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Why drive a truck?

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  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    zorba wrote: »
    Pretty much!

    Does anyone know the drive train details?

    Depending on the year, either Continental or Caterpillar inline six diesel engines, 5 speed transmission with either direct or overdrive top gear, and double-reduction final drive axles similar to what Mack heavy-duty trucks use. The Cat engines are turbocharged, IMHO. Top speed is about 50 MPH or a little better with the overdrive trans. There's an in/out shifter for the front drive axle, not sure if the transfer case has a low range. There's a 2 1/2 and a 5 ton version. The engines are "multi-fuel"- - - -they run on gasoline, Diesel, home heating oil, JP-4 jet fuel, and high-octane pee if the driver has been drinking heavily and has a pretty good blood alcohol level!
    Jerry
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,654 Senior Member
    That sounds really cool, Teach. So how do they get a diesel to run reliably on gasoline without blowing up?
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Depending on the year, either Continental or Caterpillar inline six diesel engines, 5 speed transmission with either direct or overdrive top gear, and double-reduction final drive axles similar to what Mack heavy-duty trucks use. The Cat engines are turbocharged, IMHO. Top speed is about 50 MPH or a little better with the overdrive trans. There's an in/out shifter for the front drive axle, not sure if the transfer case has a low range.
    Jerry

    There's three different divorced transfer cases that were used but they all used Rockwell axles.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Lower the compression ratio a little. The average Diesel is somewhere around 22:1 compression, and a multi-fuel engine is more like 17-18 or so. That's just barely enough pressure to light off Diesel fuel, but it allows the use of more volatile fuels as well. I believe the procedure for "dry" fuels like aviation gasoline was to mix about 1 qt. of motor oil to 10 gallons of gas for injection pump lubrication. The old multifuel engines have a really smoky exhaust due to inefficient fuel burning due to low compression.
    Jerry
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,654 Senior Member
    Ah! My understanding is that diesels can work with 18:1 if they're turbocharged. Mixing motor oil should "cool off" the gas a bit too, I'd think.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    The old 2-stroke Detroit "Screamin' Jimmy" engines were on the low end of the compression scale, but they used a blower for cylinder scavenging. Every upstroke was compression, and every downstroke was power, with the piston uncovering transfer ports at the bottom of the cylinder. All 4 valves in the head were exhausts.
    Jerry
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