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Sunday 31 July---A Sad Day For The British

woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior MemberPosts: 2,725 Senior Member
Black Tot Day. The LAST rum issue to British Sailors aboard ship :tissue:

Sorry about that, shush!

Replies

  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    If they would have taken their Tea away, there would have been a revolt!
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • earlyearly Senior Member Thornton COPosts: 4,950 Senior Member
    No rum.

    What's next?
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • shushshush Senior Member This Sceptical Isle.Posts: 6,259 Senior Member
    The New Zealand lads kept theirs until 1990.

    My Dad did enjoy a tot of this;

    woods_zpsf2748510.jpg

    with his regular pint of Mild.
  • olesniperolesniper Senior Member Franklin, Ky.Posts: 3,767 Senior Member
    The original black tot rum is still available...........if you have a co-signer.

    black-tot-last-consignment-british-royal-navy-rum-the-caribbean-10623129_zpspglqoeve.jpg

    Here, it's around $1,150 or so.
    Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
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  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    $1,150. for about a quart? WOW.....That's expensive! Heck, all I get for mine is $32.00 a quart....am I selling too cheap?
  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member South DakotaPosts: 2,040 Senior Member
    No more 'drams of rum'......what a bummer!
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Under a logPosts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Sailors being sailors, that won't 'stop up no holes' as to getting a nip at sea. I've seen, and been a party to, getting 'special sea stores' aboard ship. Never underestimate the ingenuity of a sailor getting a nip of grog aboard ship! :roll2:
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  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Mike is totally correct, and I can speak from experience having being a "White Hat" aboard ship. And I can tell you with certainty that being commissioned and living aboard ship in Officer's Country does have its advantages :tooth:
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member crusted in sandPosts: 5,797 Senior Member
    olesniper wrote: »
    The original black tot rum is still available...........if you have a co-signer.

    black-tot-last-consignment-british-royal-navy-rum-the-caribbean-10623129_zpspglqoeve.jpg

    Here, it's around $1,150 or so.

    I've seen it for around 900.00 a bottle but from what I've read, it's rare but not very tasty. The high price is because it was last made in 1976. If you want a truly delicious sipping rum, you can get a bottle of Appleton's 21for around 100 bucks and enjoy one of the tastiest rums in existence.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,750 Senior Member
    The British Navy ended the rum ration in 1970, a few years before many here were born. The ration was a hefty 2.3 ounces of rum issued at about noon...which had to encourage some bad habits. Also, I believe sailors could save up and get a larger ration later on and get drunk. I always thought it was issued in the evening, but hey...
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member crusted in sandPosts: 5,797 Senior Member
    I misspoke, after some further digging around I learned that the true period of the distillation is unknown but is suspected of being in the 1940's. That makes it even more rare but doesn't make it taste any better which is odd in that rums can really mellow with age.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Under a logPosts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Mike is totally correct, and I can speak from experience having being a "White Hat" aboard ship. And I can tell you with certainty that being commissioned and living aboard ship in Officer's Country does have its advantages :tooth:

    Don't forget the stuff in Sick Bay. Doc dispensed some good stuff down there to patients.

    And that 'torpedo fluid' consisting of PGA had to be watched closely. Those sonar geeks playing with their torpedo launchers could get 'interesting'.

    Just a FYI about 'special sea stores' coming aboard. Those bottles of Scope, Listerine, and other mouthwashes that came straight across the quarterdeck didn't necessarily contain what the label said. Food coloring is a wonderful thing. :roll2:
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  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Manistee Natl ForestPosts: 18,280 Senior Member
    Gene L wrote: »
    The British Navy ended the rum ration in 1970, a few years before many here were born. The ration was a hefty 2.3 ounces of rum issued at about noon...which had to encourage some bad habits. Also, I believe sailors could save up and get a larger ration later on and get drunk. I always thought it was issued in the evening, but hey...

    6 bells in the forenoon watch (11 a.m.)
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Ship's bells! interesting point there, Jay!

    Everybody probably knows, but time is told aboard ship by the bells that ring in the ship's clock. At midnight it's 8 bells, and at 12:30 AM it's 1 bell, and every 30 minutes another bell is added until it gets up to 4 AM when it's again 8 bells. Then it starts over, and at 4:30 AM it's 1 bell again repeating the cycle every 4 hours. A watch (period of duty or work) aboard ship is normally 4 hours, or 8 bells by the clock. That's the way it is in both the British and the American Navies with this one exception:

    In the British Navy at 1730 hours, which would be 5:30 PM in the afternoon, only ONE bell is struck by the clock for this reason: Somewhere way back in the 1700's aboard a British Man of War sailing vessel, the crew had planned a mutiny which was to start at 3 bells of the afternoon watch, or 1730 hours--5:30 PM. The ship's officers were tipped off, and at 3 bells, to confuse the mutineers, only one bell was struck and the mutiny was aborted. Tradition in our Navy as well as in the British Navy, is very strong! 'Least it used to be. Sadly, modern technology has so changed traditional work habits and traditions aboard ship that our and the Brit's Navy is not what it was just a generation ago when I first went aboard ship in the mid-1950's :tissue:
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,244 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    I misspoke, after some further digging around I learned that the true period of the distillation is unknown but is suspected of being in the 1940's. That makes it even more rare but doesn't make it taste any better which is odd in that rums can really mellow with age.
    They will age/mellow/acquire character sitting in oak, but if they are sitting in glass bottles or something all it does is get older in years.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
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