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Do you ever hunt by yourself?

JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior MemberPosts: 7,930 Senior Member
I don't mean just go out for a day and come home at night, but spend several days camping and hunting, alone.
Jerry

Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
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Replies

  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,557 Senior Member
    No, but I'd like to. If I ever get to fulfill my elk hunting dream, camping will probably be a given.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,148 Senior Member
    I haven't, but I would, depending on the conditions. No doubt that the risk of getting injured while hunting or fishing alone always crosses my mind when I'm alone in the Rockies. I once drove 2.5 hours solo to a new lake, on a 4x4-required trail in Utah at an exhaustingly slow speed, only to realize that the hike down to the lake I wanted to fish was just too dangerous to attempt with a fully loaded backpack. Loose stones, very steep decent and other hazards put a flash of my family in my head that I couldn't shake. Despite the total of 5 hours wasted going in and out, I decided not to attempt it.

    Conversely, I have gone into other lakes and mountain passes by myself with camping gear, dehydrated food and fire-starting equipment not the least bit deterred because the setting was a lot more tame. As I get older, I am strongly considering buying one of those satellite messengers to keep in a pocket to rest my head a little easier in case something bad happens. I usually have friends with me when I hunt even now, but if my buddies bail on a multi-day hunt for whatever reason, you'll have a hard time talking me out of going just because I have nobody with me. That's when having at least some tether to the civilized world provides a little reassurance.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,930 Senior Member
    Six-Gun wrote: »
    I haven't, but I would, depending on the conditions. No doubt that the risk of getting injured while hunting or fishing alone always crosses my mind when I'm alone in the Rockies. I once drove 2.5 hours solo to a new lake, on a 4x4-required trail in Utah at an exhaustingly slow speed, only to realize that the hike down to the lake I wanted to fish was just too dangerous to attempt with a fully loaded backpack. Loose stones, very steep decent and other hazards put a flash of my family in my head that I couldn't shake. Despite the total of 5 hours wasted going in and out, I decided not to attempt it.

    Conversely, I have gone into other lakes and mountain passes by myself with camping gear, dehydrated food and fire-starting equipment not the least bit deterred because the setting was a lot more tame. As I get older, I am strongly considering buying one of those satellite messengers to keep in a pocket to rest my head a little easier in case something bad happens. I usually have friends with me when I hunt even now, but if my buddies bail for whatever reason, you'll have a hard time talking me out of going just because I have nobody with me. That's when having at least some tether to the civilized world provides a little reassurance.

    Luis, the times I've done it there's always been other hunters in the area. I suppose if you hike/backpack into a remote area alone that would be an entirely different experience. I've never done that and don't expect I ever will.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,148 Senior Member
    Yeah, these solo trips I am talking about are exactly that in the most literal sense: in the middle of nowhere, often on random fishing trips without any particular hunting season overlapping that would at least have an occasional passerby come through my area. It's definitely a real risk. That's where the reality of having a family and getting older have started to creep in. Granted, with my life insurance, I'm worth more dead than alive, but that certainly won't make anyone feel much better if I do take a bad fall, get eaten by a furry woodland animal or make it home alive but paralyzed. However, if I'm going fishing/hunting solo and staying at a marked campsite with regular ranger and/or other human traffic and the conditions aren't extreme, I don't carry anywhere near the worry. It's just that the draw of occasional solitude is just so strong for me that I am forced to temper it as time goes by.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,973 Senior Member
    While I enjoy solitude when fishing off the boat, I feel hunting has more camaraderie, and I have always hunted with at least one other person.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 23,972 Senior Member
    Yes. I prefer it.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,459 Senior Member
    Sometimes but not often
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    I go on multi day hunts alone, but often encounter and converse with other hunters. Generally, but not always a great class of people.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    early wrote: »
    I go on multi day hunts alone, but often encounter and converse with other hunters. Generally, but not always a great class of people.

    Yes I have. But now since I hunt 19 miles from my front door, no. I go out for a morning or evening. When I hog hunt at night I go out and park the Suburban up against a mott of trees and watch my feeder from about 150 yards distance. When I was on my last lease I would go up and camp for a few days by myself. But I never would think about doing that in the Rocky Mountains. You get lost or hurt up there it could be the end of you. More people die of hypothermia in places like that than anything. I want somebody near by.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,930 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Yes I have. But now since I hunt 19 miles from my front door, no. I go out for a morning or evening. When I hog hunt at night I go out and park the Suburban up against a mott of trees and watch my feeder from about 150 yards distance. When I was on my last lease I would go up and camp for a few days by myself. But I never would think about doing that in the Rocky Mountains. You get lost or hurt up there it could be the end of you. More people die of hypothermia in places like that than anything. I want somebody near by.

    Snake, the Rockies is where I've hunted alone, and there's always been other hunters in the area. If you get hurt, you should be able to find help. If you get lost, take a good GPS unit and know how to use it.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    I have done it for a day and a night, because I went a day early, for that specific purpose. But, it has always been in advance of other hunters showing up, so I always knew help was coming, if I did need it. I would have done it when I was younger, but probably not in bear country. I have always liked to be where bears aren't.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,708 Senior Member
    Never
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    Yes, but never after I had the heart attack in 06, when hunting in the west, not unusual for me to set up my base camp than pack in for 4 - 5 days to a good area and set up a spike camp, I usually go in the day before the season starts. I do tell someone where I'll be and approx. when I'm coming out. I don't carry a GPS, just a topo and 3 good compass's. I try to get far enough off the beaten trail and away from the yahoos that think if they cant see the road there 10 miles in.

    In the east, very rarely.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 11,146 Senior Member
    Every once in a while
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,916 Senior Member
    Used to..a lot, when I was younger...but most times I prefer to have someone along, just to share the experience, do dishes and help drag if necessary..
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 23,972 Senior Member
    I'm not what you would call a, "people person". Preferring to be alone or with one of a handful of folks the I can coexist with for lengthy periods of time.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Used to ever so often way back when I was a youngster. Liked to poke around in the mountains a little east of home. Maybe 3-4 nights at most, and usually took a few #1 Victor Jump Traps for coons. What I have done is a fair amount of forest inventory work staying alone in the woods for 4-5 days/nights at a time. Did this once staying alone 5 days and 4 nights a week for 6 weeks on a big timber inventory. But haven't done that since the mid 80's, and I'm too old for that kinda stuff now!
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,557 Senior Member
    Zee wrote: »
    I'm not what you would call a, "people person". Preferring to be alone or with one of a handful of folks the I can coexist with for lengthy periods of time.

    This.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,557 Senior Member
    I do all my coyote hunting alone. I've yet to do anything I'd call true camping, though. Remote trips to pasture land is common. I'm usually not more than 2 miles from the truck, but I'm easily an hour or more from advanced medical treatment.

    A good GSW first aid kit is a must, including a self-applied tourniquet.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    I've done a couple solo hunts now, I rather enjoy it. At the same time, nothing like a good hunting camp with good people at the end of a hard day. I mix it up every other year, more or less, between solo and group.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    I've done a couple solo hunts now, I rather enjoy it. At the same time, nothing like a good hunting camp with good people at the end of a hard day. I mix it up every other year, more or less, between solo and group.

    I realise now with today's technology a mountain hunt is not near as hazardous as it once was. No telling how many lives the GPS has and will save. Especially those of us who live in the flat coastal plains that are rather barren of trees and hills and aren't used to the hazards presented in mountainous areas.

    But I still woudn't want to go it alone. Too many things can happen. Falls, Snake Bites, bears, hehehe! OK So I'm a flat lander wuss.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,930 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    But I still woudn't want to go it alone. Too many things can happen. Falls, Snake Bites, bears, hehehe! OK So I'm a flat lander wuss.

    You left out lions and tigers, oh my!
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    You left out lions and tigers, oh my!

    Oh yeah, mountain lions and I suppose if you have a bucket of black paint you could paint some stripes on one and call it a tiger.


    ......:silly:.....:yikes:.....:bang:
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,689 Senior Member
    I refuse to engage any outdoor activity by myself. Fortunately for those who do, currently there's a plethora of tech aids and tools that can ensure a chance of survival if anything goes wrong, even in the most harsh conditions....even one of those modern high-output lead flashlight can increase your chances of getting aid a lot!
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    I realise now with today's technology a mountain hunt is not near as hazardous as it once was. No telling how many lives the GPS has and will save. Especially those of us who live in the flat coastal plains that are rather barren of trees and hills and aren't used to the hazards presented in mountainous areas.

    But I still woudn't want to go it alone. Too many things can happen. Falls, Snake Bites, bears, hehehe! OK So I'm a flat lander wuss.


    Yea, you have to keep it in the front of your mind to be extra careful when alone. A LOT can go wrong with just the tinniest mistake. A trip crossing a log, a misplaced step, slip of the knife, can all be catastrophic. When I go out alone I make sure someone knows exactly where I plan to be and when I plan to return. That was imprinted on me very early in hunters ED class. They showed us a video that went over a couple of real life deaths in the woods. One was a fishing column writer from a paper who went out to a new secret location. He slipped and went under, ended up dying from hypothermia. Took a long time to find him because he hadn't told anyone where he was going.

    I got lost a few years ago chasing a herd of elk. I was very familiar with the area that I was in, but I had never gone this way through the woods instead of a trail, got pretty mixed up. When it started getting dark I won't lie, that was some scary poop. But kept the wits about me, climbed up to the highest point I could find and I was able to recognize a few drainage hills I knew like the back of my hand. Walked down a hill in the dark (lots of fun) and was able to find the trail back to the cabin. Probably hiked 15 miles that day.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Yea, you have to keep it in the front of your mind to be extra careful when alone. A LOT can go wrong with just the tinniest mistake. A trip crossing a log, a misplaced step, slip of the knife, can all be catastrophic. When I go out alone I make sure someone knows exactly where I plan to be and when I plan to return. That was imprinted on me very early in hunters ED class. They showed us a video that went over a couple of real life deaths in the woods. One was a fishing column writer from a paper who went out to a new secret location. He slipped and went under, ended up dying from hypothermia. Took a long time to find him because he hadn't told anyone where he was going.

    I got lost a few years ago chasing a herd of elk. I was very familiar with the area that I was in, but I had never gone this way through the woods instead of a trail, got pretty mixed up. When it started getting dark I won't lie, that was some scary poop. But kept the wits about me, climbed up to the highest point I could find and I was able to recognize a few drainage hills I knew like the back of my hand. Walked down a hill in the dark (lots of fun) and was able to find the trail back to the cabin. Probably hiked 15 miles that day.

    15 miles in the mountains at any altitude above 5000 FASL is like 50 miles down here on the coast for one of us flatland wusses. The last time I went on a trek with my sons at the Scout Ranch out of Cimarron NM when I was about 43 years old, when I came home we were starting a big maintenance turn around at the plant. Lots of climbing tall vessels and turning big block valves. I was in such good shape I hardly broke a sweat. Took me a couple weeks to lose that level of condition. Once you get acclimated to altitude you are superman at Sea Level for awhile.

    I think that if I were an Olympic athlete and was going to train for the Olympics or just a big meet, I'd do it someplace about 10,000 FASL for about a month.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    Walked down a hill in the dark (lots of fun) and was able to find the trail back to the cabin. Probably hiked 15 miles that day.

    Unless I know I'm really close to camp or Jeep, I'll stay put and get an early start the next morning.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    jaywapti wrote: »
    Unless I know I'm really close to camp or Jeep, I'll stay put and get an early start the next morning.

    JAY

    Yep, I'd probably do that too. But I'm a flat land wuss,...:rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao:

    Seriously, that's what the survival pro's recommend. If you're really lost you sit down and admit to yourself you are lost. Just make sure you told someone where you were going. Then build a fire. Try to stay dry and as warm as possible. If it looks like it will rain or snow, try to build some kind of improvised shelter. A piece of polyethylene about 8x8 rolled up in a small back pack works good.

    Also, always bring water or the means of condensing water out of the air (Of course there's not much water in the air at 10,000 FASL Unless it's raining) and some purification tablets. You don't want Montezuma's Revenge, it could dehydrate you. Coca Cola or any sugary soft drink is a great survival drink if you brought some along, because it has sugar in it. But I've heard some of these experts say if you have beer along, pour it out. I've heard others say Bull S..t on that because beer has calories. The truth is alcohol can dehydrate. So unless you have an unexhaustable supply of clean water, don't drink it. And don't use that sugar in a soft drink to give you energy for hiking when you're lost. You may just dig yourself deeper into a hole by getting farther from civilization. Stay in one place, because if you told somebody where you were going, they'll find you.

    I know what some are thinking. What would a flat lander know about hiking in the mountains. I had this drummed into my head by professionals for 15 years. The director of the Texas Hunter Education Department of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department was an experienced Colorado hunter, Steve Hall.

    And I had some experience going to Philmont with the Scouts. Not much, but enough to realize there was something to what the so called experts told me. But my experience was different than yours MHS, like you said, you were familiar with the terrain. But that should show us here that even someone who knows the area can get disoriented. But you evidently knew the area well enough that you could keep from getting totally lost. Big difference than being a newby to the area.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    Having hunted, backpacked, camped, and lived in the mountains for 55+ years I have some opinions on what to carry, instead of a poly or canvas tarp, I carry a rip stop nylon rain fly from a small 4 man back packers tent, it folds/ rolls up smaller than poly and only weigh's a few oz. that and 50 - 100' of para cord and you have a good shelter. Also a way to start a fire, quickly, I carry 4 - 5 Bic lighters in my shirt pocket so they don't get cold, a bunch of waterproof strike anywhere matches (Ohio blue Tip) and an instant fire starter, Mil. fuel tabs, I make my own its kinda like a stick napalm. Just my .02 cents.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    jaywapti wrote: »
    Having hunted, backpacked, camped, and lived in the mountains for 55+ years I have some opinions on what to carry, instead of a poly or canvas tarp, I carry a rip stop nylon rain fly from a small 4 man back packers tent, it folds/ rolls up smaller than poly and only weigh's a few oz. that and 50 - 100' of para cord and you have a good shelter. Also a way to start a fire, quickly, I carry 4 - 5 Bic lighters in my shirt pocket so they don't get cold, a bunch of waterproof strike anywhere matches (Ohio blue Tip) and an instant fire starter, Mil. fuel tabs, I make my own its kinda like a stick napalm. Just my .02 cents.

    JAY

    Jay, you have some good ideas there. Next time I'll find somebody like you to teach me. This stuff could save your life. Also, I've seen tight fitting thin but insulated body suits that hold your body heat in.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
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