling. Small hit on the stock the guy told me was from a grenade that landed near it while it was in a bunker during WWII before it was picked up. Thanks so much guys!

1.jpg 86.4K
2.jpg 13.9K
3.jpg 82.1K
4.jpg 70.9K
5.jpg 61.9K

Replies

  • Subroc12Subroc12 New Member Posts: 3 New Member
  • Subroc12Subroc12 New Member Posts: 3 New Member
  • gunner81gunner81 Member Posts: 623 Senior Member
    Since we are talking Mausers I just picked one up & it has 2 dates on the barrel 1916 closest to the bolt & 1920 above that is this the born on date? Where is the serial # & a lot of the parts are stamped 4542
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Nice piece of history. The grenade bit is interesting but would have to have some kinda provenance and would be a hard sell, but who knows if these old rifles could talk.

    Not sure on value, but look here.

    http://forums.thecmp.org/archive/index.php/t-130382.html
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Stock looks mighty nice for wartime/use..............refinished?
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Check to see if the numbers on the bolt match the rest of the rifle. It was common for bolts to be removed when a weapon was captured to disable it, and most "battlefield pickup" rifles have non-matching bolts. A non-matching bolt cuts the collector value by around 50%. A pristine, all matching K98 (including the bolt) can go for upwards of $2,000.00. 1944-production rifles had a few shortcuts incorporated into their manufacture, like the stamped sheet metal magazine/trigger guard and generally less-picky machining and polishing. Some rifles were also sabotaged during manufacture by the slave laborers who were producing them.

    An all-matching K98 rifle produced in the late 1930's would probably have the highest collector's value, or maybe one produced before WW I in the same condition. The fit, finish, and general craftsmanship of the long-barreled 98's produced in the early 1900's is amazing!

    One warning- - - - -unless you can produce some sort of paper trail and/or provenance going back to the rifle's capture (other than a good story), there are thousands of counterfeit "battlefield pickup" Mausers on the collectible market. Some have had the original markings ground off, refinished, different proof marks stamped, and then "aged" to make them look like war relics. "Buyer beware!"

    Jerry
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Aw hell, just go to Mitchell's Mausers and get a real purty one. :tooth:

    I can't tell does it have a bayonet lug? Late war that was dropped for "Krieg" rifles.

    They are all getting very $$$$ anymore.

    Also, while in Germany I saw plenty otherwise nice Mausers, but they made the **** collectors grind (or they had been because of gun laws) off the lugs to make them legal.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Oh and Welcome to the forum. You a MILSURP collector/shooter/gun nut...........?????????????
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 25,126 Senior Member
    Welcome aboard
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    I'm too rusty now to be considered a good source of info on 98k's, but I have retained a little, maybe.

    I feel confident that the stock has been refinished....value cut significantly, really significantly.
    The "k" block (after the serial number) probably puts it late in the 2nd quarter of the year of manufacture like maybe May 1944. (1,434,219 BYF's were made that year and mostly by German and foreign female workers.....6 days a week, 10 hours a day!).
    I think I see a bayonet lug and if so it's one of the very last, given the serial # before everything went Kriegs.
    I'm a little suspect overall. I don't think its anywhere near original and certainly not unaltered, but possibly I'm wrong. Would like to see close-up photos of the front sight. What about the locking screws? Does the piece have these, and are these matching #'s also? The inner parts of the bolt....firing pin #s....all these match?

    That "grenade damage"......makes a good story. By the way.....I own a little J.P.Sauer 16ga SXS made in 1893 that was Etta Goering's personal shotgun given to her by J.P.Sauer und Sohn. Etta is Hermann's only daughter, and she and I are only 3 months apart in age. She currently lives in South Africa, so we no longer have fairly close contact :wink:
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 8,502 Senior Member
    Cool old rifle!! Nice Mausers are becoming extinct!
  • FlashoverFlashover Member Posts: 390 Member
    I know next to nothing about dating these rifles, so I will ask why would the receiver be marked with a 5 digit serial number..yet bolt and other parts only be marked 4 digit? Receiver has 28787..bolt and safety etc are marked 8787 only.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Flashover wrote: »
    I know next to nothing about dating these rifles, so I will ask why would the receiver be marked with a 5 digit serial number..yet bolt and other parts only be marked 4 digit? Receiver has 28787..bolt and safety etc are marked 8787 only.

    Last 4 used in assembly...............kinda like our SS number last 4..........I have some MILSURPS marked like that. Common practice, but not exactly sure why. Or if I did know, I've forgotten.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,986 Senior Member
    I'd suggest you to ask the experts; this forum seems to have a lot of guys with enough knowledge to give you a proper estimated value:

    http://forums.gunboards.com/forumdisplay.php?6-The-K98-Mauser-Forum

    Pics showed are good, but probably they'll ask for a few more close-ups of specific parts of the rifle to give a proper diagnosis. Using natural daylight is better than artificial since it would reduce metal glare a lot.

    So far to me it seems like a true "veteran bringback" K98k ("Karbiner 98 kurtz" or Carbine 98 short...the K98 is a completely different rifle) with the looks of a well-used gun. Since unless original paperwork is available, the collectors' mantra is to "buy the rifle, not the story" no matter how honest the former owner was about its provenance.

    K98ks were made by assorted subcontractors that numbered the guns using a 5-digit S/N; each year a new batch was made and when the rifle 99999 was made, the next lot will be numbered 00001 and a letter will be added (In alphabetical order) like 00001a and so on.
    The "byf 44" stamped in the receiver ring was part of a State-assigned code to each factory to hide the real maker; in this case it denotes a rifle made by the Mauser factory at Obendorf in the year 1944 apparently in the 1st. batch early in the year.

    Most Mausers regardless of the variant of the model 98 will show the last 4 or, if the space was tight like in bolt heads, 2 digits of the s/n in all its parts, including K98ks and other foreign contracts (Like Brazilian 1908s, Argentinian 1909s, Chilean 1912s, etc.).

    I'd guess that this K98k can easily fetch $ 1,000 if still in original condition; value might be higher or a bit lower depending on some features that collectors consider as relevant.
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Excellent advice, Subroc! Strongly suggest that you post the photos and questions at gunboards. These fellows are probably the most knowlegable on 98k's. A select few can get a little "bossy" in their replies, but they certainly know what they are talking about.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement