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What's the hardest you've everr worked to retrieve downed game?

JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior MemberPosts: 7,930 Senior Member
Zee's 338 thread got me to thinking about this. I posted a response about working a day or more to get out a game animal I shot, so I thought I'd start a thread over here to give others a chance to post some of their past experiences.

As I stated in my post in the shooting thread, I've spent most of a day or more hauling out game I've taken 3 separate times. The first was my first elk, a big cow I shot in central Utah in 1986. I shot her at about 3:30 in the afternoon, probably a mile or so from the nearest road. I was by myself, and it took me over an hour to field dress her, so I left her overnight and came back the next day. I started at about 8 the next morning, quartered her, and dragged her out in pieces. I think it was about 5 p.m. by the time I had her loaded and ready to head home. It was the best tasting game meat I've ever had.

The second was a big muley buck I shot about 15 years ago. I was hunting in the Flat Tops of Colorado, and shot the deer about 8 a.m. It didn't have a particularly large set of antlers, but it must have field dressed 175 lbs. It seemed huge. Again, I was by myself, and spent most of that day trying to get it out. Finally, I dragged it into a grove of pines and marked the spot with my GPS. I came back the next morning with a pack. It was very foggy, and I think I would still be looking for it if it weren't for my GPS. I deboned it and packed out the meat (I got the antlers out the day before) by about noon that day.

The last time was the elk in my avatar. I shot it at about 6:20 in the morning, again about a mile from my truck. Linefinder and I worked all day getting it out, and managed to get it out by about 5. I'd probably still be trying to get it out if it weren't for him.

Please share some of your memorable experiences of hard days packing something out.
Jerry

Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
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Replies

  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 23,972 Senior Member
    The elk I've taken were either with horses or on the flats where a truck was able to pull up next to it.

    My biggest muley was a solo hunt in the Montana mountains that took me 6 hours to pack out.

    There have been others that were difficult, but not lengthy.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,930 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    The elk I've taken were either with horses or on the flats where a truck was able to pull up next to it.

    My biggest muley was a solo hunt in the Montana mountains that took me 6 hours to pack out.

    There have been others that were difficult, but not lengthy.

    Those solo hunts can be tough, especially if you get lucky.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    My Dad retired and moved back to Michigan about 10 years ago. Before that time he cut and I packed. Generally took us 4 hours to finish.

    Been by myself for five elk and one deer. Longest one took 8 hours. Big cow, uphill, steep. Not much to tell really. Struggle, sweat, catch your breath, repeat till done.

    I been working out year round now for 4+ years. Last elk I swung the quarters, hide, hooves n' all over my shoulder and carried them out. Not far, maybe 400 yards to camp, took 4 hours. A bear was shadowing me, but that had no effect on the time.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • Farm Boy DeuceFarm Boy Deuce Senior Member Posts: 6,083 Senior Member
    I think I had to drag a ~130# buck almost 200 yards.
    I am afraid we forget sometime that the basic and simple things brings us the most pleasure.
    Dad 5-31-13
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,930 Senior Member
    I think I had to drag a ~130# buck almost 200 yards.

    Brutal. And you lived to tell about it! :jester:
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 7,396 Senior Member
    I had to drive the tractor through the snow once.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,710 Senior Member
    Since I go to the back of the plot by boat and usually hunt with in 200 yds of the boat, I don't have a story.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,916 Senior Member
    Years back my ex-Father in law had a big buck walk under his stand at last light. When he finally came out to the truck (dark night,no moon) he told me about taking the shot and missing. I asked him where he found the arrow and he told me it was stuck in the ground under his stand. I looked at the arrow with a flashlight and found one side of it slimed with blood on one side from about halfway up the shaft to the nock. (Bob was color blind and couldn't see blood - it all looks black to him which can be a bad thing on muddy ground so I did all his blood trailing for him). We went back to his stand and found where the deer was standing when he he shot...nearly directly under the stand..where I found some clipped hair. We found where he hit the ground after his first bound (more hair and a few drops of blood) a couple of steps later it looked like a faucet had been turned on, huge spray of blood on the tall grass and trees. At this point we were on the bank of a stream and confident that the deer was down decided to suspend the search until first light (temps were in the low 30s- no worries about spoiling).

    First thing in the morning, we were back where we had last seen blood and tracks....the area was heavily wooded with a lot of hills...we crossed the stream and immediately picked up blood sign...and spent the next couple of hours following sign...the deer kept heading for the tops of the ridges but each time it looked like he ran out of gas and headed downhill. The bucks tracks finally took us down to the shore of a near by lake (shoulda figured it ) , found where he fell, wallered around in the mud and got back up, and the sign flat disappeared. We cast up and down the shoreline for another hour and found....nothing. We were both standing there scratching our heads when Bob says "what the hell is that out in the middle of the lake?" Sure enough..you could see him floating out there. So, I shucked off my boots and clothes and went after him bare ass....cold wasn't the word for it. Swan out, grabbed an hoof and headed back to shore...got out of the water and Bob mistook me for a girl, then noticed that the deer was HUGE... We found that the arrow had nicked an artery in the bucks neck. Got the thing field dressed and started dragging - tuned out that deer had travel over a mile before going down. Stopped off at the feed & grain on the way home to get him weighed at hust over 200 pounds...dressed...

    I have never got naked to go after a deer since...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 7,396 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Holy crap. You didn't slide did you?

    Bout 6 inches, it was a wild ride let me tell you. Big time pucker factor. I couldnt get beck on the tractor for weeks.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    Years back my ex-Father in law had a big buck walk under his stand at last light. When he finally came out to the truck (dark night,no moon) he told me about taking the shot and missing. I asked him where he found it and he told me it was stuck in the ground under his stand. When I looked at the arrow with a flashlight and found on side of it slimed with blood on one side from about halfway up the shaft to the nock. (Bob was color blind and couldn't see blood - it all looks black to him which can be a bad thing on muddy ground so I did all his blood trailing for him). We went back to his stand and found where the deer was standing when he he shot...nearly directly under the stand..where I found some clipped hair. We found where he hit the ground after his first bound (more hair and a few drops of blood) a couple of steps later it looked like a faucet had been turned on, huge spray of blood on the tall grass and trees. At this point we were on the bank of a stream and confident that the deer was down decided to suspend the search until first light (temps were in the low 30s- no worries about spoiling).

    First thing in the morning, we were back where we had last seen blood and tracks....the area was heavily wooded with a lot of hills...we crossed the stream and immediately picked up blood sign...and spent the next couple of hours following sign...the deer kept heading for the tops of the ridges but each time it looked like he ran out of gas and headed downhill. The bucks tracks finally took us down to the shore of a near by lake (shoulda figured it ) , found where he fell, wallered around in the mud and got back up, and the sign flat disappeared. We cast up and down the shoreline for another hour and found....nothing. We were both standing there scratching our heads when Bob says "what the hell is that out in the middle of the lake?" Sure enough..you could see him floating out there. So, I shucked off my boots and clothes and went after him bare ass....cold wasn't the word for it. Swan out, grabbed an hoof and headed back to shore...got out of the water and Bob mistook me for a girl, then noticed that the deer was HUGE... We found that the arrow had nicked an artery in the bucks neck. Got the thing field dressed and started dragging - tuned out that deer had travel over a mile before going down. Stopped off at the feed & grain on the way home to get him weighed at hust over 200 pounds...dressed...

    I have never got naked to go after a deer since...

    That beats anything I ever had to do hands down.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,109 Senior Member
    On the basis that duck & geese are game ..............

    Many years ago I was out duck shooting on the harbour in my 10' ally boat. I had a 9.9hp Johnson outboard fitted which, with the weight of decoys and shooting gear allowed it to plane with a top speed of about 20 mph.

    In those days, Canada Geese were a rarity in the region and although I had seen a few during previous seasons, none had come within range. I was sitting quietly in the boat packing up my gear as the tide was dropping and I needed to get out of there or I would be staying until the tide came back in about 8 hrs later............when I heard some honking approaching from behind me over the mangroves. I looked up just in time to see a mob of about 7-8 Canada's passing overhead. Grabbing my old Baikal O/U I swung up and connected with 'tail end charlie', knocking quite a few feathers out of him and he set his wings gliding into to water about 200yds out. The rest continued on their way.

    Ahaa I thought to myself, I had finally brought down one of the 'kings' of waterfowl hunting.

    I untied the boat, started the outboard and set off to retrieve it. Got to within about 60yds of it before it struggled off the water. I could tell it was wounded by the way it was flying as its wingbeats were very erratic and it kept bouncing off the water. Running the outboard flat out I slowly gained on it until I thought I was in range then I held the tiller with my knees, raised the O/U and gave it both barrels....again I saw feathers fly but it didn't drop. As I reached for another 2 shells, the tiller slipped and I performed an immediate U-turn at full throttle, almost falling overboard in the process. The goose had in the meantime landed about 300yds away.

    Ok, load up again, get the boat up on the plane and head towards the bird. Got to within about 80yds of it and it got up again. At full throttle our respective speeds where almost evenly matched and it took about 15 minutes to get into what I figured was range. Again I held the tiller with my knees and gave it 2 more barrels of no 4 shot. Same result, feathers flew but it stayed in the air. Once again my knee grip slipped and I did another involuntary U-turn. The goose once again landed about 250yds away.

    Ok, that didn't work so I changed plans. This time I decided I would get to within a few yards of the bird before closing the throttle and taking my time over the shot. And once again, when I got to within about 70yds the goose struggled off the water so I slowly inched up towards it. This time it took about 10 minutes to get to within about 10 yds cos it kept jinking left and right abut finally I got close enough and just as I closed the throttle, it fell out of the sky stone dead.

    WOOHOO! The bird was mine!

    After picking it up I spent a few minutes admiring it...........I had never seen one close up before...........and I then started the outboard to head home. ( I had travelled about 6 miles across the harbour by this stage). After retracing my 'steps' for about 5 minutes, the water got too shallow to take a direct line back to the river channel ( about 3 miles as the crow flies) and I was forced to head further out into the harbour to deep water and make my way home by following a very circuitous route.

    20 mins later, I ran out of petrol.....................

    What followed was 2 hrs of pushing the boat through shallow water until it got too deep, then unshipping the oars and rowing till it got too shallow followed by more walking and rowing until I hit the main river channel about 5 miles from the river mouth. Then followed 2 hrs of rowing against the tide until it took pity on me and turned to give me a push.

    The whole retrieve took about 6 hrs before I got back to the boat ramp.

    I have never worked so bloody hard to retrieve a bird before or since.

    When I plucked the bird I found most of the #4 shot hadn't penetrated its feathers and the few that had were lodged in its stomach. They would have proved fatal in the end so I was glad I had persisted in the retrieval.......................However when I roasted the bird a few weeks later it was so tough I couldn't chew it. I ended up cutting the meat into small pieces, throwing it into a pressure cooker and turning it into goose stew.

    The following year I upgraded to a 15hp Evinrude ( which was well above the max rating for the 10' boat)....................and bought a spare 5 gallon outboard tank which sat under the quarterdeck and added weight up front.......(which it certainly needed with the extra horsepower).
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    This is another tale well beyond anything I've been through.

    Edit.
    I'm left trying to figure which character in the story is the tough old bird. :jester:
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    Last years bull was tough, and took several hours but that was because I was alone for the first half. I shot the bull probably around 9. I don't gut animals, I go in from the back and break them down. That took a few hours to get everything pieced out and bagged up. I got the straps and 1 front quarter done by the time my hunting partner showed up that afternoon. It was cool enough at night I wasn't worried about spoiling, all the parts were in dark timber in the shade anyways. The next morning it took 2 more trips between the 2 of us. 3 quarters and the head (last trip out). It was tough but not grueling, couldn't have been more then 4-500 yards from camp and there was not a lot of elevation change.

    My timberline buck, THAT was tough. He wasn't going to set any records for size or weight, but the fact that it was up around 13k ft above sea level made it that much harder. The hard part was he died beyond a 200 yard wide boulder field I had to jump around on with the quarters on my back. And there was some pretty steep elevation changes. Shot the buck around 8, I was back in camp at about 5.

    Although I think the absolute hardest was Joe's elk. Even with 4 of us that was.....ugh. 1200 ft elevation change in 500 yards, most of that extremely steep.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    early wrote: »
    My Dad retired and moved back to Michigan about 10 years ago. Before that time he cut and I packed. Generally took us 4 hours to finish.

    Been by myself for five elk and one deer. Longest one took 8 hours. Big cow, uphill, steep. Not much to tell really. Struggle, sweat, catch your breath, repeat till done.

    I been working out year round now for 4+ years. Last elk I swung the quarters, hide, hooves n' all over my shoulder and carried them out. Not far, maybe 400 yards to camp, took 4 hours. A bear was shadowing me, but that had no effect on the time.

    If I'd been packing out fresh meat and a bear was following me, either I would have had it out in 30 minutes or one or possibly both of us(me AND the Bear) would have been dead!

    :buff2:......:silly:.......:yikes:

    :rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao:
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    If I'd been packing out fresh meat and a bear was following me, either I would have had it out in 30 minutes or one or possibly both of us(me AND the Bear) would have been dead!

    Were it me, and the bear was brown, he would have had an entire elk to feast upon. Were it black, I'm not sure, but probably the same. :silly:

    I like fun, but I'm not that crazy about adventure.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 11,146 Senior Member
    Hardest track- last years big buck after being shot ran a LONG way, doubling back on its tracks multiple times. I probably tracked it up and down the side of a small canyon by my blind 4-5 times, crossing its own path multiple times. It was maybe a 400 yard track, and it ended with the deer falling off a cliff about 40 yards from where he was shot, just in a different direction than he originally ran.

    Retrieving him was a read chore. Had to drive the truck around the canyon to the road into the canyon, and drag him about 20 yards to the truck
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    OK, which story you want first? They're all true and etched in my memory so deep I'll never forget them.

    Back in 2011, the first year I was on my present lease, I shot a hog and a deer one morning. The hog weighed in excess of 200 pounds. I got the deer in the Suburban ok, but then I went to find the hog. I had shot it at 320 yards and it had run in the brush. I went inside the brush line about 10 feet and there he was as Jerry Clower would say, grave yard dead. After thinking how the hell I was going to get it out of that brush I went to the car and got a rope and tied it through his hind leg and tied the other end around the trailer hitch ball. Then carefully pulled it out into the sendero. Then the work, or futile work, began. I worked my ass off, then I tied the hog up to the Suburban short and pulled it to the gate, hoping I could see somebody to help me heave it into the back. But nobody was there that day. It was a weekday and I was the only one hunting that morning.

    My next plan was to gut the hog, which I would normally do at the barn because we have water there. So I field dressed the hog but still couldn't quite get it up into the back of the car. I didn't have my cooler with me, something I don't go without anymore, and so I didn't want to skin and quarter it. I didn't have a saw (something else I now have in the Suburban at all times)so I didn't think I could cut the head off. Anyway, it was now about 2 P.M. I ried calling everybody I knew that might come to my rescue. I finally called a guy I know that is actually on the lease with me. He said he was working but would come by after work since the lease was between his work and his house. But he wasn't getting off until 6:P.M. He told me there was a block and tackle at the barn that I may could raise the hog with and shove it into the back of the car. So I pulled the hog on the dirt road the 1.9 miles to the barn. It took a little hide off but didn't seem to hurt the meat. However, when I got there the block and tackle wasn't operative. It needed new rope and I didn't have enough with me (something else I have since fixed ). But at least there's water at the barn. So I washed the body cavity out good which also cooled the meat. It was a cool day anyway, and now since I had cleaned it well and washed most of the blood and guts out, it kept the meat from spoiling. I also had the meat in the shade. I also cleaned the deer up and kept it as cool as possible. But I had no place to go and all afternoon to get there, so the wait was on. 6 oclock came and went, no Mark. Finally at 6:30 I saw lights turn off the hiway onto the lease main road. Ahh help at last. Mark had wisely decided to go home first and bring his son Kevin, in case we needed help. That was a good idea because it took all three of us to get than monster in the car. Also, when Mark saw the hog he told me that thing weighed more than any 200 pounds. He thought it was more like 250 or even more. Anyway, all's well that ends well. I got it home, skinned it, quartered it and got it in the freezer by about 10 P.M., took a shower and collapsed in bed.

    We ate some of the deer, but I wasn't ready to make sausage yet. About two months later my freezer got accidentally unplugged and it ruined some deer and all of the hog. I had bleach in the bottom of that cooler for a month before it got the smell out. All that work for nothing!
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    It was a small back bear guys. Not aggressive, just hungry. I told a fellow hunter the tale that afternoon. He went back to my gut pile and took the bruin with one shot from a 300 Weatherby mag.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,109 Senior Member
    early wrote: »
    This is another tale well beyond anything I've been through.

    Edit.
    I'm left trying to figure which character in the story is the tough old bird. :jester:

    The tough old bird wasn't me............That incident happened in 1977 or 78 when I was in my early 20's. If it happened today I would probably drop dead of a heart attack.

    It took 2 weeks back then to get rid of the aches, pains, blisters, and especially the chaffing on my thighs and ass caused by my rubber waders!!!
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,916 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    OK, which story you want first? They're all true and etched in my memory so deep I'll never forget them.

    Back in 2011, the first year I was on my present lease, I shot a hog and a deer one morning. The hog weighed in excess of 200 pounds. I got the deer in the Suburban ok, but then I went to find the hog. I had shot it at 320 yards and it had run in the brush. I went inside the brush line about 10 feet and there he was as Jerry Clower would say, grave yard dead. After thinking how the hell I was going to get it out of that brush I went to the car and got a rope and tied it through his hind leg and tied the other end around the trailer hitch ball. Then carefully pulled it out into the sendero. Then the work, or futile work, began. I worked my ass off, then I tied the hog up to the Suburban short and pulled it to the gate, hoping I could see somebody to help me heave it into the back. But nobody was there that day. It was a weekday and I was the only one hunting that morning.

    My next plan was to gut the hog, which I would normally do at the barn because we have water there. So I field dressed the hog but still couldn't quite get it up into the back of the car. I didn't have my cooler with me, something I don't go without anymore, and so I didn't want to skin and quarter it. I didn't have a saw (something else I now have in the Suburban at all times)so I didn't think I could cut the head off. Anyway, it was now about 2 P.M. I ried calling everybody I knew that might come to my rescue. I finally called a guy I know that is actually on the lease with me. He said he was working but would come by after work since the lease was between his work and his house. But he wasn't getting off until 6:P.M. He told me there was a block and tackle at the barn that I may could raise the hog with and shove it into the back of the car. So I pulled the hog on the dirt road the 1.9 miles to the barn. It took a little hide off but didn't seem to hurt the meat. However, when I got there the block and tackle wasn't operative. It needed new rope and I didn't have enough with me (something else I have since fixed ). But at least there's water at the barn. So I washed the body cavity out good which also cooled the meat. It was a cool day anyway, and now since I had cleaned it well and washed most of the blood and guts out, it kept the meat from spoiling. I also had the meat in the shade. I also cleaned the deer up and kept it as cool as possible. But I had no place to go and all afternoon to get there, so the wait was on. 6 oclock came and went, no Mark. Finally at 6:30 I saw lights turn off the hiway onto the lease main road. Ahh help at last. Mark had wisely decided to go home first and bring his son Kevin, in case we needed help. That was a good idea because it took all three of us to get than monster in the car. Also, when Mark saw the hog he told me that thing weighed more than any 200 pounds. He thought it was more like 250 or even more. Anyway, all's well that ends well. I got it home, skinned it, quartered it and got it in the freezer by about 10 P.M., took a shower and collapsed in bed.

    We ate some of the deer, but I wasn't ready to make sausage yet. About two months later my freezer got accidentally unplugged and it ruined some deer and all of the hog. I had bleach in the bottom of that cooler for a month before it got the smell out. All that work for nothing!

    After a similar adventure, I started carrying a snatch block secured in the front of my pickup bed, two hundred foot lenghts of rope and a piece of 1/2" plywood to use as a ramp when I was hunting by myself. Mechanical advatage is where it's at......
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,973 Senior Member
    I once helped my guide load a pig into the buggy... :jester:
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Another time was when my youngest son, who at the time, was about 21, killed a huge old boar and we couldn't get the truck over a gully. We had to pull that hog by hand about 600 yards and then pull it through the gully. I told him next time if he didn't bring a helicopter don't shoot it if it's inaccessible. That was a major pain.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Jayhawker wrote: »
    After a similar adventure, I started carrying a snatch block secured in the front of my pickup bed, two hundred foot lenghts of rope and a piece of 1/2" plywood to use as a ramp when I was hunting by myself. Mechanical advatage is where it's at......


    That's exactly what I now have too, but I don't have it installed yet.

    I've got a 3000 pound winch and the plywood ready for it. Just keep getting distracted. I guess the distractions will cease when I get in that bind again.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    All of my game retrieval hardships have been self-imposed. I tend towards preparing well for it, then ignoring all of the tools and lifting aids, in favor of saying, "to hell with it, I'll just throw it up on the tail-gate and be done with it." I have a Kawasaki Mule with a winch and enough pulleys and blocks to rig up almost any sort of lifting aid, but I never use them (it's only a whitetail). Old age will eventually make me smarter, I reckon. The last time was almost a failure, and my back still hurts from it.
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    I was hunting alone on Hardscrabble Mt., 1969, 4th elk season, weather was real cold and snowing, I had driven my Bronco up a jeep trail and had worked (hiked) my way across 2 drainages, lots of sign but no elk, started thru a heavy stand of black timber, found some beds, and there he stood almost broadside looking away from me at something down slope, shot him thru the heart and lungs with the .358, he was maybe 70yds away, he went down, got up stumbled a few times and went down for good. He was a nice 5pt. bull, I gutted, Quartered, and cut the head and neck off, and cut off the legs, first trip out I carried the head/neck and backstraps, 2ed. and 3ed trip were the hind quarters, 4th. and 5th. were the fronts and the meat from the ribs. I shot him about 11:00, I got back to camp after midnight. Each trip in and out seemed to get longer, by the time I was done I was sure he was 20 miles out, checking the topo the next day, in a straight line it was only about 1 1/2 miles.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,930 Senior Member
    jaywapti wrote: »
    I was hunting alone on Hardscrabble Mt., 1969, 4th elk season, weather was real cold and snowing, I had driven my Bronco up a jeep trail and had worked (hiked) my way across 2 drainages, lots of sign but no elk, started thru a heavy stand of black timber, found some beds, and there he stood almost broadside looking away from me at something down slope, shot him thru the heart and lungs with the .358, he was maybe 70yds away, he went down, got up stumbled a few times and went down for good. He was a nice 5pt. bull, I gutted, Quartered, and cut the head and neck off, and cut off the legs, first trip out I carried the head/neck and backstraps, 2ed. and 3ed trip were the hind quarters, 4th. and 5th. were the fronts and the meat from the ribs. I shot him about 11:00, I got back to camp after midnight. Each trip in and out seemed to get longer, by the time I was done I was sure he was 20 miles out, checking the topo the next day, in a straight line it was only about 1 1/2 miles.

    JAY

    There's a Hardscrabble mountain about 15 miles from were I live, near Canon City. It's in the Wet Mountains. Is that the same one, or is there more than one? If it's the same, I know how rugged that country is.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 3,890 Senior Member
    Last elk I killed before leaving Colorado I had to drag about 400 yards down hill right into the back of my truck. Does that count:jester:

    Sako
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    There's a Hardscrabble mountain about 15 miles from were I live, near Canon City. It's in the Wet Mountains. Is that the same one, or is there more than one? If it's the same, I know how rugged that country is.

    No, its south of Gypsum , off I-70

    FYI, I lived S.W. of you In Westcliffe, Custer Co.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,075 Senior Member
    Hardest was probably the doe the wife killed 11/27/2012. At the time I hadn't settled on a low recoiling load in her 308 yet and I was loading 140gr Horn FTX in it. (Since then I've settled on the 125 Ballistic Tips and haven't had that long of a tracking job on any of her deer since)

    She made a good hit on the doe, but there was very little blood, and it ran off the back of the field, down a steel hill. While tracking it down the hill is when I stepped into a stump hole while hanging onto a sapling to steady myself and tore up my shoulder. Finally found the doe and started dragging her up and down the hills and across the "wash" from a creek, when my nephew (who lives on the property) and his buddy called out from the field asking if I/we needed help. I called back yes. The came down and I got the two strapping young men to drag her back up while I nursed my shoulder.
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    I've already figured that out. Work smart, not painfully. Of course I say that as I'm nursing a sore as hell back myself.

    I had it figured out, at about your age. Unfortunately, feeling the need for 'expediency' still trumps common sense, all too often. I still lift things that I should not, because I always have, and because I still can. But there is a price to pay for it, and I usually end up paying more than I intended.

    It's kinda like when you are 20, or so, and have such a monumental hangover that you swear you will never let it happen again. By Friday night, you have forgotten about it, and it takes another couple of years to refuse the temptation on a regular basis. Even then, you may backslide occasionally, for several more years.
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