I might be able to dove hunt at the ranch after all!

FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior MemberPosts: 5,342 Senior Member
A little while ago, I went to let the horses out and when I slammed the gate to the pasture, about 20 to 30 doves took off from the next door neighbor's property. We have tons of doves fly over our place but I don't want to litter the pasture with lead shot as the horses graze out there all day and would vacuum up the occasional pellet. The neighbor let's us use his land as he doesn't live there and just uses the barns to store all his junk cars. I believe I'm going to hunt doves next door.
snake284 wrote: »
For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
.

Replies

  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    That would be fun.
    Im still trying to learn how to shoot them clay discs with my shotgun. Ive made some improvement but I still suck.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 8,205 Senior Member
    Dove hunting is fun, but I will be honest and say that I suck at it.
    I ejected a lot more spent shells than birds I picked up. Good Luck and have fun
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 1,352 Senior Member
    Enjoy, it's great fun and even better eating!
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 7,569 Senior Member
    early wrote: »
    That would be fun.
    Im still trying to learn how to shoot them clay discs with my shotgun. Ive made some improvement but I still suck.

    Clay targets are easy to 'kill'. Fire 2 shots at them, watch where they land ....then go stomp on them.

    Last time out on clay birds I killed 150 straight. I dropped a box of them off the trailer I was towing behind the quad bike as I was delivering them to the trap house.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,342 Senior Member
    Jeff in TX wrote: »
    Enjoy, it's great fun and even better eating!

    When I lived in Texas, I did a lot of bird hunting as just about all my friends had family land to hunt on. Since I moved back to Florida in 94, the only place to dove hunt around here is the Eglin Reservation and that can be very complicated and you're not even allowed to hunt before noon. In Texas, we used to finish hunting by around 10:00 AM. I had a good friend who's family had a section of land just west of Abilene and every year we would camp out there during the one weekend where dove, duck, and quail season overlapped. We would shoot doves at first light over the stock tanks, then shoot mallards and pintails when they started flying, go back to camp and have breakfast, then beat the brush for quail, head back to camp for lunch, then hunt quail again. Toward dusk, we would head back to the stock tanks for more doves. Talk about getting a bird hunting fix!
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,437 Senior Member
    Dove hunting is an excuse to shoot a shotgun in the air a whole bunch of time, run out of ammo, then start drinking beer at 9:30
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,158 Senior Member
    bullsi1911 wrote: »
    Dove hunting is an excuse to shoot a shotgun in the air a whole bunch of time, run out of ammo, then start drinking beer at 9:30

    ^THIS^

    I skipped my west Texas dove hunt, this time, to save more of my 'hunting dollars' for whitetails, this year. But, out of the crew I usually hunt with, there are more of this type hunters than hard-core bird hunters. The nice thing about dove hunting, if the doves are there, is that you can work just exactly as hard as you want to.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,141 Senior Member
    I found the best ammo-saving technique when dove hunting- - - -mount the empty gun, swing through the bird, yell "BANG" and wait for the next bird to fly by. Same hit-to-shot ratio, and lots less ammo wasted! Also, I got just as many dirty looks from the GSP as when I was actually firing!
    Jerry
    Hide and wail in terror, Eloi- - - -We Morlocks are on the hunt!
    ASK-HOLE Someone who asks for advice and always does something opposite
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,267 Senior Member
    Dove hunting around here is either hot or cold. Sometimes you can knock em down with a fly swatter, then sometimes you go to sleep waiting on one to fly by. How good it is depends largely on when it rained last and your location. If you're sitting by a water tank and it's been a dry year, you'll think they're reshooting the movie "The Birds" by Alfred Hitchcock. But if it's been raining you may see a few about 300 yards away it seems.

    There's places in Texas where you can get a limit just as fast as you can pull the trigger, such as south of San Antonio. Around Floresville, Charlotte, Poteet, Nixon , there's dove everywhere in the early fall. Once we were hunting out of Charlotte and in a weekend three of us killed 140. Back then there were more Generous limits. I was shooting my dad's old Model 31 Remington and I had that barrel smoking. Those were some good times.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,342 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Dove hunting around here is either hot or cold. Sometimes you can knock em down with a fly swatter, then sometimes you go to sleep waiting on one to fly by. How good it is depends largely on when it rained last and your location.


    Doves are migratory and like ducks and geese, they follow the same flyways every year. If your hunting area happens to be along a flyway, you'll get to see lots of birds and if it's not directly along a flyway, you'll just see random wayward birds.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,267 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    Doves are migratory and like ducks and geese, they follow the same flyways every year. If your hunting area happens to be along a flyway, you'll get to see lots of birds and if it's not directly along a flyway, you'll just see random wayward birds.

    I know they're migratory. That's why I say South of San Antonio. That's in a major Flyway for them. Here, we're on the edge of that flyway. Sometimes there's more than other times. But they're never as thick as Just south of San Antonio. Well, let me correct that. It's really South Southwest. We are more South Southeast.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,158 Senior Member
    Folks, here's my take on dove hunting in Texas - doves are everywhere (in Texas). Yes, you can go out in the country almost anywhere and get shots at 2-3 doves. If you have access to grain fields, they may be thick as flies, but the hunters usually are, too. Otherwise, unless you have an endless supply of doves moving south, they will disappear when you start shooting at them, and most won't come back, leaving you with long lulls between shots. There are probably as many doves where I live as there are anywhere. The problem is that if there are too many water sources, they will leave and not come back. I have never gotten a limit, hunting this way.

    For years, I have been driving 400 miles west to hunt on the prairie, because of the lack of water supplies they can go to in the early mornings and evenings. Where I hunt, the doves are plentiful due to some scrappy little prairie weed that produces seeds that they like, AND the water sources are few and far between. A functioning windmill with a little earthen tank (pond?) to catch the water is perfect, especially if there are a few trees for them to roost in, nearby. They will feed on the prairie during the day, and go to water in the evening, in the hundreds, and from every direction. I can set out my MOJO and a few decoys, and wear proper camo, and they will absolutely swarm it, with about 30 minutes to an hour of shooting time left.

    I usually sit on a bucket till I knock one down, but rarely ever get to return to it, because I just shoot from wherever I picked up the last bird. I have to discipline myself not to shoot another bird until I have picked up the last one - otherwise, I will lose track of the downed birds and will end up wasting some, which I dislike doing. I also discipline myself to look for the collared doves that don't count against your bag limit. Numerous times I have killed a limit of mourning doves and had nearly as many collared doves, which taste just as good and are a little bit easier to hit.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,267 Senior Member
    bisley wrote: »
    Folks, here's my take on dove hunting in Texas - doves are everywhere (in Texas). Yes, you can go out in the country almost anywhere and get shots at 2-3 doves. If you have access to grain fields, they may be thick as flies, but the hunters usually are, too. Otherwise, unless you have an endless supply of doves moving south, they will disappear when you start shooting at them, and most won't come back, leaving you with long lulls between shots. There are probably as many doves where I live as there are anywhere. The problem is that if there are too many water sources, they will leave and not come back. I have never gotten a limit, hunting this way.

    For years, I have been driving 400 miles west to hunt on the prairie, because of the lack of water supplies they can go to in the early mornings and evenings. Where I hunt, the doves are plentiful due to some scrappy little prairie weed that produces seeds that they like, AND the water sources are few and far between. A functioning windmill with a little earthen tank (pond?) to catch the water is perfect, especially if there are a few trees for them to roost in, nearby. They will feed on the prairie during the day, and go to water in the evening, in the hundreds, and from every direction. I can set out my MOJO and a few decoys, and wear proper camo, and they will absolutely swarm it, with about 30 minutes to an hour of shooting time left.

    I usually sit on a bucket till I knock one down, but rarely ever get to return to it, because I just shoot from wherever I picked up the last bird. I have to discipline myself not to shoot another bird until I have picked up the last one - otherwise, I will lose track of the downed birds and will end up wasting some, which I dislike doing. I also discipline myself to look for the collared doves that don't count against your bag limit. Numerous times I have killed a limit of mourning doves and had nearly as many collared doves, which taste just as good and are a little bit easier to hit.

    You're probably right about a lot of doves in Texas. I think moreso than some other states. But that's probably because one of the main flight paths of their migration goes through Texas. However, I believe there's higher concentrations of them to the western part of the state. I know I have never seen doves so thick here as are around Charlotte Texas. Now granted, I've only hunted there in the early fall in the middle of their mass migration. But there's still a lot of doves most any place you go in Texas. Two things can limit you. One is water. If there's too much fresh water they will be spread out over the whole county and you wont' have as many shots. Another problem is trees. If you have a lot of mesquite or live oak they love to sit in both. If you're walking around looking for them, you will hear a lot more of them than you will see. They will hear you coming and keep flying from one tree to the next just out of range. I've done this and you can hear them taking off out of a tree where you don't have a clear shot. They will fly from one tree to the next and cause you to walk your ass off trying to get a shot to no avail. The best way to hunt like that is with a bunch of people 4 or 5 driving and the rest hold up in a clear spot between the trees. Even the drivers will get some shots because when you shoot you will turn many of them back. It not only drives them, it keeps them flying and sometimes in circles. But two people won't have a lot of luck doing this.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,342 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    You're probably right about a lot of doves in Texas. I think moreso than some other states. But that's probably because one of the main flight paths of their migration goes through Texas. However, I believe there's higher concentrations of them to the western part of the state. I know I have never seen doves so thick here as are around Charlotte Texas. Now granted, I've only hunted there in the early fall in the middle of their mass migration. But there's still a lot of doves most any place you go in Texas. Two things can limit you. One is water. If there's too much fresh water they will be spread out over the whole county and you wont' have as many shots. Another problem is trees. If you have a lot of mesquite or live oak they love to sit in both. If you're walking around looking for them, you will hear a lot more of them than you will see. They will hear you coming and keep flying from one tree to the next just out of range. I've done this and you can hear them taking off out of a tree where you don't have a clear shot. They will fly from one tree to the next and cause you to walk your ass off trying to get a shot to no avail. The best way to hunt like that is with a bunch of people 4 or 5 driving and the rest hold up in a clear spot between the trees. Even the drivers will get some shots because when you shoot you will turn many of them back. It not only drives them, it keeps them flying and sometimes in circles. But two people won't have a lot of luck doing this.


    Far be it from me to question your dove hunting knowledge but I'm sure that you know how good a dove's eyesight is and chasing them all over the countryside is not an effective way to hunt them. If you find a flyway with a little traffic, try sitting still within range and waiting for birds to pass through. Unless of course you can run faster than they can fly.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 3,190 Senior Member
    We have dove here all year. Yes, they are migratory, but apparently plenty of them decide it's not too cold here and stick around. Which is why we have two seasons here. Sept 1-30 and Dec 3-Jan 1. My place sits right on a flyway. We used to sit in the front yard and shoot them as they flew by. Now we have neighbors that have moved in too close with horses and such and we don't want problems with spooking a horse through a fence, so we go elsewhere. Plenty of dairies and stockyards and water holes to sit on and shoot plenty of dove. A limit of fat, grain fed white wings makes a good meal....
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,267 Senior Member
    Well guess what? I just paid for my grandson and I to go on a dove hunt on the first. Not only a hunt, but also a barbecue and drawings for prizes, one of which is a shotgun. If you don't want to hunt, you can just shoot trap and skeet. Knowing this part of the country it will be a combination of the two called Country Doubles. We shoot Country Doubles at most of these events. It's kind of a Texas Tradition. You have a low bird on the left and a high bird on the right that come out on your sides and fly straight away. I'm hell on that low bird, but not so much on the high one. It's usually almost out of range by the time you get a shot off. You have to be very quick to get them both. But I'm not going to shoot the clay birds. I want to hunt.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,342 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Well guess what? I just paid for my grandson and I to go on a dove hunt on the first. Not only a hunt, but also a barbecue and drawings for prizes, one of which is a shotgun. If you don't want to hunt, you can just shoot trap and skeet. Knowing this part of the country it will be a combination of the two called Country Doubles. We shoot Country Doubles at most of these events. It's kind of a Texas Tradition. You have a low bird on the left and a high bird on the right that come out on your sides and fly straight away. I'm hell on that low bird, but not so much on the high one. It's usually almost out of range by the time you get a shot off. You have to be very quick to get them both. But I'm not going to shoot the clay birds. I want to hunt.


    Sounds like a great time. I remember that opening day of dove season and opening day of deer season were really big social events in Texas.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 8,205 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Well guess what? I just paid for my grandson and I to go on a dove hunt on the first. Not only a hunt, but also a barbecue and drawings for prizes, one of which is a shotgun. If you don't want to hunt, you can just shoot trap and skeet. Knowing this part of the country it will be a combination of the two called Country Doubles. We shoot Country Doubles at most of these events. It's kind of a Texas Tradition. You have a low bird on the left and a high bird on the right that come out on your sides and fly straight away. I'm hell on that low bird, but not so much on the high one. It's usually almost out of range by the time you get a shot off. You have to be very quick to get them both. But I'm not going to shoot the clay birds. I want to hunt.

    Sounds like a fun day snake, taking the grandboy will make it even better
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,267 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    Sounds like a great time. I remember that opening day of dove season and opening day of deer season were really big social events in Texas.

    You know it, and this isn't even opening day of dove. But if there"s some birds it's gonna be fun, Hell it will be fun anyway, I'm gonna give it hell. But my grandson will really enjoy it.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 21,267 Senior Member
    Diver43 wrote: »
    Sounds like a fun day snake, taking the grandboy will make it even better


    Thanks my friend, and you know it. The older I get the more I love to be around my family, especially grand kids. I just wish you were here to join in with us.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,158 Senior Member
    I just got a full report from my dove hunting buddies, on the trip I didn't make, this year. It was the best year ever, naturally, and most of the guys shot all they could, and just sat down and watched them keep coming in, for the last thirty minutes.

    The ranch owner called the next day, after they left, and said they had had a major storm (the next night) with golf ball sized hail, and that it had killed hundreds of dove that were roosting on the high lines and in the mesquite trees. Too bad.
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