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Teach, Tennmike, maybe CPJ.

RocketmanRocketman BannedPosts: 1,118 Senior Member
50.photobucket.com/user/Brianjohn2/media/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpslgonmulu.jpg.html]image_zpslgonmulu.jpg[/URL]

First test for chasing on stainless stock. Not sure what grade it is but it's stainless. All I had was this smaller diameter so I turned a 1/2 20 thread. Also didn't have a 60degree carbide thread cutter so I ground one from my usual HSS. Didn't have any problems as I just took shallow passes. So how bout it?

Replies

  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Maybe CPJ? :tooth:
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Looks pretty good. Carbide isn't a necessity, but it certainly makes life a lot simpler. Now practice stopping a couple of thousandths oversize and use a thread file to sneak up on a 98/99% fit into a nut. Most dies get less than 90. I started grinding my own threading tool bits in 1963- - - -done quite a few since then!
    Jerry
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    Thank you. I took it slow and it turned out pretty nice. I'm very lucky that my old man taught me how to grind proper cutting tools when I was younger. Doing a small boring bar for tiny rocket nozzles is still a bit of a challenge though.
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    early wrote: »
    Maybe CPJ? :tooth:

    I thought he'd like that :jester:
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Didn't one of the astronauts say he was going to the moon sitting on top of millions of dollars' worth of low-bid parts?
    :jester:
    Jerry
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Good enough for government work.

    I knew you'd love it.....
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    Also Jerry, how might one get into proper gunsmithing?
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,398 Senior Member
    Looks good. Jerry's suggestion to leave it a little fat and use a thread file is a good one. Makes the thread a lot smoother. And the file lets you get a good tight high contact fit.

    I grind most of my own tool bits, too, but I use carbide for a lot of things depending on hardness. If you grind your own from blanks the 10% cobalt blanks wear really good on hard materials and stay sharper than tool steel longer. Just a thought.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    "Proper" gunsmithing means making a living at it- - - -I've been gun-tinkering for close to 40 years, and it's still just a hobby, but more rewarding than playing golf or drinking and chasing skirts. Make a living doing something you can tolerate (I taught school) and leave the gunsmithing to weekends and spare time. Putting food on the table, even if it involves something you love to do, changes your whole perspective, and not always in a good way. Eventually you can retire and become an opinionated old fart like me!
    :jester:
    Jerry
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    Oh I don't want to make a living of it. That's the best damn way to ruin a hobby unless it's of course, being sub contracted for rocket motors, bodies, nozzles and ejection recovery systems lol. But I'd love to learn to become an actual gunsmith. I can teach myself slowly or be taught very quickly. That's the way I reckon it.
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    Looks good. Jerry's suggestion to leave it a little fat and use a thread file is a good one. Makes the thread a lot smoother. And the file lets you get a good tight high contact fit.

    I grind most of my own tool bits, too, but I use carbide for a lot of things depending on hardness. If you grind your own from blanks the 10% cobalt blanks wear really good on hard materials and stay sharper than tool steel longer. Just a thought.

    Where does one find these particular cobalt blanks?
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 2,056 Senior Member
    Very cool thread, I've enjoyed all of the advice and tips and the test outcome.
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    A good way is finding junk/broken bargain guns and making them mo-bettah. Especially good would be the stuff on one in their right mind would do. Builds character. Like, for instance, converting a SMLE originally chambered in 303 British to 45-70. Takes a complete silly person to do that. I won't mention any names though....

    45-70 from a .303 Brit you say???? I'm a bit intrigued. You do the barrel work on that one too? **** you're the worst kind of enabler. Damn you.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Read everything you can get your hands on about the subject, especially from the oldtimers like P.O. Ackley, Bill Ruger, John Traister, etc. There are a series of gunsmithing books by Jerry Kuhnhausen, including "Mauser Rifles, a Shop Manual" which every aspiring smith should read, and virtually memorize. Jim Carmichael's "Do It Yourself Gunsmithing" and John Traister's "Gunsmithing At Home, Lock Stock and Barrel" is another good one. Finally, the "Gunsmith Kinks" series sold by Brownells records about three generations' worth of gunsmithing knowledge accumulated by the Brownell family. The NRA guide to firearms assembly and disassembly is a little out of date, but those books cover a couple of hundred fairly common firearms that are still in circulation, both long guns and handguns.

    I have all the books mentioned above, and I can open any one of them up and learn something new, even after years of reading them. Have fun!
    Jerry
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    I may own it, but I didn't have anything to do with it other than a dumb idea. Let's say....you don't want to do that. Someone will be along soon and confirm that. :tooth:
    I also have type 59 carbine (Chinese Mosin Nagant clone) chambered in .44 magnum. One of two in the world. (That we know of) the 45-70 Enfield isn't that odd, Gibbs rifle company made quite a few of them some years back.

    I'm sure that required some custom cursing with a bit of fabricating... Lol
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,096 Senior Member
    Rocketman wrote: »
    I'm sure that required some custom cursing with a bit of fabricating... Lol
    Ummm, I am fairly certain said builder added a chapter or 2 to the "Sailor's Book of Magic Words & Phrases" :cuss:

    I also remember him being quite clear when he posted, "NEVER AGAIN" in regards to that particular project
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,973 Senior Member
    One of the nicer 45-70 conversions I have seen was a Chinese type 59. It looked nothing like its original form.
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Rocketman wrote: »
    45-70 from a .303 Brit you say???? I'm a bit intrigued. You do the barrel work on that one too? **** you're the worst kind of enabler. Damn you.

    I want a 1914 Enfield rebarreled to 45-70. It's a much stronger action which you could load up to elephant gun status. A 45-70 when loaded up to Ruger No. 1 status is a slightly milder version of a .458 Win. Mag.

    Of course, if you're going to do all that, you might as well just build a .458 in the first place. It's more than strong enough.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Good luck finding one of those. They're scarce. A US Eddystone might be a little more available.
    Jerry
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,398 Senior Member
    Rocketman wrote: »
    Where does one find these particular cobalt blanks?

    mscdirect.com has the blanks for decent pricing. They carry 5% and 10% blanks from several different sources and pricing. ENCO and MSC combined and are now one company, but I'd check .use-enco.com/ too.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
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  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,398 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    I may own it, but I didn't have anything to do with it other than a dumb idea. Let's say....you don't want to do that. Someone will be along soon and confirm that. :tooth:
    I also have type 59 carbine (Chinese Mosin Nagant clone) chambered in .44 magnum. One of two in the world. (That we know of) the 45-70 Enfield isn't that odd, Gibbs rifle company made quite a few of them some years back.
    Rocketman wrote: »
    I'm sure that required some custom cursing with a bit of fabricating... Lol
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Ummm, I am fairly certain said builder added a chapter or 2 to the "Sailor's Book of Magic Words & Phrases" :cuss:

    I also remember him being quite clear when he posted, "NEVER AGAIN" in regards to that particular project

    I'm guilty as charged on the SMELLY .303 to .45-70 conversion, and on the two (that we know of) Chinese Type 53 7.62x54 to .44 Magnum conversions. The Type 53 conversions were WAY simpler than that :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: SMELLY .303 British to .45-70 conversion. And I had to make a couple of parts from 4140 flat stock for that Type 53 conversion. Easy money on those. That SMELLY conversion required three action specific jigs to be built just to get the action machined to accept the 'fat bottomed beech' of a .45-70 to fit the hole in the front receiver ring and do other machining bits that had to be done to accept that fat **** cartridge. Like removing metal from the front inside of the left action rail to accept that fat **** cartridge.

    And as Knitepoet said, the language in the shop deteriorated minute by minute as I worked on it. The entire contents of the Sailor's Book of Magic Words and Phrases was found to be wanting, so I expanded it! :roll2:

    All in all, a SMLE .303 to .45-70 conversion is a very easy first rebarreling and rechambering project and I highly recommend it for those wanting a first gunsmithing project! :roll2: :roll2: :roll2: I have three lathe and millling machine jigs that can be had for that project CHEAP!, CHEAP!, CHEAP! as I adamantly refuse to use them ever again.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Gibbs Rifle Company made those conversions from .303 Enfields to 3 shot 45-70s I believe.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,398 Senior Member
    Big Chief wrote: »
    Gibbs Rifle Company made those conversions from .303 Enfields to 3 shot 45-70s I believe.

    I bet I damn sure know why they quit that foolishness, too!
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,398 Senior Member
    As an aside, the Marlin 882 .22 Mag. to .25 ACP conversion was easy. And as far as I know, I have the only bolt action .25 ACP repeater in existence. :tooth:
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
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