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What animals should be hunted with the following rifles?

spintimespintime Posts: 7 New Member
Hello,
I recently inherited the following rifles. I would like to keep a couple but am selling the rest. Can anybody tell me what animals are typically hunted with the following rifles? Also, can someone share the typical price I might expect from a private sale to an individual. (not a dealer or store) They are in decent to good condition?

Thank you,
Robert

1. Glenfield Model 30
2. Browning 30.06
3. Winchester 22L (L.R. Model 190)
4. Browning 270
5. Browning 243
6. Browning Light Eleven (12 Guage, Special Steele)
7. Browning 16 Guage (special steele)
8. Browning 243 Model 8
9. Ruger 223 Ranch Rifle
10. Remington Model 11
11. Harrington & Richardson Topper Model 158 (410)
12. Remington Magnum Wingmaster Model 870

Replies

  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Posts: 14,838 Senior Member
    spintime wrote: »
    Hello,
    I recently inherited the following rifles. I would like to keep a couple but am selling the rest. Can anybody tell me what animals are typically hunted with the following rifles? Also, can someone share the typical price I might expect from a private sale to an individual. (not a dealer or store) They are in decent to good condition?

    Thank you,
    Robert

    1. Glenfield Model 30 - Small game
    2. Browning 30.06- anything in North America
    3. Winchester 22L (L.R. Model 190)- small game
    4. Browning 270- anything in North America with proper bullets, especially coyotes:popcorn:
    5. Browning 243- any big game up to elk/moose/bear, but elk have been taken
    6. Browning Light Eleven (12 Guage, Special Steele)- anything that flys and big game with slugs
    7. Browning 16 Guage (special steele)- anything that flys and big game with slugs
    8. Browning 243 Model 8- see above
    9. Ruger .223 Ranch Rifle - small game, 2 & 4 legged varmints
    10. Remington Model 11- anything that flys and big game with slugs
    11. Harrington & Richardson Topper Model 158 (410)- small game, light for anything that flys and should only be used when a shot is assured, light for deer
    12. Remington Magnum Wingmaster Model 870 - anything that flys and big game with slugs
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • NNNN Posts: 25,235 Senior Member
    Welcome aboard
  • JermanatorJermanator Posts: 16,244 Senior Member
    What are the models of #'s 2, 4, and 5?
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • snake284snake284 Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    spintime wrote: »
    Hello,
    I recently inherited the following rifles. I would like to keep a couple but am selling the rest. Can anybody tell me what animals are typically hunted with the following rifles? Also, can someone share the typical price I might expect from a private sale to an individual. (not a dealer or store) They are in decent to good condition?

    Thank you,
    Robert

    1. Glenfield Model 30
    2. Browning 30.06
    3. Winchester 22L (L.R. Model 190)
    4. Browning 270
    5. Browning 243
    6. Browning Light Eleven (12 Guage, Special Steele)
    7. Browning 16 Guage (special steele)
    8. Browning 243 Model 8
    9. Ruger 223 Ranch Rifle
    10. Remington Model 11
    11. Harrington & Richardson Topper Model 158 (410)
    12. Remington Magnum Wingmaster Model 870

    Glenfield Model 30-I'm not familiar with all of Glenfield's line but what is a model 30? Is it a 22 or centerfire? Is it a Bolt Action, Semi Auto, Pump, Lever, Single shot or double barrel Break Open? Describe please.

    Browning .30-06? Is it Bolt Action such as an A Bolt, or X Bolt or one of the earlier Browning bolt guns? Or is it a BAR, BLR, or something else? By BAR I mean Browning Automatic Rifle ( The Military BARs could be fired Full Auto or as a Semi Auto. But for a sporting civilian rifle it would probably be a Semi Auto.

    Or is t a BLR, Browning Lever action Rifle?
    There's lots of different Brownings made in .30-06.

    Winchester 22s come in many types of firearm too. I'm not familiar with the Model 190. Again, what is it, a Bolt Action, Semi Auto, Lever, What?

    The same goes with a Browning .270, .243 or whatever as with the 30-06, besides the brand name and Chambering, What is it? Bolt Gun, Semi Auto, Lever Action, Single shot breakopen, Double rifle? See there's a lot of possibilities and if you want help or advice you should be more specific about what it is.


    Now as for what can you hunt? From what you have here caliber wise I would say everything from Rabbits and Squirrel to elk and moose and all in between.
    So be more specific and describe what you have. Anyway, welcome to the forum.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Posts: 14,103 Senior Member
    The Glenfield Model 30 is a .30-30 lever action. Deer, hog, black bear's some of the game it's good for, traditionally in close cover or at medium to close range.
    Meh.
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Posts: 8,305 Senior Member
    spintime wrote: »

    1. Glenfield Model 30 - 30-30 winchester, good for deer and black bear

    5. Browning 243- 243 makes a excellent varminter with lighter or midrange bullets, good whitetail and black bear cartridge

    8. Browning 243 Model 8- see above
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Posts: 18,355 Senior Member
    spintime wrote: »
    7. Browning 16 Guage (special steele)

    Depending on the model there could be some collector interest ... the Browning Sweet 16 (if that's what it is) has a bunch of admirers out there... but 16 gauge often brings a premium....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Posts: 14,838 Senior Member
    My bad, I thought the Glenfield 30 was a .22.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Posts: 14,103 Senior Member
    Deadpool would have known the truth...
    Meh.
  • spintimespintime Posts: 7 New Member
    Thank you very much for your reply
    robert



    chiro1989 wrote: »
    spintime wrote: »
    hello,
    i recently inherited the following rifles. I would like to keep a couple but am selling the rest. Can anybody tell me what animals are typically hunted with the following rifles? Also, can someone share the typical price i might expect from a private sale to an individual. (not a dealer or store) they are in decent to good condition?

    Thank you,
    robert

    1. Glenfield model 30 - small game
    2. Browning 30.06- anything in north america
    3. Winchester 22l (l.r. Model 190)- small game
    4. Browning 270- anything in north america with proper bullets, especially coyotes:popcorn:
    5. Browning 243- any big game up to elk/moose/bear, but elk have been taken
    6. Browning light eleven (12 guage, special steele)- anything that flys and big game with slugs
    7. Browning 16 guage (special steele)- anything that flys and big game with slugs
    8. Browning 243 model 8- see above
    9. Ruger .223 ranch rifle - small game, 2 & 4 legged varmints
    10. Remington model 11- anything that flys and big game with slugs
    11. Harrington & richardson topper model 158 (410)- small game, light for anything that flys and should only be used when a shot is assured, light for deer
    12. Remington magnum wingmaster model 870 - anything that flys and big game with slugs
  • spintimespintime Posts: 7 New Member
    Thank you very much for your informative reply
    robert
  • spintimespintime Posts: 7 New Member
    Thank you, been hoping to become a hunter for some time now. Unfortunately, it didnt happen while my dad was still alive. Living in florida didnt help either.
  • spintimespintime Posts: 7 New Member
    Snake, thx for the reply. However, im lost by the questions and see ive got quite a bit to learn about these rifles before i take a shot. Assuming chiro1989 is for the most part correct, i guess i will steer ahead using his info.
  • spintimespintime Posts: 7 New Member
    Thank you everyone else for the replies. Thanks for the head start.
  • spintimespintime Posts: 7 New Member
    Not sure how to answer this as i included everything which was written on the gun.
  • shushshush Posts: 6,259 Senior Member
    spintime wrote: »
    Not sure how to answer this as i included everything which was written on the gun.


    After the "Special steel 16 gauge" does it read 2 9/16" or 2 3/4" ?

    Could the right side of the barrel have "Made in Belgium" on it?
  • snake284snake284 Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Depending on the model there could be some collector interest ... the Browning Sweet 16 (if that's what it is) has a bunch of admirers out there... but 16 gauge often brings a premium....

    Could be, but if you reload you hold that premium way down. The only thing premium are the loading components specific to 16 gauge, the hulls and the plastic wads. But once fired hulls are not going to break you and the wads or power pistons aren't that far out of line. A reloader can have a damn fine classic in a Sweet 16. It's one of the finest bird guns since God Created John M Browning.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    spintime wrote: »
    Snake, thx for the reply. However, im lost by the questions and see ive got quite a bit to learn about these rifles before i take a shot. Assuming chiro1989 is for the most part correct, i guess i will steer ahead using his info.

    No problem Robert. I think Chiro and Breamfisher said it more cleary. But I suggest before you start putting out money on anything that you take a Hunter Safety Course, ask plenty of questions, and get a couple subscriptions to some good gun rags. The best gun rag going in my opinion is the NRA magazine, American Rifleman. Join the NRA. Then get a Subscription to Guns and Ammo magazine or just read it off here. Learn about what your dealing with. You will love it once you get your feet on the ground, and you can always ask questions on here. Not everybody grew up with a gun in hand. I was always around guns and loved to shoot, but hell it's hard to know all about them. There's so many shooting disciplines it's hard to keep up on all of them. I am mostly into rifles and bolt guns dominate my life. I have a few shotguns and have had several. I have four handguns and there's a few more I would like to have, but I'm not real big on them, as long as I have a decent carry weapon or two and my one revolver and my one 1911, I'm pretty happy. Just get to know firearms and learn about what you have, especially before you hunt and before you get rid of any of them.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • shushshush Posts: 6,259 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    ...
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    ... but 16 gauge often brings a premium....

    Could be, but if you reload you hold that premium way down. The only thing premium are the loading components specific to 16 gauge, the hulls and the plastic wads. But once fired hulls are not going to break you and the wads or power pistons aren't that far out of line. A reloader can have a damn fine classic in a Sweet 16. It's one of the finest bird guns since God Created John M Browning.

    premium;

    "Relating to or denoting a commodity of superior quality and therefore a higher price."

    Wrong end of stick, I think, my mate.
  • snake284snake284 Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    shush wrote: »
    premium;

    "Relating to or denoting a commodity of superior quality and therefore a higher price."

    Wrong end of stick, I think, my mate.


    No shush I really believe what Jayhawker is referring to as premium is cost of ammo. Reloading is one way to keep it down. But there's still a lot of 16 gauge ammo out there to buy. It's not like it's rare as hens teeth, but you may not find it in bulk at your local Wally World.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • earlyearly Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    The different types of hunting that your eclectic heirlooms can be used for can be vastly different from one another in terms of physical demands, time involved, and equipment used. I would advise taking your time researching so as to find what fits you best in terms of personal enjoyment.

    Edit
    Also I want to extend my condolences.
    If you carefully scrutinize each piece, you may find visual evidence of how the previous owner used and cared for them. For example, my grandfather's rifle was used more by my Dad than grandpa. When I did some restorative and preservative work to it I was very careful to preserve all the destress marks on the forearm of the stock caused by my Dad's many impromptu rests in the woods while hunting.

    Some of your new found collection can also be enjoyed just shooting recreationally.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Posts: 18,355 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    No shush I really believe what Jayhawker is referring to as premium is cost of ammo. Reloading is one way to keep it down. But there's still a lot of 16 gauge ammo out there to buy. It's not like it's rare as hens teeth, but you may not find it in bulk at your local Wally World.

    No, I wasn't talking about ammo...16 gauge models of most of the classic shotgun models bring higher prices...premium prices. and yes, the last 16 gauge ammo I bought came from...you guessed it...wally world...I bought a case of 6s and a case of 7 1/2s last year...should last me the rest of my life...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Gene LGene L Posts: 12,815 Senior Member
    Got a 16 ga. double that's numero uno. Wonderful gun, even in a Sears-Roebuck.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • snake284snake284 Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    No, I wasn't talking about ammo...16 gauge models of most of the classic shotgun models bring higher prices...premium prices. and yes, the last 16 gauge ammo I bought came from...you guessed it...wally world...I bought a case of 6s and a case of 7 1/2s last year...should last me the rest of my life...

    Whatever, I think you can still get several different models of 16 gauge guns that won't break the bank. May not be as cheap as some of the bargain 12s and 20s, but their cost isn't prohibitive but if I had one I'd have me a nice Mec loader and be cranking out rounds. All I have now are 12s and 20s, but I wouldn't mind picking up a good 16 ga. Pump or SA.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
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