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Guns that don't get any respect.

calebibcalebib Senior MemberPosts: 1,701 Senior Member
There are plenty of guns out there that don't get the respect they deserve, at the same time there are plenty that are not nearly as good as the hype surrounding them. I just got an example of the former in for a clean & oil and safety check, it's a very nice example of a H&R Defender .38 S&W. This one is still as tight as the day it left the factory and looks to have only a few rounds through it. Yes, they were "cheap" guns from the start but the fit and finish is better than half the stuff on the market today and it's just a neat little gun. I might have to snag one the next time I run across a deal, a new set of grips would really go a long way in the ergonomics department.

What are your favorite underdog gun?

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Replies

  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Many of the older top break revolvers, over a hundred years old, I can't recall brands, it was fun to buy them and restore them, even shooting them was fun when .32 & .38 S&W Remington Kleenbore ammo was cheap and plentiful.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,927 Senior Member
    Just about any of the older Savages, such as the 110 and 340. They're nothing fancy, but good, dependable firearms that do everything they were made to do.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • shushshush Senior Member Posts: 6,259 Senior Member
    calebib wrote: »
    ............ I just got an example of the former in for a clean & oil and safety check, it's a very nice example of a H&R Defender .38 S&W. .....



    That is very nice.

    An awful lot of people have been stopped by a .380-200.
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    P21_zpsclhjnoak.jpg

    The famed Ithaca Auto / Burglar shotgun.

    I wish they could bring it back..... love the pistol grips angle.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    shush wrote: »
    That is very nice.

    An awful lot of people have been stopped by a .380-200.

    Almost as many by a harsh word !

    lol :jester: :rotflmao: :jester: :rotflmao:
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • calebibcalebib Senior Member Posts: 1,701 Senior Member
    DoctorWho wrote: »
    P21_zpsclhjnoak.jpg

    The famed Ithica Auto / Burglar shotgun.

    I wish they could bring it back..... love the pistol grips angle.
    I've seen a couple of those. Neat guns.

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,755 Senior Member
    I made a couple shadow box displays from old Ivers Johnson break tops and an old S&W Lemon Squeezer. They were in such poor condition that was the best I could do for them.

    That a cool shotgun!
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    A few years ago I bought a used single shot bolt action 22cal rifle specifically apportioned for children.Its called a Chipmunk. It is a very well made accurate and robust little rifle and was a great introduction piece for my son.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • LMLarsenLMLarsen Senior Member Posts: 8,337 Senior Member
    My Hardballer .45 and my Charter Arms Off Duty .38, both 1st generation guns. Both are still reliable and accurate enough, but are the Rodney Dangerfields of my gun safe.

    Oh, and my Taurus Model 85. Yes, I own one, bought when they still made decent revolvers.
    “A gun is a tool, no better or no worse than any other tool: an axe, a shovel or anything. A gun is as good or as bad as the man using it. Remember that.”

    NRA Endowment Member
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Nothing wrong with a well made Taurus 85, Its only bad if they turned out like the
    Model 85s I had, as soft as Government cheese.... lol :jester:
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    The little ol' M1 Carbine (specially the civilian versions like Universal) gets no respect from a lot of people. Most folks think of them as neat (but expensive) plinkers, but even loaded with lowly FMJ they can be a fearsome HD-sd weapon. No rails, no tupperware, low recoil and quite handy and effective little rifle.

    Mine got upgraded to a paratrooper stock courtesy of my buddy BC and I'd HATE to be on the wrong end of this thing when it's rolling.8D4C2F5F-C511-48AA-8B96-15EDB5E0DD74.jpg

    The old Marlin Camp Carbine is another HD wonder. It has a cult following now but back when made it was Rodney Dangerfield.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Let's see now, what do I have that has very little respect on here? Hmmmm, well oh yeah it's called a .270 Winchester. Killed more deer than anything else I own and still going strong at 49 years old. Move over Rodney! You got company.......
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,068 Senior Member
    Th OLD Mossberg 22s
    The wife and I both have 151Mb She inherited hers and after playing with it, I bought one for myself.
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Th OLD Mossberg 22s
    The wife and I both have 151Mb She inherited hers and after playing with it, I bought one for myself.

    I have an old Mossberg auto loader. Can't recall the model. Nice walnut stock, accurate, reliable, good for shorts or longs.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • coolgunguycoolgunguy Senior Member Posts: 6,610 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Let's see now, what do I have that has very little respect on here? Hmmmm, well oh yeah it's called a .270 Winchester. Killed more deer than anything else I own and still going strong at 49 years old. Move over Rodney! You got company.......

    The topic is guns that deserve respect but don't get it, not guns that deserve even less respect than they get. Just sayin
    "Bipartisan" usually means that a bigger than normal deception is happening.
    George Carlin
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,493 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Th OLD Mossberg 22s
    The wife and I both have 151Mb She inherited hers and after playing with it, I bought one for myself.
    Agreed. The one I have in my possession is scary accurate.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,493 Senior Member
    coolgunguy wrote: »
    The topic is guns that deserve respect but don't get it, not guns that deserve even less respect than they get. Just sayin

    A few of things...

    The OP and subject line says "Guns." The .270 Winchester is a CARTRIDGE.

    Second, it's not the gun, nor that cartridge that doesn't get the respect, but the user/enthusiasts/advocates. Possibly because they failed LGS001: Basic Firearms Terminology and can't tell the difference between a firearm and the cartridge it fires. Same mistake a liberal journalist makes.

    Now, one could legitimately argue that a 1964 or later vintage Winchester Model 70 in .270 doesn't get the same respect as a pre-'64 rifle in the same chambering (that means it fires the .270 Winchester cartridge), but the same thing could be said of the same rifles in .30-06.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,156 Senior Member
    The Hi-Point carbine. Especially when they were still <$200..... Good HD gun for those who don't have much to lay out for something better.
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    The old Stevens bolt action and double barrel shotguns, and the old Mossberg pumps. I had a bolt action Stevens that is still solid as a rock, wherever it is. and I bought a Mossberg 12 gauge pump for $55.00, band new, in about 1965. Both killed a lot of ducks, squirrels and rabbits for me as a teenager and young adult. The Mossberg looked and felt like a real clunker, compared to a Remington Wingmaster, but it was a shooter.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    The old Stevens bolt action and double barrel shotguns, and the old Mossberg pumps. I had a bolt action Stevens that is still solid as a rock, wherever it is. and I bought a Mossberg 12 gauge pump for $55.00, band new, in about 1965. Both killed a lot of ducks, squirrels and rabbits for me as a teenager and young adult. The Mossberg looked and felt like a real clunker, compared to a Remington Wingmaster, but it was a shooter.

    My old 311 is more fun than two women in a bath tub. The old single shot pistols are rare collector items now.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,248 Senior Member
    The Ruger P-85/89 series: The ugliest Wondernine, and possessed of the same DA/SA evil of all of them, but try touching that level of indestructible and unstoppable for anything close to the price they went for. Had a buddy who's favorite handload was. . .aggressive, to say the least. The gun ran like that was the load it was built for. Shoot the same round in a 92F? Not a chance! I still miss ya Bill. . .:tissue:

    The Remington Nylon 66: A cast-iron MUTHA to tear down and reassemble, but the thing is. . .you pretty much never, ever have to. The stamped/molded/pinned approach to construction offends pretty much every firearm-related sense I have, but they are fun shooters. Smoother running than a 10/22, at least it seems to me.

    Small calibers in otherwise good guns: My bullet casting experience over the last few years have given me a new appreciation for stuff down in the power range of .32 ACP, .380ACP, etc... No, they'll never be .454 Casulls, but once you get away from the notion that you NEED hollowpoints and start playing with flat nosed solids, your attitude begins to shift somewhat.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,721 Senior Member
    The Remington Model 34 .22 bolt rifle.
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 6,450 Senior Member
    Any of the Ted Williams branded rifles and shotguns.
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • roadkingroadking Senior Member Posts: 3,056 Senior Member
    Well, I'll second the M1 carbine and the P-85 (I know, shock!)

    FIL and I were on a rampage gathering up M1s in the late 90s...he wanted the Postal Meters, Rock-olas, etc...the hard to get ones, and make them original (it was a paaion, along with Garands). Me, I bought the Universals.
    He passed away, and it was left to me to dispose of his (MIL needed money). When all was said and done, a final trip to MIL's house turned up a boat load of ammo and magazines, many still wrapped in either paper or red plastic and covered in grease...probably cosmoline. Most had very distinct stamps on them. Those were, according to MIL, my commission... Sorry, no pics presently...not in photobucket.

    Also, the Mossberg .22 LR, .22 and .ss short rifles...well...

    DSC03581.jpg

    As to the P-85...all these years, it's still my go to baby...
    DSC01955.jpg

    Matt
    Support your local Scouts!
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,637 Senior Member
    Respect The Nambu!

    attachment.php?attachmentid=7647&d=1453781447

    Yes, the Nambu T14 was under-powered for a combat handgun, broke firing pins on a regular basis, featured a rather strong magazine retention spring whose existence baffles the mind, and shoots unaffordium ammo when you can find it at all! BUT its a nicely balanced, soft shooting, surprisingly accurate, and fun gun that is still affordable as far as collectibles go. As it was the original inspiration for Bill Ruger to start his company, it can't be all bad - the dreadful by all accounts T94 not withstanding!

    attachment.php?attachmentid=7648&d=1417321969
    Nambu with Ruger MK III and NAA revolver. Grenade is an inert dummy.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,755 Senior Member
    I regret selling My Stevens 311.

    Jerm, your kidding right? The Nambu got no respect because it deserved no respect. Even when handled correctly it its prone to accidental discharge.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • DoctorWhoDoctorWho Senior Member Posts: 9,496 Senior Member
    Remember the inane hate of firearms in Japanese society.

    The Japanese were and are so afraid of fostering or creating a "Gun culture" so, they figured and still figure if a firearm was / is crippling-ly ugly, fugly even, who could love guns as atrocious as the Nambu pistols ? or any really fugly Japanese guns ?

    And with a heavy enough trigger to cripple the average able bodied girly boy, fewer people could or would ever learn to love guns, or at least simply hate guns, so they hoped, with some measure of success.

    Seeing as how few people in Japan today love firearms, outside of kids airsoft clubs or other non firing firearms or some such rubbish collectors of diverse Military memorabilia or Military gamer clubs.

    Sadly, there is no real "Gun culture" or love of firearms extant or worth speaking of in Japanese society today.
    "There is some evil in all of us, Doctor, even you, the Valeyard is an amalgamation of the darker sides of your nature, somewhere between your twelfth and final incarnation, and I may say, you do not improve with age. Founding member of the G&A forum since 1996
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    A few of things...

    The OP and subject line says "Guns." The .270 Winchester is a CARTRIDGE.

    Second, it's not the gun, nor that cartridge that doesn't get the respect, but the user/enthusiasts/advocates. Possibly because they failed LGS001: Basic Firearms Terminology and can't tell the difference between a firearm and the cartridge it fires. Same mistake a liberal journalist makes.

    Now, one could legitimately argue that a 1964 or later vintage Winchester Model 70 in .270 doesn't get the same respect as a pre-'64 rifle in the same chambering (that means it fires the .270 Winchester cartridge), but the same thing could be said of the same rifles in .30-06.

    The post 1963 Winchester Model 70 is a good example of a good gun that gets no respect, simply because the pre '64 Models were so outstanding. The '64 plus push-feeds were/are very good rifles, just not as 'sweet' as their predecessors. They are easily as good as the Remington 700's they were intended to compete with, as far as actual shooting goes, and not bad looking for their price range.
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 6,450 Senior Member
    DoctorWho wrote: »
    Remember the inane hate of firearms in Japanese society.

    The Japanese were and are so afraid of fostering or creating a "Gun culture" so, they figured and still figure if a firearm was / is crippling-ly ugly, fugly even, who could love guns as atrocious as the Nambu pistols ? or any really fugly Japanese guns ?

    And with a heavy enough trigger to cripple the average able bodied girly boy, fewer people could or would ever learn to love guns, or at least simply hate guns, so they hoped, with some measure of success.

    Seeing as how few people in Japan today love firearms, outside of kids airsoft clubs or other non firing firearms or some such rubbish collectors of diverse Military memorabilia or Military gamer clubs.

    Sadly, there is no real "Gun culture" or love of firearms extant or worth speaking of in Japanese society today.
    I would say the guys and gals working for Maruku making guns for Winchester and the like working for Howa are at least appreciators of fine firearm design. They make on heck of a product.
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,148 Senior Member
    Elk creek wrote: »
    I would say the guys and gals working for Maruku making guns for Winchester and the like working for Howa are at least appreciators of fine firearm design. They make on heck of a product.

    I was just pondering this the other day. The Winchester 1892 I just bought is a recent-manufacture version made at the Moroku plant in Japan. The same goes for my Browning Citori White Lightning 20 GA over/under shotgun. Without question, these are two of the best fit and finished firearms that I own. There might have been shame many years ago from saying you owned a Japanese-made product given the poor quality way back when, but that certainly isn't the case with their modern firearms.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
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